Forensics v. Photoshop

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Alan Browne, Sep 18, 2012.

  1. Alan Browne

    philo Guest


    In 1957 I was thrilled to move up from my Brownie box camera
    to a Brownie with a built-in flash :)
    I kept using it until 1970!
    (Still have it)
     
    philo, Sep 26, 2012
    #61
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  2. Alan Browne

    tony cooper Guest

    My first job after completing my undergraduate degree in 1960 was at
    the Chicago Tribune at a salary of $75.00 a week. That encouraged me
    to attend graduate school at Northwestern.

    Tuition at Northwestern was much higher than tuition at Indiana
    University. At IU it was $110 per semester for a full load. I forget
    how much it was at Northwestern, but it was more.
     
    tony cooper, Sep 26, 2012
    #62
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  3. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Alan Browne, Sep 26, 2012
    #63
  4. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    Actually you can see it twice in the second shot. On the curve of the
    fender to my left it is somewhat obscured by a tree, while on the
    fender to my right the angle changed enough to move my reflection out
    in the open.

    Sigh!
    There are four drivers to be found in this area. The 1937 810 Roadster
    above, along with two other 1937's, and this 1936 810 Sedan.
    My reflection is there, but concealed a little better.
    < http://db.tt/4KvNzXNI >
     
    Savageduck, Sep 26, 2012
    #64
  5. Alan Browne

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Sounds much the same as the Miranda gear that I bought at about the
    same time as you. I remember the shutter packed up early in the
    camera's life and I eventually got rid of it as I could _never_ obtain
    sharp photographs, even under test conditions.
     
    Eric Stevens, Sep 26, 2012
    #65
  6. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    Since it was a Sears catalog that started this off, here is one of the
    things you could buy from the catalog in 1914 for $222.50, a single
    cylinder model ran $197.50:
    < http://db.tt/sGZmgOVu >
     
    Savageduck, Sep 27, 2012
    #66
  7. Alan Browne

    Trevor Guest

    Gee that steak dinner was expensive on a $12 per week wage! I'm glad it's a
    lot cheaper now relatively speaking.
    Of course if you want to bring camera's back into it, a decent one was out
    of the reach of most workers, even a box brownie was an investment for most
    people.

    Trevor.
     
    Trevor, Sep 27, 2012
    #67
  8. What are you complaining about?

    There's a country, where they had a nice gold backed, gold
    standard currency, worth approximately USD 0.25 (which was
    also gold backed).

    A bit later, people used the paper money to heat the house: wood
    was more expensive ... and the money on some days was halved in
    value between morning and evening.[1]

    Then a new currency came out, which converted 1,000,000,000,000
    of the old currency to 1 of the new. Again, worth was
    approximately USD 0.25.

    Which soon enough was exchanged (usually) 10:1 for yet another
    currency. 90% of your savings gone.

    That currency has also been replaced by yet another one.


    Funny money anyone?

    -Wolfgang

    [1] However, there have been worse cases. Like prices doubling
    every 15 hours --- average over a whole month!
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 27, 2012
    #68
  9. I liked the bottom-weighted metering, and I liked the shutter-release
    location (front rather than top, making verticals easier to hold
    stably), and I liked the interchangeable viewfinders (I never got
    another viewfinder, just the basic prism, but you could take it off and
    look down into the body from above to get essentially a waist-level
    finder).

    I didn't have particular trouble with sharpness for 8x10 prints (or
    sometimes slightly greater enlargement due to cropping).
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 27, 2012
    #69
  10. Alan Browne

    PeterN Guest

    Nice try, but mine was a sedan.
     
    PeterN, Sep 27, 2012
    #70
  11. Alan Browne

    PeterN Guest

    I bought it used. It had been up on blocks since sometimes in the 40's.
    The owner's son, who was the original was an MIA in WWII. I paid the
    asking price, and I forgot how much to the mechanic who got it back on
    the road. But IIRC it was under $100.
     
