Fuji Velvia Being Phased Out?

Discussion in 'Fuji' started by Larry R Harrison Jr, Jul 24, 2003.

  1. Larry R Harrison Jr

    T P Guest


    True. But there is a difference.

    I can forgive a small company like Agfa for abandoning a slow-selling
    product line, but I find it difficult to forgive a company as large as
    Kodak for not offering a wide range of films including a significant
    proportion of advanced emulsions.

    Fuji showed Kodak how to do it some time ago, and that's one reason
    why I now buy virtually all my film in green boxes. Only three years
    ago the boxes in my 'fridge were all yellow.
     
    T P, Jul 25, 2003
    #21
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  2. Larry R Harrison Jr

    T P Guest


    I think it's fair to say that no-one has yet made a film that combines
    the low granularity, excellent acutance and superb colour rendition
    and saturation of Kodachrome 25.
     
    T P, Jul 25, 2003
    #22
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  3. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Kodak did, but they killed it.
     
    Mxsmanic, Jul 25, 2003
    #23
  4. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Mxsmanic Guest

    It has more grain, but it is sharper.
    It's quite an exaggeration. I really cannot see grain in Provia or
    Velvia even at 100% of a 4000-dpi scan unless I find some nice, blurry,
    even area where any irregularity is easier to spot.

    The way the scanner renders grain at 4000 dpi makes me believe that it
    is actually still exaggerating it, too, at least slightly.
     
    Mxsmanic, Jul 25, 2003
    #24
  5. Larry R Harrison Jr

    ThomasH Guest

    I would suggest to look at Agfa's revenue. This is *not* a small company.
    Its a multi billion chemical and publication technology giant. In film
    sure only the number 3 after Kodak and Fuji, but still quite significant.
    And they made already their transition toward future and they do not
    shrink in such alarming rate like Kodak does.

    Thomas
     
    ThomasH, Jul 25, 2003
    #25
  6. Larry R Harrison Jr

    T P Guest


    What are Agfa's annual film sales in
    relation to those of Kodak and Fuji?
     
    T P, Jul 25, 2003
    #26
  7. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Pål Jensen Guest


    No. If it is anything like Provia F it is "Anti-Kodachrome".
    Kodachrome biggest force is its high accutance. Simply put; Kodachromes look
    sharper than anything else. Even Kodachrome 200 has higher accutance than
    Provia F.
     
    Pål Jensen, Jul 25, 2003
    #27
  8. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Pål Jensen Guest


    I don't agree with the color rendition part. I think color rendition
    effectively killed the Kodachrome line sales wise. Unless it is the
    processing, my Kodachrome 25 slides have been essentially colorless compared
    to any other film - even Agfa's.
     
    Pål Jensen, Jul 25, 2003
    #28
  9. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Pål Jensen Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" <> skrev i melding

    Provias problems is that the overdone blues aren't really blue but
    grey-blue. At least my early batch (I've never used the film since).
     
    Pål Jensen, Jul 25, 2003
    #29
  10. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Lewis Lang Guest

    Subject: Re: Fuji Velvia Being Phased Out?
    Up until the late '80's/early '90's Kodachromes used to be sparkling both in
    sharpness and color (for Kodak, Fair Lawn, NJ and A&I), but I haven't shot any
    Kodachrome since about '97 and the stuff I shot then was probably either short
    dated or expired so I can't judge the color honestly from that. Its probably
    both the processing (standards seem to have gone down during the '90's give or
    take (during the Qualux time period) as well as for whatever reasons the K25
    and K64 emulsions have grained up (don't have the link handy but K64 used to
    have an RMS of 10, now it has an RMS of 12 which is pitifull in this day and
    age of fine grained films) and Fuji has always seemed to outshine the
    Kodachromes in color saturation for the most part, even Fujichrome 50 (now
    deceased) seemed to have been able to match the Kodachromes easily and Velvia
    leaves Kodachrome in the dust for saturation and most (all?) Fuji slide films
    seem far less grainy than their Kodachrome counterparts. Kodachrome is still a
    great film but mainly for its specialized qualities of high acutence and
    archival dark storage longevity, but as far as colors go, who wants a blah
    colored slide that will last for 200 years when you can have a wonderfully
    saturated yet natural looking slide (Sensia 100) for at least 40 years.
    Kodachrome, once the main stay of most slide shooters has now become, for want
    of a better term, a "special purpose film", had Kodak improved the grain
    instead of making it grainier and added Kodachrome 125 (which I don't think
    even made it beyond some trade trialing) and increased saturation and added
    mini-labs that could quickly process the stuff Kodachrome would be "the new
    E-6" - instead they killed Kodachrome like it was a bastard child or a horse
    that needed to be "put to sleep" - IDIOTS!!!

    Lewis

    Check out my photos at "LEWISVISION":

    http://members.aol.com/Lewisvisn/home.htm

    Remove "nospam" to reply
     
    Lewis Lang, Jul 26, 2003
    #30
  11. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Peter Chant Guest

    Using something like sfx might be quite interesting, or strang.
     
    Peter Chant, Jul 27, 2003
    #31
  12. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Peter Chant Guest

    sfx is Ilford SFX, you could call it an infra-red film but it
    toward an extended red respose apparently. With a deep red filter
    leaves and grass appear a reasonable colour rather than black.

    strang is strange spelt incorrectly!
     
    Peter Chant, Jul 28, 2003
    #32
  13. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Lewis Lang Guest

    Subject: Re: Fuji Velvia Being Phased Out?
    No, Pete, "strang" is strange spelled "strang"ely ;-)!

    :)

    Lewis

    Check out my photos at "LEWISVISION":

    http://members.aol.com/Lewisvisn/home.htm

    Remove "nospam" to reply
     
    Lewis Lang, Jul 28, 2003
    #33
  14. COLORLESS? You're mad! The film was over-saturated as it was! What are
    you using for lenses? Cokeagons?
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Jul 28, 2003
    #34
  15. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Alan Browne Guest


    I have trays of K-25's from 1980 that are brillant and maintaining their
    color. I store them in a cool/dry place, period, and they only see the
    projector every few years.

    Consumers began shifting to P&S and prints in the mid/late 80's, and E-6
    films were "good enough" for most people who still preferred slides and
    didn't want to wait for the Kodachrome processing. The K-25 business
    continually dropped to a point where Kodak could no longer justify it.
    K-64 (PKR) and K-200 (PKL) continue as there are enough professional
    photogs using it.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 28, 2003
    #35
  16. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Alan Browne Guest

    I haven't used K-chrome since then (for other reasons), and now I use E-6.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 28, 2003
    #36
  17. Larry R Harrison Jr

    Peter Chant Guest

    I was going to post a witty retort, but I have run out!

    ;-)
     
    Peter Chant, Jul 29, 2003
    #37
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