Interchangeable focusing screens - which dSLRs ?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by goldtech, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. goldtech

    goldtech Guest

    Hi,

    I been making some expensive mistakes in dSLR purchases and want to
    ask here so I can hopefully avoid hair pulling in the future.

    What dSLRs have interchangeable focusing screens? And have a screens w/
    split-image and micro/multi-prism? I am asking about true user
    interchangeability and a choice of screens from the manufacturer.

    What dSLRs have auto focusing tweaking that the user can do via a
    menu? Some don't have this and required sending back to the service
    center - not good. I need user tweaking if it's ever necessary...

    Thanks, I'm missing these options on my current dSLR and I require
    them.

    Lee G.
     
    goldtech, Apr 29, 2009
    #1
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  2. goldtech

    Me Guest

    Fx Canon models. Perhaps Sony a900?
    But I don't believe it's significantly harder to replace a screen on
    other maker's dslrs with aftermarket "Katz eye" screens.
    IMO split image is close to a total waste of time, as in most
    photography (apart from macro copy work perhaps) the desired focus point
    is never in the centre of the screen, and with shallow DOF where focus
    is critical, "focus and compose" technique is vastly inferior in
    practice than being able to put an (AF) focus point right where you want
    it. Microprism is useless with slow lenses, and it's usually also
    confined to center of the frame around the split image circle.
    YMMV.
    Nikon D300/700/3/3x
    Canon 5dII, 50d and up.
    Sony a900.
    Some pentax / samsung models?
     
    Me, Apr 30, 2009
    #2
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  3. Would you accept AF tweaking via easily accessible AF adjustment
    screws that many users have succesfully done, although strictly
    speaking they're only meant to be adjusted by service personnel? That
    option is available on at least most of the Sony Alpha DSLRs, but of
    course is a global adjustment affecting all lenses. The A900 offers
    lens-specific tweaking by menu.
     
    Chris Malcolm, Apr 30, 2009
    #3
  4. See http://www.katzeyeoptics.com
    I don't think any do, but I may be mistaken.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Apr 30, 2009
    #4
  5. goldtech

    Bob Larter Guest


    Canon 1xx series. Although I have no idea how available the screens are.
    I can't speak for other brands.
     
    Bob Larter, Apr 30, 2009
    #5
  6. goldtech

    Bob Larter Guest

    Canon does. I can't speak for other brands.
     
    Bob Larter, Apr 30, 2009
    #6
  7. goldtech

    DRS Guest

    Why just the 1xx series? My 50D has interchangeable screens. It comes with
    the Ef-A but that can be user swapped for the Ef-D or Ef-S screens.
     
    DRS, Apr 30, 2009
    #7
  8. It depends on what you call "interchangeable" and "harder". There
    are some DSLRs in which you just move a little clip, pull out the old
    screen, drop in the new one, and push the clip back, and just about
    anybody could do that at home. (Most Canons, I think.) There are other
    models for which it's rather more difficult and not recommended for
    anybody who isn't an experienced technician. (Most Olympuses, for
    example..) But they're all "replaceable" in the sense that the screen
    isn't an integral part of the chassis or anything.

    I got an aftermarket focusing screen for my first DSLR, because I
    missed the old split prism. But eventually I came to realize it didn't
    matter that much, and when I got my second DSLR, I didn't bother with
    it and haven't missed it. I'd wait and think carefully about whether
    you really need an aftermarket screen before going ahead and doing it.
    Some people may really need it; I didn't.
     
    Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner, Apr 30, 2009
    #8
  9. goldtech

    Bob Larter Guest

    I only specified the 1xx series because I know for that it's true.
     
    Bob Larter, May 1, 2009
    #9
  10. I think you have been the victim of poor editing in an earlier response.


    Which Canon interchangeable screen has split image and micro-prism? That
    is what the OP was asking for, not just a choice from the manufacturer.

    I believe that the reason so many after-market screens are available
    with split image and micro-prism is because Canon don't offer any
    screens with these features. Its a pity really as all of the
    alternatives interfere with the metering to a greater or lesser degree.
    Presumably if Canon provided such a feature then they could have a CF
    option that would adjust the metering accordingly, as they have with the
    MF screens which don't have these features.
     
    Kennedy McEwen, May 1, 2009
    #10
  11. goldtech

    Pete D Guest

    All Pentax D-SLR's cameras have this feature, there is a range of screens
    from the manufacturer and a range from aftermarket screen makers such as
    KatzEye.

    Personally I prefer microprism over the split screens.
     
