Help with HF100 vs HV20 camcorder

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by powesmith, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. powesmith

    powesmith Guest

    Totally new to this, trying to decide between Canon HV20 and HF100.
    HF100 offers a very attractive form factor. My main concern is AVCHD
    encoding. Without spending hours of research I am trying to
    understand if there are any drawbacks as compared to HDV offered by
    HV20. The thing that confuses me the most is that it appears AVCHD is
    geared towards blue-ray disk format. So if I have HD gear, does this
    means that I have to decompress AVCHD and compress it as HD? Is there
    a loss in quality visible to a naked eye? Most likely I won’t be doing
    editing, I will just be dumping it on DVD so that it could be viewed
    in the HD DVD and/or regular DVD players. Another thought is that HV20
    by default offers a long term storage solution assuming the same tape
    is not used over and over again. Any thoughts, comments would be
    greatly appreciated.
     
    powesmith, Jun 11, 2008
    #1
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  2. powesmith

    Smarty Guest

    This is a bit complex and a lot has already been written on the web on your
    specific questions, so my answer will be brief:

    I own and use both HV20 and HF100 cameras, and have compared them
    extensively. As you have stated, the HF100 is a bit smaller, and the
    greatest current HF100 drawback is the AVCHD format which is presently
    difficult to edit and distribute. Unlike tape-based HDV cameras like the
    HV20, it also requires either SD cards or hard disk space to back up your
    footage.

    AVCHD is a more highly compressed format than HDV and requires a much more
    powerful PC to play it back smoothly. It also shows more artifacts when high
    speed motion is being recorded. The two cameras are mostly similar in other
    respects.

    Presently you can play back AVCHD content on some BluRay players and the
    Playstation 3 without recompression. You can do the same with HDV content
    when burning BluRay disks which play on all BluRay players. The image
    quality from both cameras is quite similar, but they do differ, and I would
    refer you to camcorderinfo.com and Google to enumerate the specific
    differences which do exist in low light performance, handling of very bright
    highlights, focusing, artifacts from motion, control features, etc. The
    forum on DVInfo is also full of good information:

    http://dvinfo.net/conf/forumdisplay.php?f=133

    If I could own only 1 of the 2, my choice would be the HV20, since it is
    only slightly larger, takes better pictures, is easier to edit, and has
    better archival storage for only $100 bucks more than the HF100. Your
    mileage may vary.


    Hope this is helpful.

    Smarty


    Totally new to this, trying to decide between Canon HV20 and HF100.
    HF100 offers a very attractive form factor. My main concern is AVCHD
    encoding. Without spending hours of research I am trying to
    understand if there are any drawbacks as compared to HDV offered by
    HV20. The thing that confuses me the most is that it appears AVCHD is
    geared towards blue-ray disk format. So if I have HD gear, does this
    means that I have to decompress AVCHD and compress it as HD? Is there
    a loss in quality visible to a naked eye? Most likely I won’t be doing
    editing, I will just be dumping it on DVD so that it could be viewed
    in the HD DVD and/or regular DVD players. Another thought is that HV20
    by default offers a long term storage solution assuming the same tape
    is not used over and over again. Any thoughts, comments would be
    greatly appreciated.
     
    Smarty, Jun 11, 2008
    #2
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  3. powesmith

    powesmith Guest

    Smarty,
    I did a little bit of homework prior to posting, but you nailed it
    down. Thank you very much. Just to make sure I understand, AVCHD and
    HDV can be both played on blue-ray. AVCHD has to be converted to play
    on HD player?
     
    powesmith, Jun 11, 2008
    #3
  4. powesmith

    Smarty Guest

    Not all BluRay players will play AVCHD files. HDV can be played on all
    BluRay players but a true BluRay disk (recorded using a BluRay burner) is
    required to author these disks.

    HD DVD players can play HDV content without any transcoding / quality loss
    whatsoever but AVCHD does not to transcoded. Further, the HD DVD format,
    despite some technical advantages, is no longer being supported. (Having
    hundreds of HD DVDs I authored and several HD DVD players here and with
    family members, this is a huge disappointment for me personally.)


    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Jun 11, 2008
    #4
  5. powesmith

    powesmith Guest

    Thank you. Looks like a beginning of a long journey for me.
     
    powesmith, Jun 11, 2008
    #5
  6. powesmith

    Smarty Guest

    Glad to help. Either camera will deliver very impressive video quality,
    often exceeding what you experience on most high def broadcasts from cable
    or satellite. Rest assured that either camera will be a good choice, and
    also that many other users are sharing experiences on the web. I wanted to
    correct an inadvertent typo in my prior reply, which incorrectly stated: "HD
    DVD players can play HDV content without any transcoding / quality loss
    whatsoever but AVCHD does not to transcoded." but was intended to say: "HD
    DVD players can play HDV content without any transcoding / quality loss
    whatsoever but AVCHD does need to be transcoded. " Sorry for the error.

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Jun 12, 2008
    #6
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