How to simulate macro photography of models on real photos in Photoshop

Discussion in 'Photoshop Tutorials' started by Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. Hi All,

    I've just posted a tutorial on how, in Photoshop, to turn a photo of the
    real world into one that looks like it is a macro shot of a model
    railway or similar construction for a bit of fun:
    <http://www.dimagemaker.com/article.php?articleID=850>

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 20, 2007
    #1
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  2. Wayne J. Cosshall

    ronviers Guest

    Nice job Wayne. Now if I just had access to the set of Mel Brooks'
    'Silent Movie'.

    Thanks,
    Ron
     
    ronviers, Jan 20, 2007
    #2
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  3. LOLOLOLOL

    Make one.
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 20, 2007
    #3
  4. Wayne J. Cosshall

    ronviers Guest


    Perfect - Baudrillard would be proud.
     
    ronviers, Jan 20, 2007
    #4
  5. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Mike Fields Guest

    Interesting ! I remember seeing an interview several years ago with
    the guy who used to do the photography for the Lionel Train layouts.
    He would use (if I remember correctly) a pinhole "lens" and about
    a 20 minute exposure to get the depth of field needed to keep the
    entire layout in focus -- sort of the reverse of your effect :)

    mikey
     
    Mike Fields, Jan 20, 2007
    #5
  6. Wayne J. Cosshall

    KatWoman Guest

    very cute!!

    I have used that technique on photos of humans not to simulate macro but to
    give a more telephoto look to snapshots shot with normal lens where I found
    the background too sharply focused
    sometimes when I drop in fake backgrounds

    I also found you can shoot a similar look with a cute lens I saw advertised
    call lens baby
    it has a bellows as in old 4x5 cameras
    http://www.lensbabies.com/index.php?r=GSLensbaby
     
    KatWoman, Jan 20, 2007
    #6
  7. Nice work.
     
    Brion K. Lienhart, Jan 20, 2007
    #7
  8. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Quintsys Guest

    Wayne J. Cosshall schreef:
    So funny, what you actually do is analogous to making real flowers look
    like fake ones.


    I remember from years and years ago that they called it 'table top
    photography' or so.

    Carlo (very old)
     
    Quintsys, Jan 20, 2007
    #8
  9. Wayne J. Cosshall

    dicktay Guest

    dicktay, Jan 20, 2007
    #9
  10. Thanks all, glad you are enjoying it. I had fun. I find it so wonderful
    that we have these expensive and wonderful cameras and lenses and then
    we play with them, use lensbabies, etc and rough the image up. This is
    what I love about photography.

    BTW I've added a link on the bottom of each article page to go to a
    printable version of the page. I hadn't realised they weren't printing,
    at least for some people.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 21, 2007
    #10
  11. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Leigh Taylor Guest

    Would it be fair to say you ripped this off... sorry, took inspiration
    from, this article, published last month?:

    http://forums.livingwithstyle.com/showthread.php?t=342065

    If you're going to recycle someone else's work so blatantly, you should
    at least credit them.
     
    Leigh Taylor, Jan 21, 2007
    #11
  12. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Rutger Guest

    Goodness me, this could be done much easyer:

    Select a rectangle of the part you whish to stay sharp with a feather of
    about 5 - 10% of the max pixelheight or pixelwidth.
    Select-inverse.
    Gaussian blur to your own liking.

    Finished.

    Rutger
     
    Rutger, Jan 21, 2007
    #12
  13. Hi Leigh,

    No I hadn't seen that one. I'd looked around some months ago to see what
    people were doing with the technique. I hadn't found a site with a clear
    technique that was worth quoting a link to.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 21, 2007
    #13
  14. Yes, but you may not get the control you need with more complex images.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 21, 2007
    #14
  15. Hi Leigh,

    Just to add to that. The early work I found seemed to, from memory, be
    someone in Japan. I thought about adding links to what I had found but
    assumed anyone interested would do a Google anyway.

    What I mean by having not found any I wanted to quote back when I did
    the original research is that I had not found anyone who was doing more
    complex scenes. the guy in Japan, for example, was doing views from
    highrise buildings, from memory, where the simple blur approach works.

    If you want I'll add links to the new one you pointed out and some of
    the older ones I found?

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 21, 2007
    #15
  16. Links added. I think you'll see a number that give the basic technique.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jan 21, 2007
    #16
  17. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Fat Sam Guest

    I don't see why not.
     
    Fat Sam, Jan 21, 2007
    #17
  18. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Mark² Guest

    It takes more than just blurring to be effective. Notice the change in
    height, and other perspective illusions...
     
    Mark², Jan 24, 2007
    #18
  19. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Mark² Guest

    Surely you realize that there are countless Photoshop experts the world
    over, and that some of them explore similar concepts. It's rather "blatant"
    of you to make this accusation when he clearly is using different image
    examples, and has created his own graphics to demonstrate every aspect of
    the process he describes.

    How many articles do you supposed there are to explain the use of layers?
    Did they all steal each other's stuff?

    Sheesh.
     
    Mark², Jan 24, 2007
    #19
  20. Wayne J. Cosshall

    Mark² Guest

    Surely you realize that there are countless Photoshop experts the world
    over, and that some of them explore similar concepts. It's rather "blatant"
    of you to make this accusation when he clearly is using different image
    examples, and has created his own graphics to demonstrate every aspect of
    the process he describes.

    How many articles do you supposed there are to explain the use of layers?
    Did they all steal each other's stuff?

    Sheesh.
     
    Mark², Jan 24, 2007
    #20
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