    Pete D, May 2, 2009
    #11
  12. goldtech

    Robert Coe Guest

    > goldtech wrote:
    : > > What dSLRs have interchangeable focusing screens?
    : >
    : > But I don't believe it's significantly harder to replace a screen on
    : > other maker's dslrs with aftermarket "Katz eye" screens.
    :
    : It depends on what you call "interchangeable" and "harder". There
    : are some DSLRs in which you just move a little clip, pull out the old
    : screen, drop in the new one, and push the clip back, and just about
    : anybody could do that at home. (Most Canons, I think.) There are other
    : models for which it's rather more difficult and not recommended for
    : anybody who isn't an experienced technician. (Most Olympuses, for
    : example..) But they're all "replaceable" in the sense that the screen
    : isn't an integral part of the chassis or anything.
    :
    : I got an aftermarket focusing screen for my first DSLR, because I
    : missed the old split prism. But eventually I came to realize it didn't
    : matter that much, and when I got my second DSLR, I didn't bother with
    : it and haven't missed it. I'd wait and think carefully about whether
    : you really need an aftermarket screen before going ahead and doing it.
    : Some people may really need it; I didn't.

    In my experience, the biggest advantage of a replacement screen is grid lines
    to help with getting the horizontals and verticals right.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, May 2, 2009
    #12
  13. goldtech

    Bruce Guest


    The Nikon D700 has grid lines that can be turned on and off. You don't
    need to buy a replacement screen.

    On the other hand, the grid lines also work when an aftermarket
    replacement screen is fitted, such as the Katz Eye.
     
    Bruce, May 2, 2009
    #13
  14. goldtech

    Me Guest

    Viewfinder gridlines are standard in most (all?) Nikon dslrs. AFAIK
    Nikon don't offer non-standard screens for any of their dslrs. I think
    that they're on the right track.
     
    Me, May 2, 2009
    #14
  15. goldtech

    Bob Larter Guest

    Bob Larter, May 3, 2009
    #15
  16. goldtech

    Paul Furman Guest

    I got a Katz Eye for my D200 because I use a lot of old manual lenses. I
    decided that I don't really need it for the D700 because it's a bigger
    viewfinder and sometimes an annoying obstruction on the D200, though
    often useful. It's definitely not the sort of thing you would change in
    the field, it requires tweezers & a clean environment to prevent dust
    getting sandwiched in there. I would be curious to try something like
    Alan mentioned for his Sony, 'Acute Matte' but nobody seems to make such
    a thing for Nikons.

    The D200 has optional grid lines too, maybe not the D70 before that? I
    still am pretty bad about keeping the horizon straight :-(



    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, May 3, 2009
    #16
  17. goldtech

    Paul Furman Guest

    I would like to try that but apparently not an option for Nikons.

    No AF or metering problems with my Katz Eye. Well, maybe a very slight
    metering problem... I never really trust the meter anyways, that's what
    the LCD & histogram are for.

    I think the D700 has AF fine tuning but I never saw the need either.


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, May 3, 2009
    #17
  18. goldtech

    Guest Guest

    d70 had grid lines
     
    Guest, May 3, 2009
    #18
  19. goldtech

    Bruce Guest


    The Katz Eye screen for the D700 is different from the Katz Eye screens
    for all other Nikon DSLRs. It is far less obtrusive - just a small
    central split image rangefinder without the surrounding microprism that
    the Katz Eye screens for every other Nikon DSLR share. See the
    comparison here:

    http://www.katzeyeoptics.com/cat--Nikon-DSLRs--cat_nikon.html


    Agreed - clinically clean conditions are required, and it should be
    fitted once only and left in place.


    The Katz Eye screen is described as a "Laser Matte" and I find it
    excellent for focusing, and also for estimating depth of field at
    apertures of f/4 and smaller. The DOF at larger apertures doesn't
    really show, but that's true of just about any SLR focusing screen.

    There isn't yet a version with Optibrite treatment but one is stated to
    be under development.


    I'm not sure how many Nikon DSLRs have the switchable grid lines. The
    D3 definitely doesn't. I don't think the D3X has them either (although
    I would welcome a correction if it does). The first Nikon SLR to be
    fitted with them was the N80/F80.


    <AOL> Me too. </AOL>
     
    Bruce, May 3, 2009
    #19
  20. goldtech

    Guest Guest

    autofocus on the floor of the camera, reflected via a secondary mirror
    behind the main mirror.
    metering is in the prism and could be affected by the screen.
     
    Guest, May 3, 2009
    #20
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