Introduction to Lith Printing

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by abi_news, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. abi_news

    abi_news Guest

    Can anyone recommend a starting point if I was interested in lith
    printing? I have developed and printed b&W before, but would like to
    know more about lith printing.

    Are the chemicals more expensive, it is possible to purchase "kits", I
    am based in the UK.

    Thanks, Abi
     
    abi_news, Jan 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. abi_news

    G- Blank Guest

    http://www.lithprint.com/



    --
    "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President,
    or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong,
    is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable
    to the American public."--Theodore Roosevelt, May 7, 1918

    greg_____photo(dot)com
     
    G- Blank, Jan 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. abi_news

    Ken Hart Guest

    Many, many ( many!) years ago, I did some playing with Kodalith material. I
    used the Kodalith A-B developer to get black-and-white (no gray tones)
    images. I also used Kodak Dektol (paper developer) to get very high contrast
    images.

    The Kodak material could be handled similarly to b&w enlarging paper. I made
    enlargements on it with enlarger exposures nearly the same as with paper.

    An interesting thing you can try is to make a 'lith print in a convenient
    size, preferably of a contrasty subject. Take that lith print, and contact
    print it onto another sheet of lith film. You now have a positive, and a
    negative. Sandwich the two together, ever so slightly out of register. Print
    that on photo paper, probably as a contact print, because it will be very
    dense. (Or make yet a third 'lith from which to print.) You will get an
    overall gray image with areas of different densities outlined.
     
    Ken Hart, Jan 31, 2006
    #3
  4. abi_news

    Mike Guest

    Get the Fotospeed Lith starter kit. Includes chemicals, 10 sheets of
    paper suitable for lith as well as some basic instructions. See
    www.fotospeed.com/lith.htm. Also available from most online suppliers
    such as www.firstcall-photographic.co.uk, www.novadarkroom.com, etc.
    Tim Rudman's book is still available but it's a bit out of date now.
    Most of the papers he mentions are no longer available or have changed
    their formulation. Still, it's a very interesting read.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 31, 2006
    #4
  5. A good place to start is with Tim Rudman's book on Alternative
    printing and Lith printing. You can learn some more about them at
    http://www.alternativephotography.com/articles/art031.html


    Also, do a web search for Tim Rudman.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Jan 31, 2006
    #5
  6. abi_news

    Mike Guest

    I forgot to mention that Fotospeed do a special offer if you buy Tim
    Rudman's Lith printing book with their Lith starter kit. See
    www.fotospeed.com for details.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 31, 2006
    #6
  7. abi_news

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    Search this NG for, wall's normal hydroquinone .
    Search this NG for, semiquinone . From Google search
    for, "lith formulas" .
    As you will see Homebrew Lith Developer is as easy as
    one, two, three. One, hydroquinone, two sodium sulfite, and
    three, sodium carbonate.
    As mentioned by one of the posters, Ascorbic Acid will
    work in place of the sulfite. I've not tried that. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Jan 31, 2006
    #7
  8. abi_news

    tony wingo Guest

    tony wingo, Feb 1, 2006
    #8
  9. abi_news

    herb10660 Guest

    In my recent and limited experience:
    Fotospeed LD20 developer is the smallest and most economical pack t
    get. It has instructions for lith printing supplied.
    Most reliable paper for me is Forte Polywarmtone Fibre Based. Get i
    from silverprint.co.uk. Excellent results every time so far.
    Kentmere Kentona and Art Classic are also good but a bit more difficul
    to control.
    Ilford MG warmtone is a lovely paper but don't bother to lith it.
    Tim Rudman's book is indispensable, even though the technical info i
    out of date. He has updated it at
    http://www.alternativephotography.com/articles/art031.html
    There is also his excellent overview
    http://www.alternativephotography.com/process_lithprint.html
    A safelight torch is needed to check progress, or in my case, a Jessop
    red safelight that's not been fixed down.
    A CD player in the darkroom makes those 20 minute developing times pas
    by a bit quicker..
     
    herb10660, Feb 3, 2006
    #9
  10. abi_news

    Lew Guest

    Lew, Feb 9, 2006
    #10
  11. abi_news

    Lew Guest

    Lew, Feb 9, 2006
    #11
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