Is the EOS 1V much bigger than a F100 ?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by DAVID SMITH, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. DAVID SMITH

    DAVID SMITH Guest

    Hi im thinking of getting one or the other.

    Im erring toward the 1V due to the ruggedness and 100% veiwfinder.

    But then I heard the f100 is nearly as rugged and much lighter!

    Anyone know the respective weights of each and any serious flaws to each?
     
    DAVID SMITH, Mar 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. DAVID SMITH

    JIM Guest

    Doubtful anyone using both........why not do your own investigation and
    access their respective web sites, www.canonusa.com, www.nikonusa.com and
    compare? Will give you one thought to consider: F100 has built-in flash - 1V
    does not, so doing any flash stuff with the 1V requires buying another
    thingy; but then, comparison of the 1V should be with the Nikon F5, not the
    100;)

    Shoot'em up, with anything, Agfa, Fuji, Kodak and all the rest will love you
    for it!!

    Jim
     
    JIM, Mar 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. DAVID SMITH

    Matt Clara Guest

    Nope, not the F100--the N80 has built in flash.
     
    Matt Clara, Mar 1, 2004
    #3
  4. DAVID SMITH

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    The EOS 3 is at least as rugged as the F100 and better weather sealed - for
    less money.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Mar 1, 2004
    #4
  5. DAVID SMITH

    Bob Guest

    You can get the specs at the manufacturers' web sites.
    http://www.usa,canon.com for Canon

    Or you can check B&H's web site and compare.

    As far as problems and flaws, go to
    http://www.a1.nl/phomepag/markerink/eos_list.htm for Canon info.

    You probably gathered by now that I shoot Canon so I know next to
    nothing about Nikon.

    Once you decide on which fits you best you can't go wrong with either.

    Bob
     
    Bob, Mar 2, 2004
    #5
  6. DAVID SMITH

    JIM Guest

    Sorry about that, the Nikon site is confusing in that regard. Specs for the
    F100 refer to things like TTL flash, etc., without mentioning the
    requirement to purchase a flash for those features to work;)

    Shoot'em up, with anything, Agfa, Fuji, Kodak and all the rest will love you
    for it!!

    Jim
     
    JIM, Mar 2, 2004
    #6
  7. DAVID SMITH

    TP Guest


    You're comparing apples and oranges.

    The nearest equivalent Canon to the Nikon F100 is the EOS 3. I have
    used both and they are excellent cameras. I have a slight preference
    for the handling of the Nikon but I was very pleased with my EOS 3.

    The nearest equivalent Nikon to the Canon EOS 1V is the F5.

    I suggest that you should try these cameras before making a decision.
    I further suggest that the choice of lenses available in each
    manufacturer's range should play a very large part in deciding which
    brand to go with.

    If you believe that the choice of camera is more important than the
    choice of lenses, you are probably making a big mistake.
     
    TP, Mar 2, 2004
    #7
  8. DAVID SMITH

    Matt Clara Guest

    As others have said, you're comparing apples and oranges; however, the f100
    is smaller and lighter than the 1v, unless you strap on the "motor drive"
    (they don't actually conain motors anymore, do they?). Then it's (more or
    less) the same size and undoubtedly less rugged. The F100 is a great camera
    all the same.
     
    Matt Clara, Mar 2, 2004
    #8
  9. DAVID SMITH

    Gregg Guest

    Both great cameras tied to fantastic systems, but as the Canon flagship film
    body, the EOS 1V really should be compared to the Nikon F5, both are larger
    and much heavier than the F100 w/o the MB-15 battery/grip. With the MB-15,
    the F100 is close in size, but still a little bit lighter.
     
    Gregg, Mar 2, 2004
    #9
  10. DAVID SMITH

    Annika1980 Guest

    From: "DAVID SMITH"
    The fabulous EOS-1V has no known flaws (except that it uses film).
    You want lightweight, get an ELPH.
     
    Annika1980, Mar 3, 2004
    #10
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