How much time on DVD?

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Srm72499, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. Srm72499

    Srm72499 Guest

    I always thought that I'd be able to get about 2 hrs of AVIs onto a DVD by
    using MyDVD (software that came with computer) - howeverk I still can't get
    more than just a little over an hour onto the final disk (58 min took 3.7 Gb).
    I do belive that MyDVD compresses somehow... Whats going on, and how do I get
    the extra minutes (and do I pay a price in quality)? Thanks.
    -teve
     
    Srm72499, Dec 9, 2003
    #1
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  2. Srm72499

    luminos Guest

    The time on a DVD is largely controlled by the software...the disc capacity
    is constant.

    MyDVD re-encodes the audio to linear PCM (thereby uncompressing the
    compressed audio), taking up huge space. It is a dog program.

    Try out Ulead DVD MovieFactory 2 (there is a trial) that keeps the audio in
    compressed format. You will be
    able to get nearly 2 hours.
     
    luminos, Dec 9, 2003
    #2
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  3. Srm72499

    Melchizedek Guest

    The time on a DVD is largely controlled by the software...the disc capacity
    is constant.

    MyDVD re-encodes the audio to linear PCM (thereby uncompressing the
    compressed audio), taking up huge space. It is a dog program.

    Try out Ulead DVD MovieFactory 2 (there is a trial) that keeps the audio in
    compressed format. You will be
    able to get nearly 2 hours.

    --- Also try neoDVD5+ - which allows up to 5+ hours on a single DVD-R.
     
    Melchizedek, Dec 9, 2003
    #3
  4. Go read here http://www.dvdrhelp.com


    John Thomas Smith
    http://www.direct2usales.com
    http://www.pacifier.com/~jtsmith
     
    John Thomas Smith, Dec 9, 2003
    #4
  5. Srm72499

    Samuel Paik Guest

    If all you put on the DVD is video, then you can get at least an hour
    of video. The most I've ever put on a DVD was about 7 hours. It all
    depends on the material and how much you compress--the more compression,
    the lower the quality.

    Try using a separate MPEG-2 compressor, it will give you a lot more
    control.

    TMPGEnc: <http://www.pegasys-inc.com/>
    MainConcept: <http://www.mainconcept.com/>
    CinemaCraft CCE Basic: <http://www.cinemacraft.com/>

    Sam
     
    Samuel Paik, Dec 9, 2003
    #5
  6. Srm72499

    Lindsten Guest

    If you use CBR 8000 kbits/s you'll get very close to one hour of video. The
    audio is a non issue. If you need more video on the DVD, use VBR and set
    average to something in the range of 4000. I'm using TMPGEnc for converting
    from AVI to MPEG2 (creates separate WAV file) and it works great.
     
    Lindsten, Dec 9, 2003
    #6
  7. Srm72499

    Nomen Nescio Guest

    You can get more than that if you use the proper software.
    I'm not sure about that software. I've used it a couple times, found it
    extremely lacking and deleted it.
    Use different software or RTFM to determine how, if possible, to adjust the
    audio/video compression ratios. Two hours is easy to fit onto a 4.38GB
    DVD-R.

    Encode the video using DVD-compliant VBR MPEG-2 compression (min=192Kb/s,
    avg=4871Kb/s, max=8Mb/s) while encoding the audio using Dolby Digital
    (AC-3) audio at 192Kb/s. This will just fit without going over, and the
    quality should be pretty good provided you start with high-quality source
    and use high-quality encoders.

    FWIW, I've fit up to nearly 5 hours of DVD-Video onto a single 4.38GB DVD-R
    using 1.856Kb/s of DVD-compliant CBR MPEG-1 video compression along with
    192Kb/s of Dolby Digital (AC-3) audio. This provides video quality
    somewhere in between that of VCD and SVCD, and standard DVD-Video quality
    audio.

    Also, it appears that Sonic's MyDVD does not support Dolby Digital (AC-3)
    audio <http://www.sonic.com/products/mydvd/faq/default.asp>, so you would
    be forced to use LPCM or MPEG-1, Layer II audio (MP2). The former (LPCM)
    is uncompressed so uses a ton of bandwidth/storage space. And while the
    latter (MP2) is compressed, it is not an approved standard for NTSC
    DVD-Video, so use at your own risk.
     
    Nomen Nescio, Dec 10, 2003
    #7
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