Interesting machinations at Kodak

Discussion in 'Kodak' started by Mark Roberts, Nov 5, 2003.

  1. Mark Roberts

    Mark Roberts Guest

    http://www.democratandchronicle.com/biznews/11053B28U3P_ek05_business.shtml

    "Famed corporate raider Carl C. Icahn is eyeing as much as $500 million
    worth of Eastman Kodak Co. stock, an amount that would make him the
    company’s largest individual investor, Kodak said Tuesday."

    "Icahn’s interest in Kodak stems from the company’s decision to
    accelerate its entry into digital imaging and other new fields, such as
    commercial and home printing and consumer electronics."

    "Historically speaking, Icahn uses his initial stake to begin angling
    for changes. His philosophy is to buy enough shares to draw attention to
    companies he believes are seriously undervalued by Wall Street,
    according to King Icahn, his 1993 unauthorized biography."

    " 'He can only succeed,’ said (marketing consulting) Stevens, 'if
    management of the company has not succeeded.' "
     
    Mark Roberts, Nov 5, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark Roberts

    Deathwalker Guest

    Deathwalker, Nov 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. Mark Roberts

    Mark Herring Guest

    Is that "really good film fuji", or "master of the super-CCD hype
    fuji". I like their film, but their tactics on the digital side are
    annoying.
    **************************
    Mark Herring, Pasadena, Calif.
    Private e-mail: Just say no to "No".
     
    Mark Herring, Nov 5, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark Roberts

    Bowsér Guest

    Icahn is a vulture who will search for companies that can be divided and
    sold in parts, which usually produces more money that the company as a
    whole. He's a scumbag.
     
    Bowsér, Nov 5, 2003
    #4
  5. Mark Roberts

    Alan Browne Guest

    Alan Browne, Nov 5, 2003
    #5
  6. Mark Roberts

    Alan Browne Guest

    If Kodak become uncompetitve due to this, then Fuji film prices will
    rise. There is nothing like your favourite supplier having a good
    healthy competitor.
     
    Alan Browne, Nov 5, 2003
    #6
  7. Mark Roberts

    Deathwalker Guest

    Yeah their share value will go up just due to people hearing about his
    interest in the firm. Several hundred employees are as good as fucked
    though.
     
    Deathwalker, Nov 5, 2003
    #7
  8. He is reported to want to dump all the none film parts
    If true, that strategy would only accelerate Kodak's death-spiral.

    Anyone care to predict the size of the 2013 film market versus
    2003's ? I'm guessing a drop of 50 to 75%.

    stan
     
    Stanley Krute, Nov 5, 2003
    #8
  9. Mark Roberts

    Nick Zentena Guest


    If the stories of what Ichan wants to do are true then it might be good
    news for film users. He is reported to want to dump all the none film parts
    of Kodak and turn Kodak into nothing but a pure film company.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, Nov 5, 2003
    #9
  10. Mark Roberts

    Gordon Moat Guest

    Sure, I will take that bet. Due to the under exploitation of emerging
    markets, and the predicted future prevalence of wireless imaging, I
    predict stable to 10% growth in global photographic film sales volume. I
    will also predict that Polaroid will be acquired by Fuji prior to 2013.

    Pop me an e-mail in ten years, and we will discuss who was correct. A
    bonus pack of Polaroid 665 P/N to whomever was closest in predictions.
    ;-)

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    Alliance Graphique Studio
    <http://www.allgstudio.com>
     
    Gordon Moat, Nov 5, 2003
    #10
  11. Hi Gordon

    and you responded:
    Hmmm. I was thinking of the U.S. market. As regards global
    markets: you may be right.
    Heheheheh. I like that one.
    Cool. See ya in ten ....

    Stan
    [still shooting film, until someone brings
    me 10+ MP for Nikon lenses at < $3k]
     
    Stanley Krute, Nov 5, 2003
    #11
  12. Mark Roberts

    George Guest

    Regarding your requirements above, I thought that was going to be Kodak
    since the DCS-14n isn't that far from your wishlist...I've seen them factory
    refurb'd for right around $3.7k. BTW, I'm assuming your wishlist is a for a
    digital camera for Nikon lenses with a 1X multiplication factor.
     
