JandC Pro 100 - 120 B&W - $1.19 Per Roll

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Dan Quinn, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. Dan Quinn

    Dan Quinn Guest

    Like to do photography on the cheap? I think J&C's $1.19 120
    film is the lowest price that can be found. That's a one roll
    at a time price. Can anybody do better? or is it worse?

    BTW, has anybody given it a try? Dan
     
    Dan Quinn, Aug 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. Dan Quinn

    john Guest

    Dan, I have not used that emulsion, but a short purchase and a test roll in
    your back yard will show you what's going on. I did a few sheets of J&C Efke
    25 that way this afternoon and it is definitely promising. (Now if I could
    only go somewhere
    ! :))
     
    john, Aug 30, 2004
    #2
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  3. Not the 120, but I've used their (J&C's) "Classic" film in 4x5 and found it to
    be plenty good. Don't know if it's exactly same stuff, though.
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 30, 2004
    #3
  4. I seldom shoot ISO 100, but I certainly plan to buy 10 or 20 rolls of
    their Classic 400 (at about $1.59/roll, IIRC, and a discount for more
    than 10, it seems to be the least costly 400 speed 120 film going) as
    soon as I'm ready to buy more film. I'm just about out of the expired
    TMY I bought last fall, and looking for a 400 speed film in 120 that'll
    cost me a lot less than new Tri-X or TMY.

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Aug 30, 2004
    #4
  5. Pro 100 is a different film from Classic 200 and Classic 400. I suspect
    it's Lucky, rebranded for J&C, and if so, it's said to combine some of
    the tonal and grain characteristics of TMX with the forgiving latitude
    of Plus-X -- and those are good comparisons, since the Lucky factory (in
    China) has licensed Kodak emulsion technology.

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Aug 30, 2004
    #5
  6. Dan Quinn

    bk Guest

    I shot the film at asa 100 in my Yashicamat, processed it in Pyrocat
    HD for 7 minutes at 80 degrees F and the results in well lit daylight
    scenes is very rich in the high lights. I'm going to try shooting
    with the film in overcast light.
     
    bk, Sep 1, 2004
    #6
  7. Dan Quinn

    John Guest

    I doubt this is as good as the best that Ilford or Kodak have
    to offer. Why not spend the extra $1.00 and get Ilford ? Believe me,
    there can be long term issues with cheap films.

    Regards,

    John S. Douglas, Photographer - http://www.darkroompro.com
    Please remove the "_" when replying via email
     
    John, Sep 1, 2004
    #7
  8. Dan Quinn

    Zuul Guest

    ----- Original Message -----
    Being new to medium format photography, I tried virtually all of the major
    ISO 100/125 films out there earlier this year. I settled in on JandC's
    Classic Pan 200 as my main work-a-day film, and have shot a couple dozen
    rolls of it this summer. With the right exposure and development, it
    produces really excellent results. I'm tempted to try JandC's new offering,
    but with Classic Pan 200 just a few cents more a roll, I will probably stick
    with the tried and true.

    FWIW - my experience has been that CP200 exposes best at ISO 100. I develop
    it in HC110, Dil H, 16 minutes @ 20C - minimal agitation in the first 9
    minutes. Shadow detail, sharpness, and grain are all excellent. I've also
    gotten good results using D76 and Rodinal with this film, but never really
    fine tuned the development with these.

    - MCC

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Mark Cassino Photography
    Kalamazoo, MI
    www.markcassino.com
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
     
    Zuul, Sep 2, 2004
    #8
  9. Dan Quinn

    Travis Porco Guest

    Has anyone tried it with Xtol? (35 mm daylight tanks).
    thanks, -travis
     
    Travis Porco, Sep 2, 2004
    #9
  10. Dan Quinn

    Frank Pittel Guest

    : ----- Original Message -----

    : > Like to do photography on the cheap? I think J&C's $1.19 120
    : > film is the lowest price that can be found. That's a one roll
    : > at a time price. Can anybody do better? or is it worse?
    : >
    : > BTW, has anybody given it a try? Dan

    : Being new to medium format photography, I tried virtually all of the major
    : ISO 100/125 films out there earlier this year. I settled in on JandC's
    : Classic Pan 200 as my main work-a-day film, and have shot a couple dozen
    : rolls of it this summer. With the right exposure and development, it
    : produces really excellent results. I'm tempted to try JandC's new offering,
    : but with Classic Pan 200 just a few cents more a roll, I will probably stick
    : with the tried and true.

    : FWIW - my experience has been that CP200 exposes best at ISO 100. I develop
    : it in HC110, Dil H, 16 minutes @ 20C - minimal agitation in the first 9
    : minutes. Shadow detail, sharpness, and grain are all excellent. I've also
    : gotten good results using D76 and Rodinal with this film, but never really
    : fine tuned the development with these.

