How do I change CS4 Color Bit Depth Default

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by flip, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. flip

    flip Guest

    Today when I started Photoshop the photograph didn't look right. After a
    while I realized it was starting in 8 bit color mode. And even
    photographs I know are not 8 bit open as 8 bit. I have reset the
    preferences to default at start up and that doesn't help. Anybody
    experience this problem and/or know how to correct it. I have been to
    the Adobe website but can't seem to find any references to my problem.
    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks, flip
     
    flip, Feb 27, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Just choose 16 bits in the 'New document' dialog.
    That is not possible. Photoshop will never do that.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Feb 27, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. flip

    Joel Guest

    Unless you zoom in very very close or doing some editing on low-rez or
    damaged image, you shouldn't see much or any difference.

    *If* you can see with your very own eyes without trying, then I guess you
    have the GRAPHIC CARD setup incorrectly. This is Windows' duty and you
    should be able to change to Hi-Rez color mode.

    IOW, it's not Photoshop but the graphics card setting.
     
    Joel, Feb 27, 2011
    #3
  4. flip

    Rob Guest

    adding to that your monitor is 6bit color.
     
    Rob, Feb 27, 2011
    #4
  5. flip

    flip Guest


    I found out that my new graphics card wasn't playing well with my
    default monitor profile.

    Good call.

    Thanks, flip
     
    flip, Feb 27, 2011
    #5
  6. flip

    Joel Guest

    I think íts your setting. Your whatever graphic card may not give the max
    your monitor can do, but it should be able to give 32-bit mode.
     
    Joel, Feb 28, 2011
    #6
  7. flip

    darkman Guest

    Think I can help.....Open Photoshop, click 'File, Open As, and Fill in
    Camera Raw as your opening setting. Navigate to any old JPEG, open it in
    Raw. At the bottom of the Raw Workspace, between the button, is a blue
    link that will derscribe colorspace, PPI settings etc. Double-click on
    that, and it will open your Workflow Options dialog. Look for the
    'Depth' box, and it should say '8 bits per channel.' click on the
    pull-down to the right, and the 16 bit option should be visible. clock
    on that, hit OK, and you're home free.
     
    darkman, Mar 24, 2011
    #7
  8. No, that won't help him a bit. His problem is (was) with the graphics card
    settings. That has nothing to do with opening images in 16 bits per color
    rather than 8 bits per color. It's also useless to open an 8 bits image as
    16 bits. You only increase the size of the container, but the content
    remains the same. It's like pouring one gallon of water in a two gallow
    container. You can do that and it doesn't hurt, but it won't increase the
    amount of water you've got.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Mar 25, 2011
    #8
  9. flip

    Joel Guest

    You are very right about the graphic card issue, but not very right about
    8-Bit MODE vs 16-Bit or 32-Bit MODE.

    By using your same sample about the bucket

    1. With 10 Galon bucket you may not be able to hold many large ROCK

    2. But with the exact same 10 Galon bucket it can hold lot of regular SAND
    and ir can hold even more of very FINE SAND (the type of samd using for sand
    blashing).

    So, if you run into some JPG being abused by some RAW expert (like messing
    up some color channel, more noise, out of wax etc.) and you need to do some
    retouching on the damaged 8-Bit image. Then try to change it ti 16-bit or
    32-bit mode and you should see the difference. I only work on 16-bit mode,
    and they are poor low-rez photos I download from internet (for DVD label) so
    I don't care much about the small detail. Or I never worked on 32-bit mode
    to know much about it, and my regular work I work on 8-bit hi-rez photos.
     
    Joel, Mar 25, 2011
    #9
  10. flip

    Kele Guest

    I'm guessing you're both correct. Expanding from 8 to 16 bits doesn't
    increase the photo's detail; it does increase the amount of available
    information. It divides the same 8 bit pixels into 16 bits - still no
    improvement in perceived detail. But if the photo is subsequently adjusted,
    lets say with a filter, the filter's algorithm has 16 bits to work with
    potentially yielding a more detailed result.





    You are very right about the graphic card issue, but not very right about
    8-Bit MODE vs 16-Bit or 32-Bit MODE.

    By using your same sample about the bucket

    1. With 10 Galon bucket you may not be able to hold many large ROCK

    2. But with the exact same 10 Galon bucket it can hold lot of regular SAND
    and ir can hold even more of very FINE SAND (the type of samd using for sand
    blashing).

    So, if you run into some JPG being abused by some RAW expert (like messing
    up some color channel, more noise, out of wax etc.) and you need to do some
    retouching on the damaged 8-Bit image. Then try to change it ti 16-bit or
    32-bit mode and you should see the difference. I only work on 16-bit mode,
    and they are poor low-rez photos I download from internet (for DVD label) so
    I don't care much about the small detail. Or I never worked on 32-bit mode
    to know much about it, and my regular work I work on 8-bit hi-rez photos.
     
    Kele, Mar 25, 2011
    #10
  11. flip

    darkman Guest


    I will say I'm glad I tried to help - there's a lot about Photoshop
    that probably Abobe isn't even really aware of. The back and forth
    afterward (yup - in here) made me realize how vast this stuff is. One
    thing - working in 16-bit right out of a RAW image - isn't that where
    the advantage lies? I can see where a low-res JPEG can't be helped.

    Darkman
     
    darkman, Mar 26, 2011
    #11
  12. Correct. The true advantage of high bit editting lies in working in 16 bits
    from the start. A RAW file is usually 12 bits or 14 bits, so working in 16
    bits (Photoshop can't work in 12 bits or 14 bits, only in 8, 16 or 32 bits)
    retains all that information.

    Yes, you can argue that there is a slight advantage of opening an 8 bits
    image in 16 bits in some cases, but that advantage is only slight. You are
    only talking about rounding errors (image editting is just mathematics),
    not about real extra information.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Mar 26, 2011
    #12
  13. flip

    Joel Guest

    Well, you are talking about 16-bit file, RAW file, and I am talking about
    16-bit MODE. Those are 3 different beats
     
    Joel, Mar 27, 2011
    #13
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.