Getting started with photography question

Discussion in 'Photography' started by ss_betty, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. ss_betty

    ss_betty Guest

    My sister has always been really interested in photography. She has
    produced a handful of wedding videos, but what whe really wants to do
    is be a wedding photographer. She has a daytime job and doesn't think
    she would have time to take classes. Any suggestions?
     
    ss_betty, Sep 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. I'm not a wedding photog nor a professional photog, but what I'd do if I
    wanted to get into it is do a lot of reading on the internet and the library
    and then find myself a gig as an assistant to a pro wedding photog. Learn
    the business, what's expected, what to charge, what equipment she needs to
    have, etc. This of course assumes she knows the basic of photography. If
    not then she has another road to travel long before thinking about being a
    wedding photog pro or otherwise.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Sep 18, 2005
    #2
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  3. ss_betty

    Melody Guest

    Sometimes it's possible to intern for a professional wedding photographer.
    Have her call around & ask some of the local "bigshots" and see if they're
    interested in hiring an intern or an assistant. Some pay (typically minimum
    wage) while others do not, but the experience acquired is typically well
    worth it.
     
    Melody, Sep 18, 2005
    #3
  4. ss_betty

    DBLEXPOSURE Guest


    I agree, hook up with sombody who could use a hand, she might even off to
    work for free, for a while. this will prove how passionate she really is
    about it. Ask question, take picturs, get a good SLR and learn. I would
    imagine one could spend hours surfing the net looking at wedding shots. A
    good way to learn the difference between, bad, good and exceptional.

    http://imagequest.netfirms.com/
     
    DBLEXPOSURE, Sep 18, 2005
    #4
  5. ss_betty

    Alex Guest

    Good suggestion, except for the part about offering to work for free.
     
    Alex, Sep 18, 2005
    #5
  6. ss_betty

    DBLEXPOSURE Guest

    You pay for education, right?
     
    DBLEXPOSURE, Sep 18, 2005
    #6
  7. ss_betty

    Pap Guest

    Pap, Sep 18, 2005
    #7
  8. ss_betty

    Alex Guest

    Not for on-the-job training though.
     
    Alex, Sep 19, 2005
    #8
  9. ss_betty

    DBLEXPOSURE Guest

    I thought the goal was to learn about wedding photography. The way I
    see it, You can pay to take some photography class that may or may not be
    worth it, or, Get on the job hands on experience and knowledge. Asking for
    pay to learn, will only limit her options. If she can afford to put some
    time in without out pay and hooks up with the rite photographer, the money
    will come in time. the odds of hooking up with that , "rite photographer"
    will be better if she isn't looking for a job but looking for knowledge in
    exchange for assistance.....


    http://imagequest.netfirms.com
     
    DBLEXPOSURE, Sep 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Well, and she won't be *paying* the other person to be allowed
    to work for them -- she will be "paying" for her education: she
    does not pay with money, but with her time, spent on assistance
    tasks; in exchange for that "payment" she's doing, she will
    receive an education -- training, teachings from someone that
    knows about what she wants to learn.

    Or, look at it this other way: it's an exchange of goods of
    presumably equivalent value -- the usual way it goes is that
    the exchanged goods are: the "good" that she's giving is her
    work and her time; the "good" that she receives is money, in
    an amountconsistent with the value of the good that she gave
    in exchange. Well, what the other poster is suggesting is
    *exactly* the same as this: she will be receiving goods with
    the exact same value in exchange for the goods she gave;
    except that the goods that she receives are not money, but
    photography lessons -- photography lessons *do have value*;
    this sort of lessons could potentially have a lot more value
    than those she would receive in a regular class on an
    Institute or Art School; and she would have to pay a lot
    for those.

    I really fail to see why you don't see the perfect logic in
    that.

