JY-HD10U DIGITAL HI-VISION HD CAMCORDER -- has anyone used this?

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Bexley, Jul 7, 2003.

  1. Bexley

    Bexley Guest

    If this is as good as the brochure looks then I'm impressed. Has anyone used
    it? Are there any consumer-review links you can recomend? What about
    Post-Prod? Can Premiere handle it in HD?

    TIA

    --Bex.
     
    Bexley, Jul 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bexley

    Ron Charles Guest

    I just finished playing with the HD-10 and this is my initial conclusions
    based on non-scientific determinations. Excuse any mistakes, as this is off
    the cuff and my memory has been known to be somewhat fuzzy at times.

    For a more technical test, check what Neuman Reuther and others come out
    with.

    1) Build Quality.
    Much better than I was expecting. The unit I tested came complete with a
    CaVision Matte Box and was a steal for $6700 CDN (about $4100 USD).
    One weird aspect to the camera is that the transport is contained in the
    rotating hand grip that you use to hold the camera. I didn't like the idea
    of the transport housing being twisted and turned while in operation, but
    then again what do I know.

    2) Image Quality
    Darn good for a camera in this price if lighting conditions are correct.
    This camera proves that a 1 CCD unit can be just as good as 3 CCD in many
    cases!!!
    INHO not as good in low light as a PD150 or even a AGDVX100.
    The non-interchangable lens and optics are made by JVC and this is certainly
    not thier best field.

    3) Audio Quality.
    Big mistake using a cheap non-phantom powered dual XLR to mini-jack box on
    the handle. I hope Beechtek has a good laugh at this one!

    4) Nice Extras
    Ability to up and down convert between DV, HDV, DVHS and HDVi with the flip
    of a switch. Uses standard miniDV tapes. Interesting DVHS and special
    composite outputs. Higher resolution viewfinder than the HD1, Lightweight,
    well balanced, nice feel to the unit in general. Looks damn good with the
    Matte Box!

    5) Accessories. Nice- uses standard sized filters so that wide angle
    adapters will be easy to find. I would love to test drive one with a
    Magiqcam or smaller Steadicam.

    6) Problems
    No current release of FCP3/4 or Avid ExpressDV can handle the newly adopted
    HDV format. There is however a new $1000 plug in (second party) available
    for Premier 6.5 which seems to work OK. JVC does not offer a capture deck of
    this format, so head wear will be heavy, and heads are not covered by the 1
    year service contract.

    6) Conclusions.
    If you want to be the first one your block to shoot native HDV with real16:9
    and you try hard to avoid bad lighting and audio situations, it's a nice
    animal, but I'll personally will wait and see what other brands come out
    with other sub $7500 USD models, perhaps with better optics and audio
    capabilities.
     
    Ron Charles, Jul 8, 2003
    #2
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  3. Bexley

    Jerry Jones Guest

    If this is as good as the brochure looks then I'm impressed. Has anyone used
    Here's a review from February 1:

    http://videosystems.com/ar/video_dv_dead/

    The author wrote:

    "So is 25Mbps DV dead?"

    "Personally, the answer is yes."

    "Like others now used to watching primetime TV, movies, and sports in
    HD, I've found NTSC simply doesn't have the resolution necessary for
    viewing on a large screen."

    "I'm looking forward to shooting widescreen in a format that will look
    great on a big screen."

    "Clearly, JVC is betting that I'm not the only one who feels this
    way."

    VIDEOMAKER MAGAZINE's cover story for the July 2003 issue is about the
    consumer version of this camcorder.

    The consumer model is the GR-HD1.

    Here is an interesting review point:

    - The HD mode shoots 30p, 16:9 widescreen at 1280 x 720

    Why is this significant?

    The author of the VIDEOMAKER REVIEW writes:

    "When we connected the camera to a $2,999 42-inch Gateway plasma
    television, we could see a dramatic difference between standard DV
    footage shot on a Mini DV camcorder and the HD footage of the GR-HD1."

    "The 16:9 HD video was sharp and clear, but we noticed some glowing in
    bright areas."

    "EVEN ON THE PLASMA TELEVISION, HOWEVER, WE COULD NOT SEE THE FULL
    QUALITY OF THE RAW IMAGE SHOT BY THIS CAMERA, PRIMARILY BECAUSE THE TV
    ONLY DISPLAYED AN 852 X 480 IMAGE, BUT ALSO BECAUSE OF THE LIMITATIONS
    OF PLASMA TECHNOLOGY."

    Wow.

    Now here's another significant point of the article:

    "After editing your footage, you can output to DVD-ready MPEG-2."

    "TO RETAIN THE FULL BENEFIT OF THE HD FORMAT FOR PLAYBACK ON YOUR
    HDTV, HOWEVER, YOU'LL NEED TO OUTPUT YOUR VIDEO BACK TO THE CAMERA OR
    TO A JVC D-VHS VCR."

    Interesting, eh?

    Jerry Jones
    http://www.jonesgroup.net
     
    Jerry Jones, Jul 8, 2003
    #3
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