Hard Drive vs Mini DV

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by mike, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. mike

    mike Guest

    In terms of picture quality, can the cheapest HD (£300) match budget
    DVs (£200)
    -indoor and out,
    -good and low light?

    or is it up to individual taste?

    Secondly as HD camcorders use USB, does this mean there is no loss of
    quality when transfered to PC for editing?

    Are there any Mini DVs where transfer to PC does not entail a loss in
    quality?

    cheers

    mike
     
    mike, Mar 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. mike

    Trev Guest

    In terms of picture quality, can the cheapest HD (£300) match budget
    DVs (£200)
    -indoor and out,
    -good and low light?

    or is it up to individual taste?

    Secondly as HD camcorders use USB, does this mean there is no loss of
    quality when transfered to PC for editing?

    Are there any Mini DVs where transfer to PC does not entail a loss in
    quality?

    cheers

    mike

    HD means compressing to MPEG 2 during recording and so a lose of quality.
    Weather you see the difference is another mater.

    DV is the next best to pro DV and has no lose of quality

    There should be no lose in quality when transferring. A DV uses firewire as
    a rule so that editing application can form a two way connection. this
    allows the application to control the camcorder to start stop ect.
     
    Trev, Mar 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. mike

    Tony Morgan Guest

    All of them.
     
    Tony Morgan, Mar 14, 2007
    #3
  4. mike

    Becky Guest

    Can you tell me Tony how i would transfer to my PC without any loss in
    quality from a JVC dv camcorder i have that doesnt have a firewire socket ??
     
    Becky, Mar 14, 2007
    #4
  5. mike

    Trev Guest

    There would be no further lose, but it may not be as fast.
     
    Trev, Mar 14, 2007
    #5
  6. mike

    John Russell Guest

    Hard Drives are relatively more expensive than DV VCR mechanisms, which
    after years of production are incredibly good and much cheaper than they
    where. To offset the higher cost of the hard drive they have to use cheaper
    components elsewhere, such as using optics found in the bottom end of the DV
    range. Combine this with the use of poor MPEG2 encoders and you end up with
    poor recordings even before you think of transferring them to PC.
     
    John Russell, Mar 14, 2007
    #6
  7. mike

    Tony Morgan Guest

    Sorry I can't help you there. I haven't come across or heard of any
    miniDV camcorders without firewire.

    What's the model that you have?
     
    Tony Morgan, Mar 14, 2007
    #7
  8. mike

    Tony Morgan Guest

    I thought that to prevent losing frames, you had to be able to transfer
    at least as fast as the data spools off the tape. Your hard disk also
    has to be able to keep up with the data streaming off the tape (another
    cause of dropped frames).

    That's why a lot of people used to recommend using a second HDD, to
    avoid dropped frames, though with today's faster HDDs it's not usually a
    problem.
     
    Tony Morgan, Mar 14, 2007
    #8
  9. Are you sure it's a dv camera? I thought Firewire was pretty much
    synonymous with dv? What model camera is it?

    Are you maybe confused by the Firewire port being labeled as i-Link?
    It's the same thing.
     
    Laurence Payne, Mar 15, 2007
    #9
  10. mike

    Becky Guest

    Sure, its the JVC-DV1, has no I-link or firewire connection.
    cheers
     
    Becky, Mar 15, 2007
    #10
  11. mike

    Arny Krueger Guest

    Use USB?
    Shouldn't be a problem.
    Shouldn't be a problem.

    Like pounding tacks with an air hammer.
    Agreed.
     
    Arny Krueger, Mar 15, 2007
    #11
  12. mike

    Tony Morgan Guest

    The thought has just occurred to me that chances are that the JVC-DV1
    doesn't have USB2. Up until relatively recently all camcorders came with
    USB(1) and not USB2.

    In which case, I imagine that there is a problem moving DV into your PC
    at the required rate.

    Didn't the JVC-DV1 have an (optional) docking station to provide
    firewire connectivity?
     
    Tony Morgan, Mar 15, 2007
    #12
  13. mike

    John Russell Guest

    That was a transition product of the mid 90's. It was for those who wanted
    the extra quality of DV, but where used to editing for tape using tape.
     
    John Russell, Mar 15, 2007
    #13
  14. mike

    mike Guest

    thanks for your comments: the reason is I'm looking for a budget
    camcorder (about £200) to film indoors (wedding and reception). its
    not got to be perfect but i dont want the result looking like
    something off an 80s you've been framed with smudgy faces or worst
    car chases sort of thing. And lastly, i want to edit and burn the
    result to dvd. Are cheaper Mini DVs up to this sort of indoor filming
    with variable lighting?

    Reading around it seems that while Panasonic (GS27B) is cheap and
    popular, Sony (DCR SR40?) camcorders seem to be better rated for
    indoor use.

    thanks again

    mike
     
    mike, Mar 16, 2007
    #14
  15. mike

    John Russell Guest

    You get what you pay for I'm afraid. Low Light performance is one of those
    things which improve as you go up the range in any make. A cheap camcorder
    can get praised for it's low light performance, but they forget to add "in
    it's class". Being the "best in it's class" dosn't make it good!
    If recording video indoors without additional lighting is you primary need I
    suggest you consider something a little more expensive that gets good
    reviews for that. Today that usualy means 3 CCD camcorders, although the
    Sony Large CCD camcorders come close in doors.
     
    John Russell, Mar 16, 2007
    #15
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