fuji's statement on FILM

Discussion in 'Fuji' started by k, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. k

    k Guest

    January 19, 2006


    Since our foundation in 1934, we have been developing our business in
    photosensitive materials on a global scale, thanks to the support and
    patronage of general consumers, retailers, photograph wholesalers, and
    various others. The unexpectedly rapid shift toward digitalization has
    greatly reduced demand for films and photographic products. The entire
    photography industry, including our company, has been put in a difficult
    market situation. In order to respond these difficult market changes, we are
    currently proceeding with comprehensive structural reforms.

    Despite the current challenges, we believe that photography is indispensable
    to humankind because of its ability to express such precious things as joy,
    sadness, love and the full spectrum of emotions. Our mission is to preserve
    and nurture the culture of photography to meet the needs of our longtime
    customers. Silver halide photography, which is fundamental to photography,
    has advantages over digital in such areas as power of expression, long term
    storage capability, reasonable prices, easy handling and a highly
    established and convenient photo development and print infrastructure.

    We intend to continue our silver halide photography business and to further
    cultivate the culture of photography, and in so doing, continue to support
    our customers and retailers and all those who enjoy photography.

    http://home.fujifilm.com/news/n060119_2.html


    k
     
    k, Jan 26, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. k

    Dogfart Guest

    Could this be a "Mark Latham has my full support" sort of thing?
     
    Dogfart, Jan 26, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. I think it's more likely a public statement that they're staying with
    film, in the hope that others abandon it - leaving Fuji as the only film
    supplier. If supplier X was wondering "oh Fuji might give up, we'll
    stay" they're now reconsidering their position.

    It might be a shrinking market, but as manufacturers leave there's still
    plenty of scope for production and profit.

    Still, I wouldn't expect the full range to survive.
     
    Andrew Hennell, Jan 26, 2006
    #3
  4. k

    woods Guest

    Geez. talk about sticking with a dead horse.
     
    woods, Jan 26, 2006
    #4
  5. k

    FuTAnT Guest

    Go and have a look at medium or large format silver halide print then come
    back to me. The detail and emotion is amazing. Absolutely shits all over
    what some prosumer digital is going to give you.
     
    FuTAnT, Jan 26, 2006
    #5
  6. k

    POTD.com.au Guest

    But how does it stand up against pro-digital SLR or digital back? Digital
    is moving at a fast pace too and I doubt if even if large format film will
    compete in the not to distant future.

    I love Fuji film as it was my film of choice for my entire career, but
    unless Fuji can be the sole survivor who provides what will inevitably
    become a niche market, there may be some truth in the "dead horse"
    statement.

    I guess none of us know for sure what the future of film will be and we will
    simply have to wait and see what happens.

    Cheers

    Rusty
     
    POTD.com.au, Jan 26, 2006
    #6
  7. k

    Avery Guest


    I'll bet that their supermarket range will die off fairly quickly but
    a cannot imagine them giving up the professional films that they make.
    It's too good a market even if it has reduced a bit.
     
    Avery, Jan 26, 2006
    #7
  8. We had a members' slide night at our bushwalking club the other night
    and for this film still shit's on digital slide shows (mind you, a lot
    of them were mine so they were terrific).
     
    David Springthorpe, Jan 26, 2006
    #8
  9. k

    Michael Guest

    But how does it stand up against pro-digital SLR or digital back? Digital

    Tall Poppies
     
    Michael, Jan 27, 2006
    #9
  10. k

    Michael Guest

    films not dead, sorry. (what am i apologizing for?)
     
    Michael, Jan 27, 2006
    #10
  11. k

    woods Guest

    films not dead, sorry. (what am i apologizing for?)[/QUOTE]


    yeah...not dead yet........

    That whole company statement was sad. They must be bleeding through the
    eye balls.
     
    woods, Jan 27, 2006
    #11
  12. k

    k Guest

    "POTD.com.au" <
    | But how does it stand up against pro-digital SLR or digital back? Digital
    | is moving at a fast pace too and I doubt if even if large format film will
    | compete in the not to distant future.



    lets see.. I read some blither in a photo rag by some dude who was wowed by
    his wondrous LF digi back and how it only took 35 minutes to make a
    wonderfully massive 4x5 scan of the scene in front of him. (I think it was
    mid 2005)

    made me giggle.

