I brought some 35mm film into a local camera store and ...

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by dickr2, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. dickr2

    dickr2 Guest

    While there I checked out the used 35mm cameras for sale.
    Many beautiful Canon EOS, Nikons and others from the 1980s
    and 1990s for sale - cheap! Many of these cameras have some
    things in common like auto advance, auto rewind, LCD displays,
    etc. - and a limited life span - where the camera will die
    shortly after parts are no longer available to repair them.
    Invariably, the camera will die when it contains exposed
    film, and a black bag or dark room is required to remove the
    film.
    Call me old fashioned, but some of those old manual advance,
    manual rewind (in my case Canon A1s) cameras will still be
    functioning long after I go to ... wherever.
    :)
    Dick
     
    dickr2, Jul 29, 2010
    #1
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  2. dickr2

    Noons Guest

    dickr2 wrote,on my timestamp of 30/07/2010 3:42 AM:
    Incredible how similar they are to dslrs, eh?
    Or a closet at home... And if you're into film, invariably you'll have access
    to either a change bag or a closet...
    Aw, you're such a pessimist...
    (FM3A here, and loving it more and more) :)
     
    Noons, Jul 30, 2010
    #2
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  3. dickr2

    dickr2 Guest

    Shiva Das wrote:
    Hi,
    But doesn't the R6 use a battery for the meter? I suppose if the meter
    battery dies one would have to use the "sunny 16 rule", although I can't
    quite remember what that rule was I used it with an old Argus 35 MM
    camera many, many, many years ago.
    :)
    Dick
     
    dickr2, Jul 31, 2010
    #3
  4. dickr2

    Rol_Lei Nut Guest

    Cost of film? I buy it bulk by the metre & roll my own.

    Finding a way to get it developed? Just load it into a tank in my
    bathroom and develop it.

    If *you* can't find an inexpensive & convinient way of doing things
    doesn't mean that it's impossible...
     
    Rol_Lei Nut, Jul 31, 2010
    #4
  5. "Sunny 16": exposure = f/16 at a shutter speed of 1/[ISO speed of film]
    (e.g., 1/100 for Tmax 100).
     
    David Nebenzahl, Jul 31, 2010
    #5
  6. dickr2

    dickr2 Guest

    Hey David,
    You got my memory cells working when you mentioned T-max film.
    Way back in the early 1970s a friend and I attended a photo class
    that lasted for several weeks at a local VoTech. We were issued
    a roll of T-Max 400 each week and when returning the film, we
    received a contact sheet and all the negatives. I still have the
    contact sheets, negatives and some prints I had processed. I still
    remember one of the final classes when the instructor said
    "take some photos in the classroom". We said "Huh?" and then we
    proceeded to take available light photos of the instructor and fellow
    classmates. Yes, I took a few shots of some very attracive young
    ladies, and I suppose they're grandmothers by now.
    Ah, memories.
    Dick
     
    dickr2, Jul 31, 2010
    #6
  7. dickr2

    Rol_Lei Nut Guest

    <Snip>

    Not to be a memory-pooper, but T-Max only came out in the second
    half/end of the 1980s.

    You're probably thinking of Tri-X (also 400 ISO/ASA)
     
    Rol_Lei Nut, Jul 31, 2010
    #7
  8. dickr2

    dickr2 Guest

    You're probably right - what I miss most is my ... memory.
    Thanks,
    Dick
     
    dickr2, Jul 31, 2010
    #8
  9. dickr2

    dickr2 Guest

    rwalker wrote:
    Are you foolin' us?
    On a serious note, I still have 8 mm movies taken in the 1940s along
    with a Revere projector that still works and a Cinemaster 8 mm camera.
    As I recall, the camera was loaded with 16 mm film with sprocket holes
    on both edges. When the film was processed, it was split into two
    8 mm strips with sprocket holes on one edge. I'll have to dig out those
    movies one of these days, but I'm sure some of the splices have let go
    over the years. I still have the device to splice the film, but the
    liquid used for splicing might not be available.
    Another "to do" item on my list of things to do one of these days.
    :)
    Dick
     
    dickr2, Aug 2, 2010
    #9
  10. No; it isn't easy, but film can be slit at home. People do it. (I'm
    curious how the person does it, specifically.)
    That makes no sense.

    How would that even work? Either you'd have to expose the full 16mm
    frame, therefore getting two half-frame films as a result, which makes
    no sense, or you'd have to have some ultra-complicated scheme which
    would expose first one side of the film, then run it backwards (and move
    the lens) to expose the other side.

    I think your memory is playing tricks on you here.

