Highlight & Shadow detail

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by frankg, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. frankg

    frankg Guest

    I've been asked by a client to prepare photos so that Shadows do not fall
    below 5, and Highlights do not fall above 250. Shall I do this in Levels and
    set the Output level numbers to 5 & 250 respectively, or is there a better
    way?
     
    frankg, Jan 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. It depends on your starting point. If you can do it in the scan software
    or in the RAW converter, that is the better way. If you have to work on
    an image already in Photoshop, setting the output in Levels is indeed a
    good method.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Jan 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. frankg

    frankg Guest

    In Adobe Camera raw settings there isnt one for Highlight, or is it there
    under a different name ? How would you do this in the RAW process?
     
    frankg, Jan 28, 2006
    #3
  4. frankg

    Mike Russell Guest

    Yes, there's a better way. You can simply scale your entire image to the
    5-250 range, but this will result in less snap in some situations.

    Highlight and shadow are special terms that mean areas with important
    detail. Some areas of your image that do not contain important detail can
    be allowed to go to pure white or pure black. An example would be a
    specular highlight, the disc of the sun, a black cave entrance, or the
    treadmarks on a tire. The highlight and shadow should also contain no
    color. Dan Margulis covers this concept very well in his Professional
    Photoshop book.
    Use Camera Raw to get close to the final image, and do your final changes in
    Photoshop.
     
    Mike Russell, Jan 28, 2006
    #4
  5. frankg

    frankg Guest

    "Yes, there's a better way. You can simply scale your entire image to the
    5-250 range"
    Where and how do you scale?
     
    frankg, Jan 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Lower the exposure.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Jan 29, 2006
    #6
  7. frankg

    MoioM Guest

    :
    : >
    : >> I've been asked by a client to prepare photos so that Shadows do not
    fall
    : >> below 5, and Highlights do not fall above 250. Shall I do this in
    Levels
    : >> and set the Output level numbers to 5 & 250 respectively, or is there
    a
    : >> better way? <
    : >
    : > Yes, there's a better way. You can simply scale your entire image to
    the
    : > 5-250 range, but this will result in less snap in some situations.
    : >
    : > Highlight and shadow are special terms that mean areas with important
    : > detail. Some areas of your image that do not contain important detail
    can
    : > be allowed to go to pure white or pure black. An example would be a
    : > specular highlight, the disc of the sun, a black cave entrance, or the
    : > treadmarks on a tire. The highlight and shadow should also contain no
    : > color. Dan Margulis covers this concept very well in his Professional
    : > Photoshop book.
    : >
    : >> In Adobe Camera raw settings there isnt one for Highlight, or is it
    there
    : >> under a different name ? How would you do this in the RAW process? <
    : >
    : > Use Camera Raw to get close to the final image, and do your final
    changes
    : > in Photoshop.
    : > --
    : "Yes, there's a better way. You can simply scale your entire image to the
    : 5-250 range"
    : Where and how do you scale?

    If you are stuck with Photoshop, the advise here will help but if you can
    stretch to a dedicated application like "ICorrect, Edit Lab Pro" it is
    pretty much all done for you if you choose auto mode. This is unfortunately
    for many PS users, a dedicated program, not a PS plug-in but regardless, it
    is a truly amazing way to control the dynamic range of an image file.
     
    MoioM, Jan 29, 2006
    #7
  8. frankg

    MoioM Guest

    I just revisited this issue and found a remarkable easy way to handle this.
    The latest ACDSee 8 Pro. handles most RAW files and has a fantastic slider
    control to help you see the areas outside the range you specify. Once you
    can see the out of range areas, they are easy to control. You can download a
    free trial version and get a 30 day key for it.

    This program incidentally is one of the best image management programs I've
    come across. It's only drawback is Windows. 'twould be nice in Mac clothing.
     
    MoioM, Jan 29, 2006
    #8
  9. frankg

    frankg Guest

    lowering the exposure to say -5 will bring down the highlight value to 250?
    I was under the impression it mainly affects the mid tones.
    And moving the shadows up to +5 will keep the shadows above 5.
     
    frankg, Jan 30, 2006
    #9
  10. frankg

    PacMan Guest

    If you're talking a single channel photo - grayscale,
    set it to 5-250, and in the levels output is easiest. Curves can do
    it, but more complex.

    If you're talking color photos on a pre-press, you need at least 20
    shadow and 242 highlights.
    Unless you get specs from printer, you're good with these.

    It's always best to confirm in photoshop with the eyedropper and info palette.
    Never trust camera raw or any other utility since they will pick the
    highest and darkest point in the image. WRONG
    For printing on a pre-press, your trying to get the highlight and
    shadow clipping in the areas that you WANT
    detail to print...
    If you have a black border at 0, why would you set it to 5? if you have
    a spectral white shine on skintone..
    why would you set it to 250 ? Utitlities are mechanical and have no
    sense of what needs to print detail and what doesn't.
    It takes experience.

    If you have to convert RGB to CMYK, for godsake's set it to US sheetfed
    or US web coated, depending on the pres
     
    PacMan, Jan 30, 2006
    #10
  11. frankg

    Mike Russell Guest

    ....
    What he said. PacMan has got the power dot and all the blue ghosts with
    this one. Pure black and white have their place on press, shadow and
    highlight are different concepts, and refer to areas with detail and no
    color.
     
    Mike Russell, Jan 30, 2006
    #11
  12. No, Brightness moves the midtones. Exposure moves everything.
    No. Moving shadows up to 5 will clip the shadows at 5. Play with
    contrast and brightness.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Jan 30, 2006
    #12
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