I don't understand the concept of backup bodies

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Hussam, Oct 16, 2005.

  1. Hussam

    Hussam Guest

    Pardon my ignorance, but I can only think of very few situations where
    one might be needed. To qualify you'd have to be:

    1) A professional photographer working in absolutely extreme settings
    where there is a very high chance the camera will break or malfunction,
    AND
    2) the subject being photographed absolutely cannot wait and the moment
    will never come again
    3) a lot of money and reputation is at stake if you miss a single shot.

    Otherwise, I simply don't understand why anyone (amateurs) would need
    to buy a second "backup" body, yet many speak of their 'backup bodies'
    in news groups and forums... which makes me wonder.

    If my camera breaks, I can buy a replacement that same day. It's not
    the end of the world...but to simply keep a 2nd body around "just in
    case" doesn't make sense (especially with digital cameras depreciating
    in price so fast, it's a waste of money)

    Comments?
     
    Hussam, Oct 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. Hussam

    Pat Guest

    Its a way of justifying the purchase of a new camera every year or so. The
    old one is kept as a backup. I have two backup (old) cameras. I am wishing
    for a new camera. Do you think 3 backups is too much?
     
    Pat, Oct 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Hussam

    Ron Guest

    I own 2 Pentax ist D's. I bought the second one brand new at a knock down
    price when they went on clearance.

    My logic was that if Pentax release a replacement of the D I can sell the
    new unused body (two year old models are currently fetching considerably
    more on Ebay than I paid for a new one)

    If pentax don't produce a D replacement I can continue to use my Pentax
    lenses witout having to resort to a Ds or DL if my current D breaks, gets
    stolen, etc.

    My main concern was to avoid having to buy one of the new Pentax offerings
    because they are such crap.
     
    Ron, Oct 16, 2005
    #3
  4. Hussam

    Alan Browne Guest

    Don't assume that "amateurs" are not serious about their photography.
    One "amateur" I know travels to Asia and/or South America twice a year
    with a main goal of photography. She always carries two bodies with
    her. In real life she's the controller of a very large municipality.

    You mention "a lot of money and reputation..."

    Well imagine driveing two hours to a special spot at a special time of
    year. Amateurs do this all the time and usually have a backup. This is
    not the same as a well equipped snapshooter.

    I know few "serious" amateurs who don't have at least two bodies.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 16, 2005
    #4
  5. Hussam

    Ed Mullikin Guest

    I take photos of groups at Conventions and I have a backup because a failure
    of my regular camera would jeopardize my job. I was in Tibet one time when
    my film camera failed just after landing at Lhasa. I bought a cheap point
    and shoot. I managed to leave that in the cab when I got out at the airport
    so I lost all. I guess the point is that when things go wrong they can go
    really wrong!

     
    Ed Mullikin, Oct 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Hussam

    nick c Guest

    I'm not a Pro. I'm an amateur who for many years have been an avid
    photographer. I have the 20D and the 1DMK2 cameras. I'm considering
    trading off the 20D for another 1DMK 2. Most of the time I use the 1DMK2
    but at times I use both cameras. I don't have both cameras slung around
    my neck all the time but I do keep a long lens on the 20D and shorter
    lenses on the 1DMK2.

    If you had accidentally dropped lenses while attempting to change
    lenses, damaging expensive lenses or loosing a lens over cliffs or in
    salt water, then you would readily see it would be financially
    acceptable to have an additional camera body on hand. Have you
    experienced photographing in dry dusty or high humidity environments?
    Bad enough with film cameras but with digitals, lens changing conditions
    become exacerbated. Sure, there are work around conditions that can be
    used and having used them, I would readily opt for having a second
    camera body.

    As for "wasting money," money may be considered as being wasted when
    spent on items you don't enjoy having. Naturally, throughout life there
    are expenditures that are necessary which aren't exactly joyful.
     
    nick c, Oct 16, 2005
    #6

  7. I give you another good reason for two bodies/backup, and it's why I have
    two.

    Lens switching. I hate it. Dust, Time, Missed shots, and it's simply a
    PITA.

    I was out yesterday and the moment I felt like going from one lens to
    another my backup came out and the lens was mounted.

    Shot a school picnic a few weeks ago, lots of people and lots of ground to
    cover, and was very happy to have my 300D with a 28-135 mounted for those
    close shots along with my 20D w/ a 100-400 mounted for the longer shots that
    I would have missed otherwise.

    BTW, I'm strictly an armature but there's no reason why I can't use
    professional equipment or methods.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 16, 2005
    #7
  8. Hussam

    jean Guest

    Last month on a cycling trip, my 10D started acting up, the power switch
    became flaky and would sometimes not power on the camera, lucky for me, I
    got it going again for the rest of the trip but if it had decided to stop
    working altogether, I would have lost hundreds of pictures which would have
    been just fleeting memories rather than permanent ones. I am looking at
    purchasing a 20D and keeping the 10D as a backup.

    Jean
     
    jean, Oct 16, 2005
    #8
  9. I'm a *former* professional. But with digital, I can't afford to have
    several extra bodies sitting around. My backup these days would be my
    Hasselblads I guess.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Oct 16, 2005
    #9
  10. Hussam

    Frank ess Guest

    I think yours is feigned ignorance. I think you won't learn much from
    "comments" on your comments. I think you know the root of "amateur" is
    "love", and that reason goes out the window.

    If the world you live in advances at such a liesurely pace, and
    external resources are always at hand, and if your own configuration
    of "needs" doesn't demand it, I believe you won't benefit from a
    "backup" body; however, I do _not_ believe you don't "understand the
    concept". I think yours was a rhetorical (read "chickenshit") method
    of presenting your view.