    By the way, the "liquid" you're talking about for making splices is
    called film cement, and it's still easily available.
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 2, 2010
    #10

  11. No, it was called 8mm movie film, later "regular 8". It was 16mm sized
    movie film. You ran it through the camera twice. The first time exposed
    one side of the film as the frame was only half the width of the film.
    Then you ran it through again, flipping the film over, and exposing the
    second side.

    It was then processed in the same way 16mm movie film was processed. You ended
    up with two 2 minute movies on the film, and they were split in the middle
    and spliced together.

    Bolex made the H8 (which I once owned) that used 100 foot reels of film. It
    was the standard H16 set up for 8mm film instead of 16.

    The also made a version in Super 8. Super 8 was the same film, 16mm, with
    smaller perferations to accomdate the larger frame.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8_mm_film

    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Aug 2, 2010
    #11
  12. dickr2

    K W Hart Guest

    After liquid splices, there was a splice tape developed. If you're just
    going to project them once and convert to an electronic image (VCR, DVD,
    etc), then you could use just about any adhesive tape.
     
    K W Hart, Aug 2, 2010
    #12
  13. dickr2

    K W Hart Guest

    No, it works very well. Or at least many years ago it did. You ran the 25'
    16mm wide film through once, shooting along on edge of the film. Then you
    flipped over the spool and ran the film through again, shooting along the
    other edge of the film. After processing, the film was slit lengthwise and
    spliced end to end, into a 50' length, running about four minutes.

    As for the lengthwise slitters, I've seen such devices on eBay. Basically a
    plastic block with razor blade(s) embedded.
     
    K W Hart, Aug 2, 2010
    #13
  14. dickr2

    dickr2 Guest

    K W Hart wrote:
    Thanks KW, my memory isn't failing ... yet.
    I still have the camera in its original case complete with instructions!

    Dick
     
    dickr2, Aug 3, 2010
    #14
  15. dickr2

    K W Hart Guest

    snip
    Doesn't the camera require a 'framing hole'- a little hole every frame that
    the camera senses and stops the film advancing?
    Actually, years and years ago, I took a little Kodak Tele-Instamatic to a
    night high school football game. I submitted my photos to the local
    newspaper as usual, and they couldn't tell them from my usual work. Of
    course, I limited the shots to mostly sideline action, but still...
    The camera is a machine, and if you understand how the machine works and
    it's capabilities, you get the shot.
     
    K W Hart, Aug 3, 2010
    #15
  16. dickr2

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : : > On 8/2/2010 11:34 AM dickr2 spake thus:
    : >
    : >> rwalker wrote:
    : > >
    : >> <snip>
    : >>
    : >>> I fairly regularly slit 35 mm film down to 110 to reload cassettes to
    : >>> use in my Pentax Auto110.
    : >>
    : >> Are you foolin' us?
    : >
    : > No; it isn't easy, but film can be slit at home. People do it. (I'm
    : > curious how the person does it, specifically.)
    : >
    : >> On a serious note, I still have 8 mm movies taken in the 1940s along
    : >> with a Revere projector that still works and a Cinemaster 8 mm camera.
    : >> As I recall, the camera was loaded with 16 mm film with sprocket holes
    : >> on both edges. When the film was processed, it was split into two
    : >> 8 mm strips with sprocket holes on one edge.
    : >
    : > That makes no sense.
    : >
    : > How would that even work? Either you'd have to expose the full 16mm frame,
    : > therefore getting two half-frame films as a result, which makes no sense,
    : > or you'd have to have some ultra-complicated scheme which would expose
    : > first one side of the film, then run it backwards (and move the lens) to
    : > expose the other side.
    : >
    : > I think your memory is playing tricks on you here.
    : >
    :
    : No, it works very well. Or at least many years ago it did. You ran the 25'
    : 16mm wide film through once, shooting along on edge of the film. Then you
    : flipped over the spool and ran the film through again, shooting along the
    : other edge of the film. After processing, the film was slit lengthwise and
    : spliced end to end, into a 50' length, running about four minutes.
    :
    : As for the lengthwise slitters, I've seen such devices on eBay. Basically a
    : plastic block with razor blade(s) embedded.

    Which, presumably, you have to use in the dark. :^|

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 8, 2010
    #16
  17. dickr2

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    :
    : rwalker wrote:
    : >
    : > On Mon, 02 Aug 2010 13:34:52 -0500, dickr2 <>
    : > wrote:
    : >
    : > >Another "to do" item on my list of things to do one of these days.
    : > >:)
    : > >Dick
    : >
    : > I have one of those, but it keeps getting bigger.
    :
    : God have the grace to permit me to finish my "to do" project list
    : before I die.

    Actually finishing the projects or just finishing the list? The most I could
    possibly aspire to is the latter.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 8, 2010
    #17
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