Ilford MGIV Fiber Based paper sorta yellow-ish?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Fountainhead, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Fountainhead

    Fountainhead Guest

    I picked up a 25 sheet package of Ilford MGIV Fiber Based glossy paper.
    I've not used any fiber based papers previously. I cut an 8x10 into test
    strips, then examined one of the unexposed strips under room light. I
    immediately noticed that the Ilford paper definitely had an off-white,
    yellowish tint to it. It was nowhere near as "white" as the RC paper
    that I've used. Is this normal? Also, I know that fiber-based paper has
    a tendency to curl. The paper that I have is already slightly curled in
    the package. Did I get some bad paper, or are these simply
    characteristics of FB paper?

    Thanks.
     
    Fountainhead, Sep 14, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Fountainhead

    Fountainhead Guest

    What I meant was that the *unexposed* paper has a yellowish cast to it,
    and is curled.
     
    Fountainhead, Sep 14, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Sometime humid conditions cause the paper to curl you can "break"
    the paper across a hard edge of a desk table etc to remove curl.
    As for the yellow it could be natural to the emulsion,....in that case it will
    not be yellow once fixed and washed. The paper should be clean white
    if fixed and washed without exposure,......putting the paper in developer
    for 60 seconds, fixing then washing should produce pure white paper
    unless heat fogged, usually the paper comes out grey from that.
     
    No1inparticular, Sep 14, 2003
    #3
  4. Unprocessed emulsion can be quite yellow in color, its
    normal. You may even see some difference in apparent
    contrast of a print in the fixing bath as the unused
    emulsion is dissolved.
    Fiber paper uses a different kind of substrate under the
    emulsion than RC. In RC paper the substrate is the same
    plastic used to coat the back with a dispersion of Titanium
    dioxide in it. Titanium dioxide is about the most reflective
    material there is. Fiber paper has a substrate of one or
    more layers of hard gelatin with a dispersion of Barium
    sulfate (Baryta) in it. Barium sulfate is also very
    reflective but the two substrates do look a bit different.
    Most modern papers also contain an "optical brightener" very
    similar to laundry blueing, which fluoresces under light
    with some ultra-violet in it. They may look a little dull
    under incandescent light, where the brightener may not work.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Sep 14, 2003
    #4
  5. Fountainhead

    Fountainhead Guest

    I attempted a print, and I can now say that both you and No1inparticular
    were correct. After fixing, the yellow cast is gone. Obviously it is
    simply the characteristic of the FB paper.

    Thanks.
     
    Fountainhead, Sep 14, 2003
    #5
  6. Fountainhead

    Daniel ROCHA Guest

    In august I used several 25 shett packages of this paper and never
    noticed
    that !
    Surely not :)
    In my opinion it's bad samples
     
    Daniel ROCHA, Sep 15, 2003
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.