    Carlos
    --
     
    Carlos Moreno, Sep 19, 2005
    #10
  11. ss_betty

    UC Guest

    Many moons ago, I sold a 35mm camera to a young lady. She is now a
    full-time professional wedding and portrait photographer.

    http://www.lambertphotographs.com/video.htm

    There are seminars on wedding photography, and I urge anyone who wishes
    to take up this profession to seek out such seminars.
     
    UC, Sep 19, 2005
    #11
  12. ss_betty

    Guest Guest


    In my experience, working as a slave implies that you are worthless, always
    charge for your sweat, no matter what the 'master' is teaching you.
     
    Guest, Sep 19, 2005
    #12
  13. ss_betty

    Pap Guest

    DBLEXPOSURE is right. Very few photographers would be willing to pay a
    tagalong the first couple of times out. They usually have an assistant or
    second shooter, but will allow a tagalong to get some experience. The
    tagalong needs the pro a lot more than the pro needs them.


    in message
     
    Pap, Sep 19, 2005
    #13
  14. ss_betty

    DBLEXPOSURE Guest

    I say again, the payment is knowledge. There will be more opportunities
    available to those that are passionate about learning if they are willing to
    put in some time in exchange for knowledge. Interns work all the time for
    free. the truth is if they are college interns they are paying the
    university to find them a place to intern. It is not a new concept. The
    money will come in time.
     
    DBLEXPOSURE, Sep 19, 2005
    #14
  15. ss_betty

    Chris Down Guest

    I agree 100%.. and this was the point I was making in another thread on a
    similar topic where you "DBLEXPOSURE" seemed to make the opposite point.
    With anything, but particularly wedding photography you need a sound
    education and real expereience before you start taking money off people.
    If you really want to learn you will earn for free.

    Weddings are tricky beacuse they are highly emotional. Sure a photographer
    can mess up a more expensive job (in cash terms), but mess up a wedding and
    you make a lot of enemies. There is no second chance where you can get a
    better pro in to sort the mess of the first one. The skills needed seem to
    be as much interpersonal as photographic.

    Just as an aside. My own wedding was shot by a very experienced pro who
    had shot weddings for at least a couple of decades. She also happened to
    be a long time friend of my mother. The weather on the day was poor
    with wind and rain so the photos had to be taken indoors, the venue was not
    ideal for photos inside and its beautiful gardens were soaked. The
    photos were OK, but really nothing special. My mother has not spoken to the
    photograper since as she felt let down. All the photographer really got
    wrong was not having a backup plan for bad weather.

    I have shot most of my friends' weddings, but never as the "formal"
    photographer. In almost every case they have liked my informal pictures of
    people relaxed and enjoying themselves more than the formals. The two
    sorts of photo are very different and would never want responsibility for
    the formal shots.
     
    Chris Down, Sep 23, 2005
    #15
  16. ss_betty

    DBLEXPOSURE Guest


    I have not contradicted myself in any way. I never said that seeking
    knowledge was a bad idea. I did however say that trying to scare somebody
    away or ridicule them for asking questions was immature. I also said you
    have the right to try and make a living doing anything you choose. How you
    go about that is up to the individual. Einstein dropped out of high school,
    Plenty of educated men and women have become complete failures at their
    profession. My point is, do not judge.
     
    DBLEXPOSURE, Sep 23, 2005
    #16
  17. ss_betty

    Skinner1 Guest

    Yes.....

    But you don't tote the professior's book to and from his classes for
    the privledge of being taught either.
     
    Skinner1, Sep 24, 2005
    #17
  18. ss_betty

    DBLEXPOSURE Guest

    No, you made student lone payments instead.. Allot of degrees require
    internships, Most internships do not pay.

    There is no argument against this idea that is not a none starter.....

    But if you would like, get out the phone book and start calling wedding
    shooters out of the blue and ask em if they'll teach and pay you. Then,
    try it my way.. I wonder which will yield results..


    Keep on keeping on............
     
    DBLEXPOSURE, Sep 24, 2005
    #18
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