how to clean a lens

Discussion in 'Digital Point & Shoot Camera' started by pug brian, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. pug brian

    pug brian Guest

    hi, not sure if this is the right place to ask this but, i it is for a
    digital camera. a week or so ago i was trying to get some lightning pictures
    and all of a sudden it started to sprinkle so i ran under a door way but it
    was too late, now i have 3 or 4 water drops on the lens of my camera,but
    they only show up in dark pictures. anyways, can anyone tell me how to take
    them off? i havent tryed to clean it yet in fear of breaking my camera lol.
    any help would be greatly appreatiated
     
    pug brian, Oct 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. pug brian

    Paul Heslop Guest

    some will tell you to buy some lens cleaning tissues. They seem quite
    expensive but are probably worth it. I bought one of those little lens
    pens. I used it about twice and thought it was doing a brilliant job,
    but the third time I found it was sticking and the little pad had coe
    off the end, so I was rubbing rubber on my lens!

    I just use a very soft lens cleaning cloth as rarely as possible, and
    good old breath.

    I would say if you have an expensive lens use the best method, which
    is supposedly the lens tissues. You can get these online or from a
    local camera shop
     
    Paul Heslop, Oct 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. pug brian

    pug brian Guest

    ok thank you :) can i use cloth for glasses? or something like tissue? this
    lens is stuck to the camera and very hard to get to, i would even try my
    breath and a q-tip if that would be ok?
     
    pug brian, Oct 19, 2005
    #3
  4. pug brian

    Paul Heslop Guest

    I use a cloth for glasses but very gently, and give it a flick to make
    sure you have no loose lint... also check your lens edges for specks
    of anything that could scratch the glass. I tend to fold the cloth and
    use a small nub of the middle section, with a little breath on the
    glass first. If it still looks a bit dodgy give it another go.

    I can't say for q-tips but judging from the scratches I've had on my
    itchy ears with some I wouldn't recommend them.

    I think the lens cleaning tissues are treated and very soft, but as
    they're quite expensive I haven't been tempted. I suppose if this was
    an £800 slr or something I would but one thing to remember, don't use
    your shirt tails! :O)
     
    Paul Heslop, Oct 19, 2005
    #4
  5. i have 3 or 4 water drops on the lens of my camera,but they only show
    They are a good way to grind abrasive dirt particles over your lens and
    scratch it irreversibly.

    The best stuff is stripping film - a UK brand is Opticlean. It's
    a polymer solution that comes in a bottle with an applicator brush,
    looking like nail polish. You paint it onto the whole lens surface,
    let it dry, and press a sticky tab down onto it. Pull the tab off
    and the dried film comes too, taking the dirt with it. With lenses
    you only use infrequently, you can leave the film in place and
    strip it off before use to guarantee an absolutely clean surface.

    ============== j-c ====== @ ====== purr . demon . co . uk ==============
    Jack Campin: 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland | tel 0131 660 4760
    <http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/jack/> for CD-ROMs and free | fax 0870 0554 975
    stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, & Mac logic fonts | mob 07800 739 557
     
    Jack Campin - bogus address, Oct 19, 2005
    #5
  6. pug brian

    pug brian Guest

    ok thank you very much, ill use the cloth for glasses but really really
    gently,i dont have money to buy anything so that will have to do, im just
    tired of seeing those spots on the pictures

    I use a cloth for glasses but very gently, and give it a flick to make
    sure you have no loose lint... also check your lens edges for specks
    of anything that could scratch the glass. I tend to fold the cloth and
    use a small nub of the middle section, with a little breath on the
    glass first. If it still looks a bit dodgy give it another go.

    I can't say for q-tips but judging from the scratches I've had on my
    itchy ears with some I wouldn't recommend them.

    I think the lens cleaning tissues are treated and very soft, but as
    they're quite expensive I haven't been tempted. I suppose if this was
    an £800 slr or something I would but one thing to remember, don't use
    your shirt tails! :O)
     
    pug brian, Oct 19, 2005
    #6
  7. pug brian

    pug brian Guest

    that would probably work but my lens extends and it goes in kinda deep so i
    dont think id be able to use anything like that, ill just try the cloth for
    glasses.i learned my lesson lol .and the next camera i get is gonna have a
    bigger lens

    557
     
    pug brian, Oct 19, 2005
    #7
  8. pug brian

    Paul Heslop Guest

    The film sounds very interesting, but I'm sure brian is savvy enough
    to check for crud before he cleans his lens.
     
    Paul Heslop, Oct 19, 2005
    #8
  9. pug brian

    Whiskers Guest

    snip
    The technique for using the lens tissues, is to roll or fold into a tube
    and then tear the end off and use the torn edge as a very soft brush - the
    only pressure you put on the lens is the 'springiness' in the tissue itself.
    They are made so that when torn, the edge has a large number of fine
    fibres. They cost far less than a new lens!

    If used very very gently, the micro-fibre cloths sold in opticians' shops
    are tolerable - again, with no pressure beyond the 'springiness' in the
    fabric. A danger with them is that they may have tiny particles of grit
    embedded in the fabric - especially if not new.
     
    Whiskers, Oct 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Water spots might not be what you are seeing on your pictures. Hot breath
    followed by a soft tissue (no Aloe!) is all most folks use.
     
    Charles Schuler, Oct 19, 2005
    #10
  11. pug brian

    pug brian Guest

    ok thanks everyone, im gonna have to think this over a while in my mind
    before trying anything, i just got this camera and i dont want to mess it
    up, i can deal with the spots til i figure out what to do :) no night shots
    for me lol
     
    pug brian, Oct 20, 2005
    #11
  12. pug brian

    Paul Heslop Guest

    :O) That's rather like I do with the cloth, but obviously I don't
    tear a bit off
    Yeah. I tend to keep mine in their little packet and give them a good
    flick. I'm pretty careful but I should invest in some tissues really
     
    Paul Heslop, Oct 20, 2005
    #12
  13. pug brian

    Ronald Hands Guest

    Compared to the price of your camera, they're quite cheap.

    I've followed the lens cleaning recommendations with Kodak tissues
    for many years and have not, to my knowledge, scratched a lens yet.
    The standard procedure is, first, use a lens brush to blow off any
    loose dust and debris.
    Then fold a lens tissue (they're lint-free, by the way, not just
    soft) and put a drop or two of lens cleaning fluid on the tissue, not
    directly on the lens. Wipe the tissue gently from centre to outer
    perimeter of lens in a circular motion. Then use another lens tissue to
    remove any remaining moisure. There shouldn't be much since the
    cleaning fluid is used sparingly. One bottle will last a lifetime.
    I suspect most of the lens cleaning fluids sold in photo stores are
    simply a very dilute detergent. I used to work for a newspaper, and I
    seem to recall that the photographers there used alcohol to clean
    lenses. I've never been tempted to go that far.


    -- Ron
     
    Ronald Hands, Nov 14, 2005
    #13
  14. pug brian

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Interesting, Ron. Thanks for the info.
     
    Paul Heslop, Nov 14, 2005
    #14
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