    My understanding is that the J&C films are "old" style silver rich films. I keep
    meaning to try them myself but I know people that have they get good results.
    Not one of them has any regrets about using their film.
    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Sep 2, 2004
    #10
  11. As I understand it, the J&C Pro 100 film (the one that's this cheap) is
    rebranded Lucky. The Lucky film factory uses licensed Kodak technology,
    and the film they produce is said, by those who've tried it, to be every
    bit as good as current silver-based B&W offerings from Kodak, Ilford,
    and Fuji.

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Sep 2, 2004
    #11
  12. Dan Quinn

    Nicholas T. Guest

    You are right that the J&C Pro *looks* like it is rebranded Lucky film.
    It comes in the same red packet--that much is for sure.
    However, Lucky SHD100 and the J&C pro films are NOT the same. I repeat
    they are NOT the same ;-)
    A friend and I have compared notes and this is what I know for sure.
    The SHD100 is a good looking film, with a clear base (not like that
    Forte s*it). It is fine grained and takes a long time to fix. All
    indications are that it is a high iodide film (modern characteristics)
    and *possibly* with T-grain technology. It does not stain very well. Nor
    does the SHD400 stain well.
    However, J&Cpro does stain well according to my friend. It also has a
    clear base, good grain and is cheap-as-chips (as we say here in NZ). It
    does not take a long time to fix.
    So, my theory is that J&C bought the rest of the old stock of Lucky film
    from when they did not have the Kodak technology. That is, they bought
    the old Lucky film.
     
    Nicholas T., Sep 5, 2004
    #12
  13. Dan Quinn

    Dan Quinn Guest

    I did'nt see any SHD films listed at JandC.
    "... old stock ..." It is not clear to me just which film MIGHT be
    " old stock". Dan
     
    Dan Quinn, Sep 6, 2004
    #13
  14. Dan Quinn

    Dan Quinn Guest

    I suppose those big three films are Acros, Tmax and Delta 100. I
    wonder if anybody has realy given it some 'time tested' testing. Dan
     
    Dan Quinn, Sep 29, 2004
    #14
  15. I don't know of anyone doing so, and I haven't used any of it myself
    (yet); it's only been available from J&C for a few weeks, and Lucky
    hasn't been on the shelves in this country for long even under its own
    name. I have heard that the Lucky 100 is like a hybrid of TMX and
    Plus-X; it is said to have some characteristics like T-grain, but be a
    conventional cubic grain emulsion.

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Sep 30, 2004
    #15
  16. Dan Quinn

    jjs Guest

    I can't picture how that's even possible. T-grain is one thing and
    conventional is entirely different. The flatness of Tgrain is what
    distinguishes the two.
     
    jjs, Sep 30, 2004
    #16
  17. Some of the other technology that Kodak has applied only to T-grain
    films, however, doesn't depend on the grain form -- the sensitizing or
    restraining dyes that alter the color response and make T-Max films
    separate clouds from sky without a filter (something Tri-X doesn't do
    well and Verichrome Pan did rather poorly), for instance. Applying
    those techniques to a modern cubical grain film will give it some of the
    characteristics of T-Max (color response, no shoulder, etc.), but
    trade off slightly higher silver content against less costly production
    (ripening processes that were well established and fairly well
    understood 80 years ago instead of 1980s technology for guiding grain
    formation). The silver price crisis that prompted T-grain films
    originally no longer exists as such, and the cost of silver in film is a
    tiny fraction of the final price in any case.

    Mind you, this is hearsay on my part; I've never even handled Lucky
    film. But next time I have money to buy film, I plan to order ten or
    more rolls of the Pro 100 from J&C, along with a similar quantity of
    their Classic 400 -- considering I can shoot a roll of Pro 100 *and* one
    of Classic 400 for less than the cost of a fresh roll of either TMY or
    400TX (at least in 120), I'd be an idiot not to order enough to get a
    discount.

    I should check if they can still special order 320TXP in 9x12 cm via
    Fotoimpex, and at what minimum quantity, while I'm at it; what I have on
    hand will probably last me a year, but who knows how much longer I'll be
    able to get it, if it's even still available. Just think -- develop
    that stuff in Diafine and you have EI 800-1000 in a 1920s vintage plate
    camera, which makes hand holding in the "press photog" style a lot more
    practical (direct sun exposure f/32 @ 1/200, nicely within the range of
    my Tessar and Compur). Just remember, unexposed holders in the left
    pocket, exposed in the right. :)

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Sep 30, 2004
    #17
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