Fuji S2 vs. Nikon D100

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Steve, Sep 6, 2003.

  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I guess the big question for me is ... If I had to choose between the 2 what
    would I do?
    I hear the pixels on the Fuji are honey comb vs. square and that means a
    better image 2 fold.
    I would like to start some banter on this subject. What would you do?

    Steve
     
    Steve, Sep 6, 2003
    #1
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  2. Steve

    MG Guest

    My wife bought me the S2 Pro and after the initial shock of having a
    non-Nikon branded camera wore off, I love it.
    Excellent choice-- my wife works with digital files in a pro lab and she
    loves the S2 files to work on and print---She has done a 30" X "50" on the
    Chromira and it was wonderful. Normally, she does not enlarge that much but
    16X20s are pieces of cake.

    MG
     
    MG, Sep 6, 2003
    #2
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  3. Steve

    Kenwood Guest

    This is a weekly common question in this newsgroup.
    Answers vary. The Fuji owners say pick Fuji, Nikonians pick the D100.
    Both cameras have been out for well over a year, maybe even 2 years.
    The banter on this subject has been bantered and beaten.

    Google search this newsgroup for tons of answers.
    Many of the major camera review sites like Dpreview and Stevesdigicams have
    done many comparisons between the two. Things often compared are max
    shutter speed, ISO limits, flash synch, batteries, accessory grips, synch
    ports, etc.

    In my opinion, the S2, D100 and D10 all take pictures within 10% of each
    other in all aspects.
    The final output is determined by the person's post processing skills.

    Visit Photosig and search for images taken with each of the cameras. You
    will find an array of great images from each camera.
     
    Kenwood, Sep 6, 2003
    #3
  4. I was the one that started this same thread a couple of weeks ago. After
    beating it to death with internet research, I ended up buying the Fuji S2
    Pro when it got to within $100 of the D100. My reasons were sharpness,
    sharpness, sharpness, low noise even at high ISO, and color tone balance.

    I haven't been disappointed with the Fuji at all. Very flexible, very
    useable, and indeed it takes very sharp pictures. I have come to find,
    however, that the level of sharpness in your final output depends hugely on
    the lens you use and your technique. If you're just going to noodle around
    taking snapshots with $100 lenses, then it won't make a bit of difference
    whether you get the S2 Pro, the D100, or the D10.. But it you have the
    skillz, a good lens, and want to put some 11x17s on the wall, I'd recommend
    the Fuji S2 Pro.

    HMc
     
    Howard McCollister, Sep 6, 2003
    #4
  5. I agree with everything HMc has written. I've had my Fuji S2 Pro for a
    while now and very quickly discovered the limitations of cheaper glass on
    this camera. I ended up tossing the cheaper optics in favour of the
    Nikkors. Currently using Nikkor 21~24mm AF-S ED; 24~85mm AF-D and 70~300mm
    AF-D ED lenses with the S2 and loving it. Damn fine camera and worth every
    buck I paid for it. Looked closely at the competition, read the reviews and
    the Fuji S2 won hands down against similar priced and featured units.
    Colour fidelity is outstanding as it noise performance at higher ISO and
    long exposure times.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Rutlidge, Sep 6, 2003
    #5
  6. Have had my S2 for just over a year now, and have never regretted the
    purchase for even a minute.
    I agree with Alan regarding the cheaper glass. I will probably change my
    Nikon 70-300 G for the ED version which Alan has.

    I also use a Sigma 15-30 lens which I find quite good, once I got used to
    taking extra care to avoid flare.

    I regularly make A3 prints from pictures taken with the S2, some of which
    have won first places in club competitions.
    No complaints from me.

    Regards
    Dennis
     
    Dennis Bradley, Sep 6, 2003
    #6
  7. I have that 70-300 AF-D ED f4-5.6 Nikkor and it is an oustanding lens. The
    other lens I use a lot is the 50mm AF-D f1.8, which has to be one of the
    best $100 lenses out there. I'm waiting for a 24-120 G-AFS VR (who isn't?)
    which is on backorder from B&H. In the meantime, I'm getting by with my old
    28-80 G f 3.3-5.6, which I used to think was a pretty good lens on my N80
    film camera. Then when I started using it on the S2Pro, that camera pointed
    out clearly the weaknesses in that consumer lens. Photo's are so sharp with
    my 50 mm and with the 70-300 that I can't bear to use that 28-80. I hope the
    24-120 VR can do as well as the other two.

    I found that looking at a 5x7 photograph you got back from WalMart is not
    the same thing as looking at a 12 megapixel digital photo on your computer
    monitor at 100%. All of a sudden, you become much more aware of lens
    softness, poor technique, even specks of dust. The thing that surprised me a
    little about this level of digital camera (dSLR) is that it really makes you
    want to learn to be a better photographer.

