Is Olympus E1 video out a live image?

Discussion in 'Olympus' started by ian mayo, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. ian mayo

    ian mayo Guest

    Hi all,

    The Olympus E1 digital camera has a Video Out jack for connection to a
    television set. Can anybody please tell me if the camera can be configured
    to show the "live" image through the lens through this socket?

    It may be that with the SLR viewfinder open the CCD can't see through the
    lens anway, but it would be really useful to find a definitive answer.

    Cheers,
    Ian
     
    ian mayo, Mar 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. ian mayo

    John Navas Guest

    [POSTED TO rec.photo.digital - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <> on Fri, 05 Mar 2004 16:58:17
    That's only true when the SLR uses a mirror. In an SLR with a beam splitter,
    it is possible to have live video output. While the Olympus E-10/20 is fixed
    lens, and thus not an SLR in the usual sense of the term, it does demonstrate
    how this is possible.
     
    John Navas, Mar 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. ian mayo

    John Navas Guest

    [POSTED TO rec.photo.digital - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <> on Fri, 05 Mar 2004 20:44:26 -0600,
    SLR means only Single Lens Reflex, where viewing is through the lens itself.
    It matters not whether a mirror or beamsplitter is used. It doesn't even
    really matter if the lens is fixed or interchangeable, although we tend to
    think of SLRs as having interchangeable lenses.
     
    John Navas, Mar 6, 2004
    #3
  4. No!

    Make a search for Canon Pellix and you will find a SLR with a fixed
    mirror. You had no blackout during exposure due to the
    semi-transparent mirror.

    /Daniel L.
     
    Daniel Lindström, Mar 6, 2004
    #4
  5. ian mayo

    John Navas Guest

    [POSTED TO rec.photo.digital - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <> on Sat, 06 Mar 2004 04:13:52 -0600,
    Random House Unabridged Dictionary:

    reflex camera
    a camera in which the image appears on a ground-glass viewer
    (focusing screen) after being reflected by a mirror or after passing
    through a prism or semitransparent glass; in one type (single-lens
    reflex camera), light passes through the same lens to both the ground
    glass and the film, while in another type (twin-lens reflex camera),
    light passes through one lens (viewing lens) to the ground glass and
    through a second lens (taking lens) to the film, the lenses being
    mechanically coupled for focusing.
     
    John Navas, Mar 6, 2004
    #5
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