HDR (Photomatix) from the one photograph.

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Peter Jason, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    I have been going over some of my old
    photographs, especially the contrasty ones,
    to try and redeem them.

    If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    two photos from one, one with the shadows
    fixed, and one with the highlights darkened,
    and then combine them with Photomatix, then
    I get a presentable whole.

    Has anyone used this method too, because it
    saves the tedious layering process in PS.

    Is there some sort of downside?

    PJ
     
    Peter Jason, Nov 16, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Peter Jason

    Douglas Guest

    I'm not sure what you find about Photoshop's HDR that drives you to
    Photomatix. You can use HDR in Photoshop with one image. Just develop
    high and low, save as TIFF files and use them. I frequently do it when I
    need to recover blown highlights.

    Douglas
     
    Douglas, Nov 17, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements


  3. Well, those are without a doubt the must ass with terd ugly things I have
    ever seen.

    The Spider
     
    The Spider Formally Seated Next To Little Miss Muf, Nov 17, 2007
    #3
  4. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    Thanks, this is what I had in mind. I
    photograph buildings and this produced high
    contrast when the sun is shining.
    Normally I wait for an overcast day to get in
    all the detail, but this method might save
    some trouble.

    DxO Optics Pro v4 has some form of
    optimization, but I do not know if they use
    this one.
     
    Peter Jason, Nov 17, 2007
    #4
  5. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    "Douglas" <>
    wrote in message
    I have not yet tried the one in PS, but I
    will.
     
    Peter Jason, Nov 17, 2007
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.