    George, Nov 5, 2003
    #12
  13. Hi George
    Sigh. If only Kodak had chosen to use a sensor with noise levels akin
    to Canon's .... I love the cleanth of the 10d images in that regard. I'm thinking
    that by the time my price point is well-hit, 1600 ISO that's cleaner than 100 ISO
    film will be in existence.
    That'd be best, although I'm will to pop for a new
    wide-angle lens that can deal with a > 1X factor.
    But I think the noise issues involved in getting
    sensors.

    stan
     
    Stanley Krute, Nov 6, 2003
    #13
  14. Mark Roberts

    Deathwalker Guest

    BOLLOCKS!
     
    Deathwalker, Nov 6, 2003
    #14
  15. Hi Deathwalker

    Actually, Gordon Moat penned that thought.

    Stan
     
    Stanley Krute, Nov 6, 2003
    #15
  16. Mark Roberts

    Nils Rostedt Guest

    That's a bold guess about the emerging markets. After all, they are the same
    markets that never had many fixed phone lines, but today they are the
    fastest growing markets for digital cellular phones. So by inference, they
    may well become the first markets where camera-phones are going to outnumber
    traditional cameras, film or digital. Why would they prefer film? They may
    be poor, but not stupid.

    /N
     
    Nils Rostedt, Nov 6, 2003
    #16
  17. Mark Roberts

    Gordon Moat Guest

    Thanks Stan. Also, I will stand by that prediction. As your reply to my post
    originally stated, you were only considering the North American market. A great
    deal of the world does not have computers, but would be easy to have one hour
    photo places. A read through financial papers, and analysts projections,
    indicates that there are many emerging markets in the world that would be good
    choices for expansion of more Western products.

    The bigger issue is profits. As long as there are profits to be made from
    photographic film, some companies will make it. While those profits may
    diminish in the US, Europe, and Japan, that is only a small portion of a larger
    potential world market. Technology does not drive markets, profits do.

    Still don't believe this, then take the bet. Pop me an e-mail in ten years, at
    let us see what happened.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    Alliance Graphique Studio
    <http://www.allgstudio.com>
     
    Gordon Moat, Nov 6, 2003
    #17
  18. Mark Roberts

    Gordon Moat Guest

    Cheap printing and cheap one-time-use cameras. The old idea of "you take the
    photos, and we do the rest". The other thing I failed to mention is that
    traditional publication printing involves film technology. While this
    technology is more directly related to photographic B/W film production, it
    easily lends itself to continued photographic film production.

    I do think camera phones (wireless imaging) will replace low end P&S digital
    cameras, and sooner than later. However, I do not ever think they will ever be
    as cheap as disposable cameras, which are high volume, and high profit
    products. There are already several projects in Africa (for example) in which
    children are given low cost disposable cameras. The ease of use, ruggedness,
    lack of need for batteries, and light weight are advantages.

    The other issue with third world phone usage is cost. An excellent example is
    illustrated by the the young phones users of Greece, where many of them cannot
    afford to make many calls, but the origination of plans by service providers
    offered free text messaging. The result was that many phones in use by Greek
    teenagers only got used for text messaging. Similar usage and issues have
    appeared in several other markets.

    Add in the battery and charging issues, and it is easy to see that usage limits
    in some markets are self regulating. Phone support will relate to provider
    profits, not phone sales. While the initial phone sales can generate some
    profits, those must be sustained by monthly usage. Higher monthly usage will
    drive consumer costs lower, and expand available services.

    The downside of disposable cameras is the need for processing places. Only the
    major cities will have these, and initial equipment purchases will also depend
    upon sales volumes.

    Anyway, further discussion is too vast, and more than I care to discuss on this
    NG. I have done my homework on this stuff, and I have several sources for this
    information prediction, since these are more the opinions of others more
    knowledgeable than I.

    You are welcome to join the bet, and e-mail me in ten years.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    Alliance Graphique Studio
    <http://www.allgstudio.com>
     
    Gordon Moat, Nov 6, 2003
    #18
  19. Mark Roberts

    Nils Rostedt Guest

    ">
    Well, I don't think I did. But it would be nice to see some responses to the
    question.

    "You ain't seen nothing yet". But let's see in ten years ;-)

    Cheers,
    /N
     
    Nils Rostedt, Nov 6, 2003
    #19
  20. Mark Roberts

    Nick Zentena Guest


    You just answered your own question.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, Nov 6, 2003
    #20
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