Got four new and used lenses - first impressions

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Siddhartha Jain, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. Bought four new and used lenses in two lots
    - Canon 85mm f1.8 USM
    ==================
    Bought it used. Paid US$290 for this and the Tokina on eBay(India). As
    expected, nice lens with fast and silent AF, bright viewfinder with
    f1.8 and sharp photos. Bought it mainly to sell it off on ebay(US) as I
    found it cheap on ebay(India)

    - Tokina 300mm f4 ATX
    =================
    Rarely seen lens. I guess Tokina soon released the f2.8 version and
    discontinued the f4 version. Build is very nice, sharp photos but slow
    & noisy AF. Surprisingly, manual focus over-ride works in AF mode but
    you can feel that the gear is still engaged. Focus becomes smoother
    once you switch to MF. Intend to sell this one off too.

    - Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 HSM
    ======================
    Bought new. This lens is a joy. Fast and silent AF, sharp photos and
    nice colour and contrast. The build is nice too. Only crib is that
    after I put the Hoya MC ultra-thin filter's cap the lens hood won't
    come-off or on. I have to remove the filter cap to mount or dismount
    the hood. The lens cap can't be used once you put on the ultra-thin
    filter.

    - Mamiya Sekor 60mm f2.8 1:1 Macro
    ===========================
    This is the surprise lens of the lot. Bought for $68 off ebay(US). The
    barrel is so scratched that my cousin who brought it thought its a junk
    lens. First surprise was that it can be used as a normal lens. I was
    under the impression that macro lens can only be used for macro
    photography. The viewfinder view at f2.8 is BRIGHT, focus is smooth and
    build is nice. The only thing that confused me is that it has two
    aperture rings in the front of the lens' barrel (unlike the Pentax
    Takumar 50mm f1.4 that has a single aperture ring on the back of the
    barrel). Although, I haven't had the time to see photos taken with this
    lens but something tells me this a really good lens. The seller claimed
    that it outperformed his Micro Nikkor 55mm!!

    Now that I have a bagful of lenses (Canon 18-55mm, Sigma 24-135mm,
    Sigma 70-300mm, Jupiter 200mm f4 M42 mount and Pentax SMC Super Takumar
    50mm f1.4 M42 mount), I intend to soon put up a lens test page :)

    - Siddhartha
     
    Siddhartha Jain, Dec 1, 2005
    #1
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  2. Siddhartha Jain

    dylan Guest

    I like the 85mm 1.8, nice and sharp, I use mine regularly. US$290 doesn't
    sound that cheap, only $340 (£270) new.

    Cheers
     
    dylan, Dec 1, 2005
    #2
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  3. I paid $290 for this and the Tokina, both put together. So thats $145
    for the Canon :)

    - Siddhartha
     
    Siddhartha Jain, Dec 1, 2005
    #3
  4. Siddhartha Jain

    dylan Guest

    D'oh !. I must read more.
     
    dylan, Dec 1, 2005
    #4
  5. It is a nice lens; surprised you want to sell it.
    Most ultra-thin filters I have seen have no female thread at the front,
    so any cap which relies on gripping the threads is a non-starter. I
    presume this is done (a) to reduce the thickness of the filter itself,
    and (b) to discourage the uninitiated from putting a second filter on
    the outside.
    I wonder if this is an old pre-set diaphragm lens. I know it's a long
    time since Mamiya made 35mm equipment, though I'm not familiar with it.
    In the 1970s it was quite common to find lenses on which the user had to
    manually stop down after metering. If this is the case here, one ring
    (the pre-set ring) will have click stops on which you pre-set the
    aperture you have determined; the other (the stop-down ring) will rotate
    freely and move the diaphragm between wide open and the aperture set on
    the pre-set ring. Then you can focus wide open, and quickly rotate the
    stop-down ring all the way to the pre-set stop to take the photo. It was
    an advance on totally manual diaphragm lenses, but only just! Still, if
    it takes sharp photos, and you are using it for static subjects, it
    should be perfectly usable.

    You should be able to determine if this supposition is correct by
    playing with the two rings; the effects should be quite visible looking
    through the lens.

    David
     
    David Littlewood, Dec 1, 2005
    #5
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