IPad questions

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Rah Q5, May 24, 2013.

  1. Rah Q5

    Rah Q5 Guest

    I put up my hummingbird feeders and am waiting for them to stop by.
    Probably too cold here in the Great Lakes region just yet, but I'm
    waiting.

    Anyway, the feeders are just outside the window and after a few photos,
    I'd like to try taking a short video with the IPad of the hummers.

    Question is how long should the video be? Can it be zoomed? One can in
    photos.

    And is there any good Apps to edit the video in case I want to send it
    to someone?

    I love using the IPad to show others my photos or emailing them. For
    wildlife, I have DSLRs but this is just for simple photographs and
    videos when home.
    Thanks for any input!
     
    Rah Q5, May 24, 2013
    #1
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  2. Rah Q5

    philo  Guest



    I live in Milwaukee and saw a hummingbird last week,
    so you should keep your eyes open
     
    philo , May 28, 2013
    #2
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  3. Rah Q5

    Rah Q5 Guest

    Thanks, Philo, I certainly will! Can't wait to see some! :))

    Weather is supposed to get up to the high 70's to the 80's next couple
    of days, so hopefully that will help some! :))
     
    Rah Q5, May 29, 2013
    #3
  4. Rah Q5

    philo  Guest



    BTW:
    My daughter lives in Arizona and is quite good at photographing them...
    She uses a lens that zooms up to 300mm.

    She let me borrow it, but the birds are so fast I had difficulty getting
    anything.
     
    philo , May 29, 2013
    #4
  5. Rah Q5

    PeterN Guest

    The trick my friends use is to prefocus on a flower, or feeder you think
    (hope) they will approach. then sit in a comfortable chair, with a cool
    one, and wait. I have consistently picked the wrong spot, but some of my
    friends haven't.
     
    PeterN, May 29, 2013
    #5
  6. Rah Q5

    philo  Guest

    I'd sit there for an hour, get bored and move the camera, then the bird
    would show up.

    I prefer human subjects, no matter how fast, slow in comparison to a
    hummingbird.
     
    philo , May 30, 2013
    #6
  7. Rah Q5

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Put the camera on a tripod and use a remote.
     
    Tony Cooper, May 30, 2013
    #7
  8. Rah Q5

    Rah Q5 Guest

    Rah Q5, May 31, 2013
    #8
  9. Rah Q5

    PeterN Guest

    Yup! the issue I see is that you have taken some pictures of a bird
    feeder. The hummer is way out of focus. the trick is anticipation and luck.
     
    PeterN, May 31, 2013
    #9
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