    PeterN, Sep 27, 2012
    #71
  12. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    So I guess you missed this 1936 810 sedan:
    < http://db.tt/4KvNzXNI >
     
    Savageduck, Sep 27, 2012
    #72
  13. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    My responses seem to be problematic at my server end, so here goes a repost:

    Since it was a Sears catalog that started this off, here is one of the
    things you could buy from the catalog in 1914 for $222.50, a single
    cylinder model ran $197.50:
    < http://db.tt/sGZmgOVu >
     
    Savageduck, Sep 28, 2012
    #73
  14. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    My responses seem to be problematic at my server end, so here goes a repost:

    Actually you can see it twice in the second shot. On the curve of the
    fender to my left it is somewhat obscured by a tree, while on the
    fender to my right the angle changed enough to move my reflection out
    in the open.

    Sigh!
    There are four drivers to be found in this area. The 1937 810 Roadster
    above, along with two other 1937's, and this 1936 810 Sedan.
    My reflection is there, but concealed a little better.
    < http://db.tt/4KvNzXNI >
     
    Savageduck, Sep 28, 2012
    #74
  15. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    I seem to be having some sort of problem with my server and my posts
    are apparent phantoms, so I am reposting this response.

    So I guess you missed this 1936 810 sedan:
    < http://db.tt/4KvNzXNI >
     
    Savageduck, Sep 28, 2012
    #75
  16. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 09/23/2012 02:29 PM, Russell D. wrote:
    : > This is from a couple years before I became really interested in
    : > photography but I could spend hours pouring over stuff like this when I
    : > was a kid.
    : >
    : > http://www.retronaut.co/2012/05/seers-camera-catalogue-1961/
    : >
    :
    :
    :
    : Great find!
    :
    : In 1961 that $375 Nikon was probably out of the price range of
    : just about everyone

    That's an SP! I had one of those, along with 50mm f/1.4, 28mm f/3.5, and 135mm
    f/3.5 lenses. I traded in my S2 body to get it, and later traded in the lot on
    an F-2 with the same set of lenses. A bit later I bought my wife a Nikkormat
    with a 50mm f/2 lens. We were pretty well equipped for those days!

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 29, 2012
    #76
  17. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : > On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 07:04:46 -0500, "Neil Ellwood"
    : >
    : >>David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    : >>
    : >>>
    : >>> > On 09/23/2012 02:29 PM, Russell D. wrote:
    : >>> >> This is from a couple years before I became really interested in
    : >>> >> photography but I could spend hours pouring over stuff like this
    : >>> when I >> was a kid.
    : >>> > >
    : >>> >> http://www.retronaut.co/2012/05/seers-camera-catalogue-1961/
    : >>>
    : >>> > Great find!
    : >>>
    : >>> +1
    : >>>
    : >>> > In 1961 that $375 Nikon was probably out of the price range of
    : >>> > just about everyone
    : >>>
    : >>> In 1969, I bought my first SLR, a Miranda Sensorex, from a local
    : >>> camera store for $280. The 8 years means the SP wasn't really around
    : >>> any more, but the price means that I, a highschool freshman working
    : >>> his first job and being paid minimum wage, could have considered
    : >>> going to that level if it seemed the right thing. (Something from
    : >>> Nikon would in fact have been a better choice; the Sensorex had some
    : >>> neat aspects, and did fairly well for me, but I traded it off around
    : >>> four years later for Pentax and Leica gear, whereas I would have hung
    : >>> on to Nikon I think.)
    : >>>
    : >>> (The nice thing about having no expenses is that a small income lets
    : >>> you do quite a lot.)
    : >>
    : >>In 1961 I bought my first slr - a Miranda D with interchangable
    : >>viewfinders and a 50mm 2,8 preset lens ( got a Miranda 250mm tele a
    : >>month later) the cost was ?69 and the lens quality was superb - shutter
    : >>speeds only went to 1/500 sec. The focusing screen was user
    : >>interchangable but took quite a while and was fiddly. I also purchased
    : >>the magnifying viefinder which (if I am right was 1x and 5x depending
    : >>on which way your eye piece was). The lens mount was a dual one with
    : >>preset lenses using the inner mount and auto lenses using the outer
    : >>mount.
    : >
    : > Sounds much the same as the Miranda gear that I bought at about the
    : > same time as you. I remember the shutter packed up early in the
    : > camera's life and I eventually got rid of it as I could _never_ obtain
    : > sharp photographs, even under test conditions.
    :
    : I liked the bottom-weighted metering, and I liked the shutter-release
    : location (front rather than top, making verticals easier to hold
    : stably), ...