    HMc
     
    Howard McCollister, Sep 6, 2003
    #7
  8. Steve

    W6DKN Guest

    If you compare the RAW files from the S2, D100, 10D, etc. you will be hard
    pressed to tell one from the other. The big problem with all the reviews is
    that they use the camera's default .JPG settings for image comparison, so
    all they are really comparing are the differences in the firmware image
    processing.

    For example, the default S2 .JPG processing applies much more saturation
    boost in the green channel than the D100 does. The 10D does .JPG edge
    sharpening, whereas the D100 sharpens the whole image, so the 10D appears
    to have less noise. But when you actually compare RAW files (pure CCD/CMOS
    data, no in-camera processing), these "differences" are not so obvious.

    (and if you are serious about getting the best image possible - regardless
    of camera brand - then you shoot RAW, not .JPG)

    Bottom line - buy whatever camera works with your existing lenses and/or
    feels best to you. Shoot in RAW mode, and as long as you use quality glass
    and have decent post-processing skills, you will produce excellent images,
    regardless of camera choice.

    All these DSLR's are intended to provide the advanced photographer with the
    most control/latitude over initial capture and during post processing, in
    order to produce the highest quality images. Perhaps someday the reviewers
    will quit addressing them like "point and shoot" digicams...

    <<< Dan >>>
     
    W6DKN, Sep 6, 2003
    #8
  9. Steve

    Guest Guest

    agree with you
    Most pro i know went with the S2 becos they dont want to spend time
    playing post processing..........i was stupid to go with the 10D......

    but I did some considerable money at the point of purchase
    now the price is almost the same........
     
    Guest, Sep 7, 2003
    #9
  10. Steve

    W6DKN Guest

    Granted, the flash thing is a big point for the Fuji if you don't plan on
    using current technology Nikon flashes. OTOH, mating an SB-80DX flash with
    the D100 gives superb, effortless flash and fill flash results
    consistently. Much better than any other camera/flash combination I have
    used before... (and I too have been shooting with Nikon gear for 30-some
    years...)

    As for lens compatibility, are you saying that the S2 will mount and meter
    with non-CPU lenses, or only that you can mount and use them manually
    without in-camera metering (as with the D100)?. Since the S2 is basically a
    D100 with a Fuji sensor and firmware, lens compatibility should be (and is,
    from what I've read) the same for either.

    = Dan =
     
    W6DKN, Sep 8, 2003
    #10
  11. Yes, superb results on my S2 Pro with my SB80DX too, although the camera
    will TTL with a variety of other non-DX TTL flashes unlike the D100. As to
    the lens, I believe the metering with non-CPU lenses is the same as the
    D100.

    There are some other advantages to the D100, such at flash synch at 1/180,
    and the ability to use a vertical release. OTOH, I really like the built-in
    firewire on the Fuji so that I can batch upload multiple RAW files to my
    laptop in the field without having to stuff a firewire CF reader into my
    laptop case -- not possible with the D100.

    Those things were important to me, but not crucial in my decision to get one
    versus the other. But I went with the Fuji because I just couldn't get
    around the sharpness and low noise advantage of the Fuji based on multiple
    comparison photos on multiple review sites. In the couple of weeks that I've
    had it, I haven't been disappointed.

    HMc
     
    Howard McCollister, Sep 8, 2003
    #11
  12. You can not beat the Fuji for the way they reproduce color

    "Dennis Bradley"
    of weeks ago.
    After
    output depends
    hugely
    cheaper glass
    on
    I have that 70-300 AF-D ED f4-5.6 Nikkor and it is an
    oustanding lens. The
    other lens I use a lot is the 50mm AF-D f1.8, which has to
    be one of the
    best $100 lenses out there. I'm waiting for a 24-120 G-AFS
    VR (who isn't?)
    which is on backorder from B&H. In the meantime, I'm getting
    by with my old
    28-80 G f 3.3-5.6, which I used to think was a pretty good
    lens on my N80
    film camera. Then when I started using it on the S2Pro, that
    camera pointed
    out clearly the weaknesses in that consumer lens. Photo's
    are so sharp with
    my 50 mm and with the 70-300 that I can't bear to use that
    28-80. I hope the
    24-120 VR can do as well as the other two.

    I found that looking at a 5x7 photograph you got back from
    WalMart is not
    the same thing as looking at a 12 megapixel digital photo on
    your computer
    monitor at 100%. All of a sudden, you become much more aware
    of lens
    softness, poor technique, even specks of dust. The thing
    that surprised me a
    little about this level of digital camera (dSLR) is that it
    really makes you
    want to learn to be a better photographer.

    HMc
     
    Boots Crofoot, Sep 8, 2003
    #12
  13. The S2 can mount but not meter with non-cpu lenses. However, taking a
    trial photo or two isn't much worse than metering in my opinion. Of
    course I spent considerable time doing photojournalism with meterless
    cameras in my youth, so I can still live without metering each and
    every shot :).
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 9, 2003
    #13
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