How to tell DPI a digital camera can produce before purchase?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by davidg, Oct 30, 2007.

  1. davidg

    davidg Guest

    I want to buy a digital camera that can produce publication quality,
    digital images of at least 300DPI (Dots Per Inch) when 4-5 inches at
    100-percent. How do I tell from the published specs of a digital
    camera whether it should be able to do this?

    David
     
    davidg, Oct 30, 2007
    #1
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  2. davidg

    Joel Guest

    No, you DO NOT need to find those information as it doesn't mean anything,
    and you probably won't find any camera has default "300 PPI". You just need
    to pay attention to the "PIXEL" and that will solve 1/2 of your quest.

    It's sad that too many people reading wrong information to get wrong
    expression .. and even sadder when those may spray the wrong knowledge to
    others.
     
    Joel, Oct 30, 2007
    #2
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  3. davidg

    dooey Guest

    300dpi at 6x4 is 1800x1200. (6x300 and 4x300)

    1800x1200=2160000 (2.2mp)

    This tells you the resolution, even phones are more than 2.2 megapixels
    these days. Whether the camera is "publication quality" is a whole different
    story!
     
    dooey, Oct 30, 2007
    #3
  4. davidg

    dj_nme Guest

    That is a reasonable guide ot the minimum comera sensor resolution for
    4"x5" at 300ppi (Pixels Per Inch is for printed images, dpi is "Dot
    PItch" on monitors or "Droplets Per Inch" for inkjet ink-nozzle density).
    In my experience, it is much safer to go for at least twice the minimum
    (about 5mp or 6mp for 4x5 @ 300ppi), as this then allows for cropping
    and/or image enhancement/manipulation with minimal degradation in
    printed image quality.
    It's always better to buy "more" camera than you're totally sure you
    need, rather than cursing the cheaper one after using it a few times.
     
    dj_nme, Oct 30, 2007
    #4
  5. davidg

    ray Guest

    IMHO - if you have to crop half the image, the photo was not properly
    framed in the first place. Either you didn't have enough lens or . . .
     
    ray, Oct 30, 2007
    #5
  6. davidg

    Ron Recer Guest

    DPI has to do with printers and has little to do with camera mega pixels.
    For instance I often print 8.5"x11" photos using 4800x1200 DPI with images
    that are 2650x2048 pixels. With a good printer (at least 1200x1200 DPI) and
    decent images you get good results with 200-300 pixels per inch.

    Ron

    Ron
     
    Ron Recer, Oct 30, 2007
    #6
  7. davidg

    dj_nme Guest

    ....You took a panoramic picture in a single shot and then cropped it to
    suit.
    There is no single & simple correct answer.
     
    dj_nme, Oct 31, 2007
    #7
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