    IIRC, most of the earliest SLRs had the shutter release on the front. I think
    it was because the same button stopped down the lens (either manually or by
    releasing the spring-loaded preset) and triggered the shutter.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 29, 2012
    #77
  18. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    On 2012-09-24 20:45:49 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    :
    : > On 9/24/2012 9:49 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    : >> On 2012-09-24 18:36:01 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    : >>
    : >>> On 9/24/2012 4:44 PM, Mort wrote:
    : >>>> Russell D. wrote:
    : >>>>> This is from a couple years before I became really interested in
    : >>>>> photography but I could spend hours pouring over stuff like this when I
    : >>>>> was a kid.
    : >>>>>
    : >>>>> http://www.retronaut.co/2012/05/seers-camera-catalogue-1961/
    : >>>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Hi,
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Thanks for the memories. That Nikon SP, with 50 mm. F.1.4 lens and
    : >>>> leather case, was $150.- in the European Post Exchanges of the U.S.
    : >>>> Army.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Times sure have changed.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Regards,
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Mort Linder
    : >>>>
    : >>>
    : >>> Not really, if you use my hot dog index.
    : >>> In 1961 a hot dog at Nathans was no more than twenty five cents. It
    : >>> had just gone up from fifteen cents.
    : >>
    : >> Damn! ...and I still remember 19.9 ¢/gal gas at a Hess station in
    : >> Upstate NY in 1971. :-(
    : >>
    : >
    : > Gas prices have exceeded the hot dog index, as have car prices. :-(
    :
    : In 1969 You could have had a Shelby 427 Cobra for $4200. Today the same
    : car if intact, would start at $200K+. With a good provenance you will
    : be looking at $1M+.
    :
    : See what your $4200 buys you today!

    A D800 and a D800e.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 29, 2012
    #78
  19. Alan Browne

    PeterN Guest

    do YOU MEAN "OR"?
     
    PeterN, Sep 29, 2012
    #79
  20. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 9/28/2012 10:50 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
    : > On Mon, 24 Sep 2012 20:58:51 -0700, Savageduck
    : > : On 2012-09-24 20:45:49 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    : > :
    : > : > On 9/24/2012 9:49 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    : > : >> On 2012-09-24 18:36:01 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    : > : >>
    : > : >>> On 9/24/2012 4:44 PM, Mort wrote:
    : > : >>>> Russell D. wrote:
    : > : >>>>> This is from a couple years before I became really interested in
    : > : >>>>> photography but I could spend hours pouring over stuff like this when I
    : > : >>>>> was a kid.
    : > : >>>>>
    : > : >>>>> http://www.retronaut.co/2012/05/seers-camera-catalogue-1961/
    : > : >>>>>
    : > : >>>>
    : > : >>>> Hi,
    : > : >>>>
    : > : >>>> Thanks for the memories. That Nikon SP, with 50 mm. F.1.4 lens and
    : > : >>>> leather case, was $150.- in the European Post Exchanges of the U.S.
    : > : >>>> Army.
    : > : >>>>
    : > : >>>> Times sure have changed.
    : > : >>>>
    : > : >>>> Regards,
    : > : >>>>
    : > : >>>> Mort Linder
    : > : >>>>
    : > : >>>
    : > : >>> Not really, if you use my hot dog index.
    : > : >>> In 1961 a hot dog at Nathans was no more than twenty five cents. It
    : > : >>> had just gone up from fifteen cents.
    : > : >>
    : > : >> Damn! ...and I still remember 19.9 ¢/gal gas at a Hess station in
    : > : >> Upstate NY in 1971. :-(
    : > : >>
    : > : >
    : > : > Gas prices have exceeded the hot dog index, as have car prices. :-(
    : > :
    : > : In 1969 You could have had a Shelby 427 Cobra for $4200. Today the same
    : > : car if intact, would start at $200K+. With a good provenance you will
    : > : be looking at $1M+.
    : > :
    : > : See what your $4200 buys you today!
    : >
    : > A D800 and a D800e.
    : >
    : > Bob
    : >
    :
    : do YOU MEAN "OR"?

    Yeah, I wasn't thinking clearly. The D800 is around $3000, not $2000. So make
    that two 7D's and a decent lens. :^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 29, 2012
    #80
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