Full colour sensor research

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Alfred Molon, Apr 13, 2014.

  1. Alfred Molon

    Alfred Molon Guest

    There has been some research on full colour imaging sensors, with some papers
    published as early as 1998. The papers of 1998/99 focus on semiconducting
    polymers or organic semiconductors:
    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=
    8062197

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/(SICI)1521-4095(199812%
    2910:17%3C1431::AID-ADMA1431%3E3.0.CO;2-4/abstract

    while the Nikon patent is about a setup with multiple dichroic mirrors:
    http://www.dpreview.com/news/2007/8/9/nikonimagesensor

    But there are no commercial products (except for Foveon, which uses a different
    technique). So have all these (non-Foveon) approaches resulted in failures?
     
    Alfred Molon, Apr 13, 2014
    #1
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  2. Alfred Molon

    Guest Guest

    so far, yes. the tradeoffs are not worth it and they might never be.

    the benefit (higher chroma resolution) isn't anything humans can see
    anyway, and to get that requires giving up stuff they *can* see,
    including luminance resolution, dynamic range, cost to manufacture,
    speed of processing and more. it's a very bad deal.

    even foveon agrees, which is why their new sensor is 'bayer-ish', where
    it interpolates nearby pixels. it's actually rather amusing how much
    they have to backpedal on their claims now.

    bayer is an ideal tradeoff for human generation and consumption of
    images and it's going to be *really* hard to beat.
     
    Guest, Apr 13, 2014
    #2
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  3. Alfred Molon

    Paul Ciszek Guest

    I saw an article recently about a new sensor type involving graphene
    "cones" on top of a backdrop pixel. You would get single color
    information from the cone, and "everything else" information from
    the backdrop pixel. Best of both worlds?
     
    Paul Ciszek, Apr 14, 2014
    #3
  4. Alfred Molon

    Alfred Molon Guest

    Do you have a URL of it?
     
    Alfred Molon, Apr 14, 2014
    #4
  5. Alfred Molon

    Alan Browne Guest

    Or more worlds.

    Graphene is poised to make major disruptions in electronics and
    materials over the coming decade - it's unlikely that it won't have
    several photography applications.
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 15, 2014
    #5
  6. Alfred Molon

    Paul Ciszek Guest

    No, I can't find it, darn it.
     
    Paul Ciszek, Apr 16, 2014
    #6
  7. Alfred Molon

    RichA Guest

     
    RichA, Apr 16, 2014
    #7
  8. Alfred Molon

    charles Guest

    charles, Apr 19, 2014
    #8
  9. Alfred Molon

    Paul Ciszek Guest

    Paul Ciszek, Apr 19, 2014
    #9
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