Here is two I forgot to submit to SI :Street:

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Sebnem, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Sebnem

    Sebnem Guest

    Sebnem, Jan 8, 2013
    #1
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  2. Sebnem

    Savageduck Guest


    Excuses, excuses, excuses!

    Both of those would have worked very nicely.
    I might have suggested a couple of crops to each, and perhaps a few
    other tweaks running around my head, but they will do as stand alone
    shots.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 8, 2013
    #2
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  3. Sebnem

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Get closer. There's too much in the frame. Like the one below, it
    could be improved by cropping vertically just to the right of the blue
    sign.

    I cropped it down to just the woman and the vertical elements in the
    building beside her. It's not that good an image because the woman is
    not in focus, but it reduces the scene to something the eye can take
    it.

    Here's my version:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/9akk2459ktppkym/Main street2.jpg

    The idea of a lone person in this type of setting is good. It shows
    you're looking for shots.

    Cropping this to the vertical (portrait) right at the drainpipe would
    help this considerably. You have too many colors going here. The
    whitish stucco grabs too much attention. It would be good to lighten
    up, or bring out, the woman just a little if you have the software to
    do this.

    Here's my version:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/remk7fia0j37tlh/Lady2.jpg

    Any scene with a lot of bright areas and a lot of dark areas tends to
    be hard on the eye. Too much included in a scene reduces the impact
    of your subject.

    Both your shots are too soft. If you get closer and focus on the main
    element, you should end up with a sharper shot.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 8, 2013
    #3
  4. Sebnem

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! A crop was needed, but I thought it should be moved to include
    some stuff to the left to leave a context item in the image.
    This one is more difficult to deal with due to the centered subject. It
    is tough to come up with a satisfactory crop. Here is my version, but I
    am not particularly happy with it.
    Agreed. However these captures are a reasonable starting point, and the
    seed for good "street" photography is all there.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 9, 2013
    #4
  5. Sebnem

    Peter Guest

    I like Tony's version. The repetitive columns provide a nice leading
    line. the wjoman gives an interesting break.
    Looks like a lifer in an exercise cage.
     
    Peter, Jan 9, 2013
    #5
  6. Sebnem

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Tue, 8 Jan 2013 13:18:42 -0800 (PST), Sebnem
    :
    : >First I have to admit I was kind of hoping to see a more exciting bunch.
    : >
    : >Here is two which I completely forgot about. I took these before Christmas + Hogmanay and didn't touch the camera since.
    : >
    : >Both photos taken at a typical main street of a Glasgow town, Rutherglen. My first go at taking photos on street and I will appreciate your honest comments.
    : >
    : >https://www.dropbox.com/s/psskoij9yysa00n/Main street.JPG
    :
    : Get closer. There's too much in the frame. Like the one below, it
    : could be improved by cropping vertically just to the right of the blue
    : sign.
    :
    : I cropped it down to just the woman and the vertical elements in the
    : building beside her. It's not that good an image because the woman is
    : not in focus, but it reduces the scene to something the eye can take
    : it.
    :
    : Here's my version:
    :
    : https://www.dropbox.com/s/9akk2459ktppkym/Main street2.jpg

    Well, OK, but you've made it an entirely different picture. Is yours better?
    It's a matter of individual preference. My take is that your version says
    less, but says what it says better.

    : >https://www.dropbox.com/s/1j8fkgtj49903w1/Lady.JPG
    :
    : The idea of a lone person in this type of setting is good. It shows
    : you're looking for shots.
    :
    : Cropping this to the vertical (portrait) right at the drainpipe would
    : help this considerably. You have too many colors going here. The
    : whitish stucco grabs too much attention. It would be good to lighten
    : up, or bring out, the woman just a little if you have the software to
    : do this.
    :
    : Here's my version:
    :
    : https://www.dropbox.com/s/remk7fia0j37tlh/Lady2.jpg
    :
    : Any scene with a lot of bright areas and a lot of dark areas tends to
    : be hard on the eye. Too much included in a scene reduces the impact
    : of your subject.

    I disagree. Your crop makes the picture less interesting. It needs the bright
    gray, IMO. Charles Hardwidge often pings you for overcropping, and I usually
    think he overstates his case. But I'm coming around to the view that you at
    least overcrop more than you undercrop.

    That said, I think the organization of the three pictures you submitted this
    month is spot on in each case. I have no way of knowing what the originals
    looked like, but their artistic value as presented is unassailable.

    : Both your shots are too soft. If you get closer and focus on the main
    : element, you should end up with a sharper shot.

    For the intended purpose I don't think it matters. I wouldn't have noticed the
    softness and don't think it detracted much, if any, from the pictures.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 9, 2013
    #6
  7. Sebnem

    Savageduck Guest

    I think the tie in is the story being told. Here is a woman dying for a
    cigarette which she can't smoke inside the hairdresser/beauty salon of
    the sign. So she is banished to the sidewalk with her cigarette and her
    phone to text on.
    Well that is my interpretation and I am sticking to it!
    Actually that was all LR4. After I made all the various adjustments and
    the crop I used the Lightroom B&W Toned Preset "Creamtone" as a quick
    conversion.
    I want to find and use the potential in the image, but I have to admit
    I have struggled with it.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 9, 2013
    #7
  8. Sebnem

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I know I tend to crop tight. As I've said before, what doesn't add to
    the image should be taken out. I really think an image should make it
    easy on the viewer in that whatever you present should be there
    without having the eye tugged away by distractions.