    110, 16mm, 8x10 - makes no diff - f16 @ 1/60 and bob's yer auntie :)


    I suppose storing 390ish 640Mb images from a 8x10 digi on a 250Gb hdd is
    reasonably cheap, probably cheaper than buying the film.. but you'd need a
    rather cracking PC to manipulate the buggers, and I'd guess the back would
    cost a bit more than a double dark

    that's of course assuming we're talking the same res in an 8x10 as an
    upsized 12Mp camera. if you were scanning from film you'be be talking
    1280Mp of data to play with. hmm - a terrabyte hard drive per image now
    does NOT seem so economical (!)

    nah. I'll stick with film for the 4x5 and the 8x10. for the 'convenient'
    format (35mm), I guess film is too much of a nuisance for many and digi
    certainly seems like a better way to go.

    but.

    I still find printing b&w from neg and getting real blacks quicker and
    easier in one of them old, smelly dark rooms ;-)


    | I love Fuji film as it was my film of choice for my entire career, but
    | unless Fuji can be the sole survivor who provides what will inevitably
    | become a niche market, there may be some truth in the "dead horse"
    | statement.

    I shouldn't worry - Stirling (formerly Agfa India) will probably keep making
    film for a while, I read somewhere that the Indians are rather happy with
    film, and sooner or later someone will probably bring some of it here

    I miss the APX 100 (agfa) and I'm still in shock re Koni's departure (the
    SRG 3200 and 160 were AWESOME films!) - and their 750IR with the
    antihalation backing beat the living crap out of Kodak for scientific stuff


    | I guess none of us know for sure what the future of film will be and we
    will
    | simply have to wait and see what happens.


    You're probably right Rusty, but then they still make oil paints and
    watercolours ;-)

    k
     
    k, Jan 27, 2006
    #12
  13. k

    POTD.com.au Guest

    Ah... but do they still make deguerreotypes? ;-) LOL
     
    POTD.com.au, Jan 27, 2006
    #13
  14. k

    NikonF4 Guest

    Just so long as I can still get film for my Kodak 4000 disc camera. But
    then maybe it is time to update to APS.
     
    NikonF4, Jan 27, 2006
    #14
  15. k

    kosh Guest


    yeah... unfortunatley you can't get anything to show them with now!

    Australian electrical approval is prohibitively expensive.... unless
    enough projectors are going to sell in australia to make it worthwhile.

    if you have one... better keep it in good nick!

    Leica p-150 no longer coming to australia due to an Aus only pain in the
    backside rule.

    Reflecta probably on the way out due to prohibitive costs.... kodak...
    forget it!


    While I'm all for film to cintinue..... the tools associated with it may
    die out before film itself does!

    kosh
     
    kosh, Jan 28, 2006
    #15
  16. k

    k Guest

    "POTD.com.au"
    | Ah... but do they still make deguerreotypes? ;-) LOL


    not commercially (would anyone accept liability for fuming mercury?? ;-),
    but cyano paper is still alive :)



    k
     
    k, Jan 28, 2006
    #16
  17. k

    Dogfart Guest

    I have a 626 Box Brownie. Is film still available for that?
     
    Dogfart, Jan 28, 2006
    #17
  18. k

    Nige Guest

    Do you mean a 620 Box Brownie? If so, then yes... or with a 1 min
    modification to a roll of 120, use that.

    Cheers, Nige.
     
    Nige, Jan 28, 2006
    #18
  19. k

    Nige Guest

    Do you mean a 620 Box Brownie? If so, then yes... or with a 1 min
    modification to a roll of 120, use that.

    Cheers, Nige.
     
    Nige, Jan 28, 2006
    #19
  20. k

    kosh Guest

    works a charm... did it myself on an old Agfa folding camera.
     
    kosh, Jan 29, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.