Image Modification

Discussion in 'Photoshop Tutorials' started by Sam Hale, Sep 17, 2004.

  1. Sam Hale

    Sam Hale Guest

    Hey,

    This is the first time I've used google groups, and I found it quite
    hard to find an appropriate group, so sorry if I have put this in the
    wrong one, if it is an you can sugguest a better group, i'd really
    apprechiate it.

    Anyway, I was wondering if theres anyway you split a .jpg into the
    seperate layers once it's been saved and put into one layer.

    For example, if I was to take a photo with a camera, and then add text
    in photoshop, so theres two layers, the image and the text. Then save
    the file and close down photoshop. If I open the image up again, its
    all gone into just one layer, is there anyway of seperating the two
    again, to remove or adjust the text?

    If there is a special problem that you know can do this, please do say
    as i'm open for any sugguestions.

    Thanks,
    Sam.
     
    Sam Hale, Sep 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Sam Hale

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: (Sam Hale)
    Keep a copy as a .psd file (or a layered tiff if using the most recent versions
    of Photoshop) to preserve layers. When you Save As a jpeg it gets flattened.
     
    Bill Hilton, Sep 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. Sam Hale

    Hunt Guest

    This is one of the two correct groups to post PS/image manipulation questions
    - and welcome!

    Bill Hilton has provided the only answer that I know of. The only hope would
    be to use the Healing Brush, or Patch Tool, or the Clone Tool, to rebuild the
    area that is "beneath" the type. The quotes are there because now, there is
    nothing beneath the type any longer. If you can do this, you could then add a
    Text Layer, Save_As PSD, then Save_As JPG. Unfortunately, as stated, once
    Flattened, the area beneath the type is replaced BY the type.

    Sorry,
    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Sep 17, 2004
    #3
  4. Sam Hale

    Tacit Guest

    Anyway, I was wondering if theres anyway you split a .jpg into the
    Absolutely, positively not. No way, no how.

    When you flatten an image, the layer information is *gone*. Forever. The pixels
    beneath the layers are changed. Nothing can restore the original layered image.

    Always save two copies of your images--one in a layered format and one
    flattened.
     
    Tacit, Sep 17, 2004
    #4

  5. This may not answer your specific question, but it is quite an interesting
    topic anyway;

    Dan Margulis has a tutorial at
    http://www.ledet.com/margulis/LABCorrection.pdf Within the article he
    discusses an image on which the text layer has been flattened in the way you
    mention. Look at page 2 for the image and page 4 for the description.
    Incidentally there is an error; Dan says "Suppose that some knucklehead has
    merged and saved the green type into the image...". He means "red type" of
    course. I tried his method and it sort of works but I am not sure that it
    would be much good if the text was black or greyscale rather than colour.

    BTW (Off topic) Dan's book 'Professional Photoshop' is one of the
    'must-have' books that keeps getting mentioned in this NG, but it is a bit
    expensive. With a bit of creative Googling I have been able to find PDF
    versions of several of the chapters on the web, plus other tutorials, giving
    me the chance to use Dan's expertise while remaining the tightwad that I am.
    I might publish a few links if anyone's interested.

    HTH
    John
     
    John Rampling, Sep 17, 2004
    #5

  6. Good link.
     
    Danhiel - SoupOrNews Admin, Sep 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Sam Hale

    Odysseus Guest

    Keep a copy as a .psd file (or a layered tiff if using the most recent
    versions
    of Photoshop) to preserve layers. When you Save As a jpeg it gets flattened.[/QUOTE]

    And, in the case of the JPEG format, it gets not only flattened but
    compressed as well, discarding a great deal of the original information.
    It's best not to use JPEG for any working or 'master' version of a
    document, even without layers.
     
    Odysseus, Sep 17, 2004
    #7
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