    Bright areas attract the eye, and when I see the original image I find
    myself drawn to the white stucco wall. The other two walls lead into
    the image; that one leads out.

    Thank you. Nice to hear. Since much of what I do are grab shots,
    where I have one chance to get the photo, I tend to shoot wide and
    crop tight. I don't have a lot of opportunity to compose in-camera.

    One of these images was shot at f5.0 and the other at f4.0. At those
    f-stops, if the focus point is just a little off the image is soft
    where we don't want it soft. The "Lady" was f 4, 1/500th, ISO 100.
    The f-stop could have been set to give more depth of focus with a
    slower speed and higher ISO. The camera was set to aperture priority.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 9, 2013
    #8
  9. Sebnem

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Now that I have LR4, I'll have to try some of the pre-sets. I've
    never tried any.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 9, 2013
    #9
  10. Sebnem

    Sebnem Guest

    Agreed, I thought it was too busy but didn't think of a tighter crop. This is a great improvement on the original though I kind of prefer Duck's version, I thought the link between this woman and the hair dresser was an obvious one.
    I was walking back to my car, putting the camera back in my bag. I saw thiswoman waiting for someone down the lane and thought I had to take her picture. I don't know how you approach to these things but I felt uncomfortabletaking her picture so I looked at the settings, approximately aimed the camera and clicked.
    Your version again is a big improvement, thanks a lot.
    Thanks again
    Regards
    Sebnem
     
    Sebnem, Jan 9, 2013
    #10
  11. Sebnem

    Sebnem Guest

    I just wrote to Tony I would prefer your version because of the story. The original was too busy, I don't know why I didn't crop.
    This looks like a different picture altogether, definitely a better one.
    Thanks a lot for your comments and all the work both you and Tony put into demonstrating how to make most of these images.
    Regards
    Sebnem
     
    Sebnem, Jan 9, 2013
    #11
  12. Sebnem

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Here's a beauty shop patron:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/mzulwze9x2zfe7x/2010-03-04-1.jpg
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 9, 2013
    #12
  13. Sebnem

    Sebnem Guest

    Yep, she is definitely having her hair dressed :)

    Sebnem
     
    Sebnem, Jan 9, 2013
    #13
  14. Sebnem

    Peter Guest

    I use CS65. the ACR develop engine in CS6 is supposedly the same as LR4.
     
    Peter, Jan 9, 2013
    #14
  15. Sebnem

    Savageduck Guest

    It is.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 9, 2013
    #15
  16. Sebnem

    Tony Cooper Guest

    To the best of my knowledge, the LR presets are not importable into
    CS6. Actions that produce the same results (if you can figure out how
    to do it) can be used in CS6. Pre-sets can be set in CS6. But, I
    don't think there's a way to bring that Creamsicle pre-set into CS6.

    In LR, you can edit in PS but I don't see a way, in PS, to edit in LR.

    Maybe I'm just not familiar with what can be done.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 9, 2013
    #16
  17. Sebnem

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! While there are many actions others have produce available online
    (& some of those provided by psd-dude over at alt.graphics.photoshop).
    However I have found that if you have cooked up a particular recipe
    which works for you and you don't want to guess when repeating it,
    recording an action is your best approach.
    Actually presets can be set in ACR base on adjustments you have made
    for certain conditions or images in ACR.
    Also OnOne Software provide free presets for ACR.
    ....er, "creamtone".
    Only if you save your PS work as a PSD or Tiff and import that saved
    file into LR.
    If you do a "save as" in PS and know the location of your LR
    directories, you can direct the save to a folder in LR rather than a
    straight import as there will be no DNG conversion. Then you can apply
    LR specific adjustments.
    BTW: Matt Kloskowski and OnOne provide free presets for LR.
    < http://kelbytv.com/lightroomkillertips/ >
    and
    < http://www.ononesoftware.com/products/lightroom-presets/ >
     
    Savageduck, Jan 9, 2013
    #17
  18. Sebnem

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Yeah, I know I can do that. I also know I can open a file in LR,
    apply a pre-set like Creamsicle, and then edit it in PS.

    Haven't you ever heard of a "Creamsicle"? Like a Dreamcicle, but the
    Dreamsicle has ice milk inside and the Creamsicle has ice cream
    inside. It's better.

    http://www.popsicle.com/product/category/107662/creamsicle
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 9, 2013
    #18
  19. Sebnem

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! There are many ways to achieve an end with LR & CS.
    I have seen those in the freezer section, but I have never had a
    hankering to test taste. I lean to the Fudgesicle spectrum of
    inexpensive frozen delights.

    BTW: The free Onone ACR presets are not available for CS6 yet, and note
    that the LR4 set is different to the earlier LR presets.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 9, 2013
    #19
  20. Sebnem

    Peter Guest

    Bring the image into PS as a smart object. It will be editible in PS,
    ACR and LR.
     
    Peter, Jan 10, 2013
    #20
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