    What did you really want to say?

    --
    Frank S
    --
    Frank ess
    "In this universe there are things
    that just don't yield to thinking
    -plain or fancy-Dude".
    -J. Spicoli, PolyPartyPerson
     
    Frank ess, Oct 16, 2005
    #10
  11. Hussam

    Charlie Self Guest

    First, for a pro, the settings do not need to be extreme. It is always
    cheaper to finish the job, pay the crew, go home and process the
    photos, than it is to start the job, have the camera break, pay the
    crew, arrange for a new set up, come back that day, re-shoot the job,
    pay the crew, etc. The more the set up costs, the better it is to get
    it done right the first time. And then there are those irreplaceable
    moments that may never come again...and that you don't know about until
    they're on you.

    Any mechanical/electronic gear is apt to fail, and, when it does, it
    will fail at theleast opportune times.

    Add that to another simple fact: if my DSLR breaks, I live and work
    somewhere where replacement is going to take at least two days.

    Add that to another simple fact: losing two days out of a working week
    means I don't get paid for those two days. I have no boss who eats my
    expenses and pays my salary when things are slow or equipment is not
    operating.

    For amateurs: I dunno. If you're in the Amazon, shooting photos in the
    rain forest, do you want a back up camera even though you're not
    getting paid to bring out once-in-a-lifetime shots?
     
    Charlie Self, Oct 16, 2005
    #11
  12. Hussam

    jean Guest

    Forgot to mention that where I was cycling there were no camera shops close
    by, some of the hotel rooms did not even have phones so getting a DSLR on a
    moment's notice was really out of the question. BTW, this was not in some
    distant foreign country, just in rural Montana and Idaho.

    Jean
     
    jean, Oct 16, 2005
    #12
  13. Hussam

    Hussam Guest

    I would've replied but given your insults-laced sarcasm, i'll ignore
    your post.

    I think you should drop your shitty attitude and be a good sport. If
    you don't like my questions/comments, then don't respond. We are a
    community of photographers trying to help each other, and simply
    discuss things, not just insult each other if/when we see a comment we
    don't agree with.

    Grow up.

    Sam
     
    Hussam, Oct 16, 2005
    #13
  14. Hussam

    G.T. Guest

    Thin-skinned top-poster. How quaint.

    Greg
     
    G.T., Oct 17, 2005
    #14
  15. Hussam

    Frank ess Guest

    Hm. You still didn't manage to say what you wanted to say, did you?

    What would you have said if you hadn't ignored my post?

    Good sport is as good sport does.

    Is attitude something you have, or something people infer?

    I'm not yet convinced you don't understand the concept of second
    bodies.

    Grown-upness is not a concern of grown-ups.
     
    Frank ess, Oct 17, 2005
    #15
  16. Hussam

    imodan Guest

    Perhaps what he actually meant was 'Why do arrogant dickheads like
    you have 2nd bodies when equipment and not photography is not your main
    objective?' In which case it's not what he said that has been
    obscured, it's the answer.

    Most people on this group are equipment nuts/brand zealots that love
    photography but love the equipment more. They'll argue the toss all day
    about Bayer filters and love nothing more than to engage in a pissing
    match over whether Canon or Nikon is the worlds best equipment.

    I would venture that possession of a second body in the main is because
    well that's what professionals do. Amateur photographers LOVE the look
    of the professional photographers life. Gee...it looks so exciting and
    glamorous, if I buy what he/she buys...maybe just maybe I can feel a
    little about what it's like without ever having to put my work on the
    line because I am an amateur after all.

    Also, it's a common consumer trend. Buy a gigantic industrial looking
    stainless steel cooking range and you'll cook like a pro. Buy a cafe
    style juicer and an expensive coffee machine and you can pretend you
    have your own cafe right at home. And ...buy a second body and you will
    look like a real pro. More often that not, they'll be taking pictures
    of bugs, landscapes, their mates wedding/christening/bar mitzvah and
    the like.


    Without the excuse of being able to shoot different film stock...I'd
    say it's mainly an ego trip or maybe like me when you buy a digi camera
    you know that you'll get sweet fa for it so you'd rather hang on to
    it...you never know when you may use it again.

    Now I'm not saying that there's anything wrong with that...but
    perhaps before you go and give people shit at what you think he is or
    isn't saying...maybe the answer isn't black & white.
     
    imodan, Oct 17, 2005
    #16
  17. Hussam

    Skip M Guest

    In many instances, it is but an excuse not to get rid of the old, faithful
    camera body that you had before. Call it a "back up" instead of "my old
    camera that I'm holding onto for reasons that no one can fathom" and it
    makes a much easier sell for the spouse. Or it gives you an excuse to buy a
    less expensive model that may have higher res, or a large sensor, or
    something you just happen to like that your current camera lacks.
    We use our older cameras to avoid lens changes, but that's only because
    we're time constricted with wedding ceremonies, a circumstance that most non
    pros (in the sense of a pro being someone who earns the preponderance of
    their living at photography) wouldn't run into.
     
    Skip M, Oct 17, 2005
    #17
  18. Hussam

    Pete D Guest

    So middle posting with no snipping is okay?
     
    Pete D, Oct 17, 2005
    #18
  19. Hussam

    G.T. Guest

    I did snip, about 1/4. Just as much as I would have if there was no
    top-post.

    Greg
     
    G.T., Oct 17, 2005
    #19
  20. Hussam

    Hussam Guest

    top poster... middle posting.. snipping... ?

    what the hell are you guys talking about?!
     
    Hussam, Oct 17, 2005
    #20
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