Is film dead?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Colyn, Jan 17, 2004.

  1. Colyn

    Colyn Guest

    Colyn, Jan 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Richard Cockburn, Jan 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. Colyn

    Colyn Guest

    Colyn, Jan 17, 2004
    #3
  4. Colyn

    Nick Zentena Guest

    We're discussing the death of digital cameras over in the medium format
    group.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, Jan 17, 2004
    #4
  5. Colyn

    Skip M Guest

    Distinction, film isn't dead, high end film cameras are fading fast. Look
    at the sales of disposables, and people who haven't sold their film bodies
    still buy film.
     
    Skip M, Jan 17, 2004
    #5
  6. Colyn

    Colyn Guest

    Colyn, Jan 17, 2004
    #6
  7. For the amateurs and newspapers with frequent deadlines, maybe. But for
    professionals there will have to be a big improvement in digital quality before
    the magazine, stock, and poster markets quit demanding transparencies.
     
    George Johnston, Jan 17, 2004
    #7
  8. Colyn

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    I can tell you haven't sold anything to the magazine, stock or poster market
    of late.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Jan 17, 2004
    #8
  9. Colyn

    MXP Guest

    It is my experience that a scanned film has a hard time to compete with
    the top digital cameraes. But a 100% analog print made from film competes
    very well with a digital print.

    Max
     
    MXP, Jan 17, 2004
    #9
  10. Colyn

    Patrick L. Guest


    My brother is a stock photographer who still shoots with film, but he
    provides scans of all his transparencies.


    Patrick
     
    Patrick L., Jan 17, 2004
    #10
  11. Colyn

    Jim Waggener Guest

    aren't all "presses" for these markets, digital as well?
     
    Jim Waggener, Jan 17, 2004
    #11
  12. Colyn

    The Wogster Guest

    Each format has advantages and disadvantages, in the case of film it takes
    time to process, where digital doesn't. For newspapers and other areas
    where there is extreme tight deadlines, this can be a good thing. Film has
    the advantage in that the negative is it's own archive system, 40 years
    from now, when nobody has a CD-R player anymore, and the latest 256bit
    colour files with 99% lossless compression mean that no software exists
    anymore that can read a 24bit un-compressed TIFF, the then 40 year old
    negatives can simply be re-scanned.

    With all of the existing film cameras around, and the fact a film camera
    has a 100 year lifespan (providing it gets a good CLA every 20 or so
    years) and isn't used by a pro who wears them out quickly. The market for
    film will be here for many years to come. As long as there is a market,
    there will be film.

    W
     
    The Wogster, Jan 17, 2004
    #12
  13. Just look at the number of cameras being bought on eBay.

    There are two sides to every story.
     
    Joseph Meehan, Jan 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Colyn

    Skip M Guest

    My wife's cousin shoots for all of those markets, and he is 100% digital.
    The only thing he ever uses film for is formal wedding portraits, using
    medium format. Everything else, he shoots digital, even the weddings
    themselves.
     
    Skip M, Jan 18, 2004
    #14
  15. Colyn

    Steve Kramer Guest

    Please... if you don't know the facts, don't try telling them to us. If
    you want to express an opinion label it as such.

    You aren't a working photographer, are you.
    I haven't shot film in more than a year, but sell to magazines every
    month, have several new posters (one panorama of a resort that is 3'X10'
    hanging in an airport) and shoot advertising copy on a regular basis.
    All with digital.

    Steve Kramer
    Chiang Mai, Thailand
    http://www.photoenvisions.com
     
    Steve Kramer, Jan 18, 2004
    #15
  16. Colyn

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    It is interesting that whoever started this thread (someone in my
    killfile I assume) thinks the number of cameras being sold on ebay is
    indicative of the death of digital. Three years ago this was the argument
    the darkroom people made attempting to prove that chemical darkrooms are
    going to be here forever. Matt Clara recently posted about getting a 23C
    with a lot of goodies including a lens on ebay for less than the price I
    used to pay just for a lens. And he also said the 23c is no longer being
    made. I would assume a lot of stuff showing up on ebay is probably a poor
    indication for positive trends in a market. Look instead for a lot of ads
    saying "WAIT, WAIT! Don't buy that one - we have a better one coming out
    next month".
     
    Tony Spadaro, Jan 18, 2004
    #16
  17. Colyn

    Jim Waggener Guest

    Is it a Nikon? ;-)
     
    Jim Waggener, Jan 18, 2004
    #17
  18. Colyn

    Colyn Guest

    I never said the number of cameras being sold on ebay is indicative of
    the death of digital.

    In fact both film and digital are both very much alive. but then you
    only read what you want..

    Colyn Goodson

    http://home.swbell.net/colyng
    http://www.colyngoodson.com
    http://www.colyngoodson.com/manuals.html
     
    Colyn, Jan 18, 2004
    #18
  19. Colyn

    Colyn Guest

    Colyn, Jan 18, 2004
    #19
  20. Colyn

    Jim Waggener Guest

    Lol. the medium and large format folks think the "film is dead" comment
    laughable.
    Particularly with the new slide films that have been released in the last
    couple of years.

    Jim
     
    Jim Waggener, Jan 18, 2004
    #20
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