is there "finishing" for miniDV?

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by bjanko, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. bjanko

    bjanko Guest

    miniDV or DVCam... are these usually cut at low res for a future hi res
    color correction? or is miniDV just so imprecise that "finishing" just
    doesn't apply. (if so, then should I digitize miniDV at 15:1s?)

    also, how much difference is there between miniDV and DVCam, and how
    can I tell which is which from looking at the tapes?

    Thanks in advance,
    Brian
     
    bjanko, Apr 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. "bjanko" wrote ...
    Making several assumptions about your unconventional
    terminology...

    DV ("mini" or otherwise), DVCAM, and DVCpro25 are all
    compressed 5:1 and are, for most purposes, identical. They
    are collectively refered to as DV25 (25MB/second)
    Define: "imprecise"? Define: "finishing"?
    across, bit-for-bit. No "digitization" involved. The DV-AVI
    (or DV-MOV) file is the same 5:1 compression that is on the
    tape.

    Unless you are compressing directly to MPEG, or some such.
    Not enough information to make any guesses that would be
    useful (or understandable) to you.
    They are 98% identical. The only significant differences are
    "unlocked" audio (in DV) and the physical tape speed of
    DVCAM is 150% that of DV. (60-minuite DV tape runs
    40 minutes in a DVCAM machine).
    Under ideal circumstances, you can't.
     
    Richard Crowley, Apr 6, 2005
    #2
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  3. Try none except tape size and audio locking which cameras like the DVX100
    have anyway. All compressed the same.
    Mike
     
    R. Michael Walker, Apr 6, 2005
    #3
  4. bjanko

    Bob A Guest

    Try none except tape size and audio locking which cameras like the
    DVX100 have anyway. All compressed the same.
    Mike <<

    Huh?? there is no difference in tape size and "audio locking," assuming
    you are refering to Locked vs. un-locked audio, is not dectectable
    excep by a front panel indication on some decks..
     
    Bob A, Apr 6, 2005
    #4
  5. bjanko

    nap Guest

    I have cut DV features which were later transferred to Digibeta and color
    corrected. It is a common practice if the show is going on air .. of course
    many DV productions skip this step.
     
    nap, Apr 6, 2005
    #5
  6. bjanko

    bjanko Guest

    Richard,

    Thanks for your helpful replies.

    By "imprecise," I was referring to the tech telling me that the dub's
    timecode would not match the original with frame-for-frame accuracy.
    But based on the responses I've gotten on this, I suppose I can just
    forget about anything this tech says.

    By "finishing," I was referring mostly to the stage of post when color
    correction is done.

    Anyway, I appreciate your replies.

    Brian
     
    bjanko, Apr 6, 2005
    #6
  7. bjanko

    bjanko Guest

    I'm not sure what you all mean by "audio locking." Is this when the
    sound is recorded on the same tape as the video, as with miniDVs? Any
    references on this topic, so I could read about it would be helpful.

    Thanks,
    Brian
     
    bjanko, Apr 6, 2005
    #7
  8. bjanko

    bjanko Guest

    I think the producer has hopes and contacts for consideration by PBS.
    I need to inquire if this is even possible, (I mean whether the miniDV
    source can somehow be properly "outputted" so as to meet their
    broadcast specs.) Other avenues of marketing are also being
    considered.

    Based on your response makes me think there might be more potential for
    miniDV to be distributed than I had in mind. Thanks for the info.

    Brian
     
    bjanko, Apr 6, 2005
    #8
  9. bjanko

    nap Guest

    Sure it is done every day.

    Best bet is a talented colorist with a DaVinci.

    But as far as Dv going to air.. it is all over the place.
     
    nap, Apr 7, 2005
    #9
  10. bjanko

    bjanko Guest


    Once again, thanks for your answers.

    - Brian
     
    bjanko, Apr 7, 2005
    #10
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