How do you guys pick a monitor?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Dallas, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. Dallas

    Dallas Guest

    I decided to treat myself to a 27" second display, just because I've
    been such a good boy this year...

    This $259 Viewsonic seems like very good price (maybe too good/cheap):
    http://tinyurl.com/86y3g8k


    Trouble is... how can you find out if it's worthy for photography and
    post processing? I just had the recent experience of a new laptop and
    the on-board display has very narrow viewing angles and the whites are
    a bright blue white that I can't seem to adjust out because of the
    limited capabilities of the on-board graphics card. Basically, I just
    experienced what can go wrong and I what to avoid that in the new
    desktop I'm building.

    (BTW, the new computer would have a high end NVIDIA card in it.)
     
    Dallas, Jun 23, 2012
    #1
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  2. most probably.
    "3ms response time" sounds like a TN panel. Not good.
    Personally, I'd look at prad.de, in this case, starting at
    http://www.prad.de/new/monitore/kaufberatung/kaufberatung-teil8.html
    (recommended 27" for graphics/photo applications), but then
    I do read German.
    TN display.
    Look for an IPS display --- they're not the contrastiest (they
    don't produce the blackest black), but they do not shift colors
    and brightness and contrast a lot as the viewing angle changes.
    Probably a ca. 9300K white.
    Do invest into hardware for colour calibration. That (and correct
    software) will correct that problem and many others (albeit
    at some cost to the available colour steps and contrast and
    maximum brightness). Otherwise your colour accuracy is between
    way off base and just guessed (and still wrong). And you don't
    get correct whitepoints and correct brightness etc.

    Also, your monitor is likely way too bright, you want something
    between 80 and 120 candela/m² --- not 300. Not all monitors
    can be tuned down that way by e.g. varying the PWM-width of the
    backlight --- just making all pixels less transmissive at full
    white reduces the number of steps available for displaying the
    image ...
    Lots of reading is needed.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jun 26, 2012
    #2
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  3. Dallas

    Dallas Guest

    Yes, thank you.. I'm finding this isn't as easy as I thought...
     
    Dallas, Jun 29, 2012
    #3
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