how to check out a used camera?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by 257roberts, Jan 20, 2004.

  1. 257roberts

    257roberts Guest

    Hi there,

    I just bought a used Canon Rebel "G" for my son. The seller has given
    me 14 days to check it. If any of you are familiar with this camera,
    could you help me to figure out how to do a "quick and dirty" test
    with a couple of rolls of film? I think the camera is okay and I have
    a old Yashica 35mm that I know how to work pretty well. Thanks for
    your suggestions.
     
    257roberts, Jan 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. 257roberts

    Paul Guest

    : Hi there,
    :
    : I just bought a used Canon Rebel "G" for my son. The seller has given
    : me 14 days to check it. If any of you are familiar with this camera,
    : could you help me to figure out how to do a "quick and dirty" test
    : with a couple of rolls of film? I think the camera is okay and I have
    : a old Yashica 35mm that I know how to work pretty well. Thanks for
    : your suggestions.

    Some general ideas, not specific to Canon:

    Shoot some slide film, both with ambient light and with flash, and check the
    slides carefully for exposure accuracy. If you shoot only negative film, you
    run the risk of having inaccurate exposure masked by corrections made during
    printing. (This assumes you're no better at evaluating negatives than I am,
    which may not be true.)

    Also, I'd shoot a series of "correct" exposures of the same subject under
    the same lighting conditions, but using different combinations of shutter
    speed and aperture. If you don't get consistent exposures, you might have a
    problem.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 20, 2004
    #2
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  3. 257roberts

    MikeWhy Guest

    I'd also check the curtain sync by flashing at faster shutter speeds, 1/250
    if the sync speed is 1/125. Checking the strip width against 1/500 and
    1/1000 gives an indication if the second shutter is sticking or not. It
    shouldn't be a problem with the recent vintage, but it's an easy check.

    Shoot the lens wide open against an evenly lit background to check for
    alignment or damage. I doubt they can whack it out of alignment without
    external evidence, but again it's so easy and obvious to do to ignore. You
    can also give a quick check of edge sharpness if the subject has some
    texture; a convenient brick wall can also help spot gross distortions.
     
    MikeWhy, Jan 21, 2004
    #3
  4. 257roberts

    brougham5 Guest

    I'm going to suggest something really weird.

    Go use the camera like you normally would. Take the film to be developed
    wherever you normally do. If you are happy with the results, then great.

    The problem with taking pictures of blank walls is that unless you are very
    perceptive, you will see a all that looks evenly lit, but it's not. When
    you take a picture, the camera will see the unevenly lit wall. When you get
    the pictures back, you'll see the unevenly lit wall. Does that mean the
    camerea isn't working?

    Assuming you can create an evenly lit wall and that you expose it perfectly,
    you'll still see imperfections. Consumer grade lenses may create pictures
    that are slightly darker around the edges than in the center. This is
    noticeable when you have a gray wall, but not so noticeable in the pictures
    that you most likely take normally.
     
    brougham5, Jan 21, 2004
    #4
  5. 257roberts

    257roberts Guest

    Hi there,

    I understood the first poster which suggested the slide film. I guess
    the lab doesn't monkey with the film as much as they do w/prints. I'm
    not sure what you are suggesting with higher than normal sync speeds,
    though. I'm guessing you are saying to shoot the edge of the brick
    wall to see if it's in focus? How about shooting a fan blade to see
    if the shutter speed is anywhere near what it's supposed to be.
    thanks again
     
    257roberts, Jan 21, 2004
    #5
  6. 257roberts

    Bob Hickey Guest

    Then you have to know exactly how fast the fan is spinning. I just open the
    back, set the shutter to the sync. speed and fire the flash. If you see a
    perfect circle, OK. Set one stop faster and there should be a small flat
    spot. As you go up the flat spot should get bigger. Bob Hickey.
     
    Bob Hickey, Jan 22, 2004
    #6
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