Kodak 'Photoflow' chemical composition

Discussion in 'Kodak' started by mdhjwh, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. mdhjwh

    mdhjwh Guest

    If anyone out there remembers this product or has an old bottle on the
    shelf in the darkroom, I'd really like to find out the chemical
    composition. From memory this 'wetting agent' contained a single
    chemical (somewhat toxic?) . As Kodak don't sell it these days and
    aren't at all helpful in answering detailed questions, any information
    would will be much appreciated.
     
    mdhjwh, Sep 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. mdhjwh

    Jeff R Guest


    From the
    KODAK PHOTO-FLO 600 Solution MSDS.

    http://www.integraf.com/Downloads/MSDS_PhotoFlo_600.pdf

    2. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
    Weight % - Component - (CAS Registry No.)
    Concentrate:
    30-40 Water (007732-18-5)
    37 Ethylene glycol (000107-21-1)
    25-30 p-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl alcohol (009002-93-1)
    Working solution:
    < 0.5 Ethylene glycol (000107-21-1)
    < 0.5 p-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl alcohol (009002-93-1)
    ------------------------------------------------------

    3. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
    Concentrate:
    CONTAINS: Ethylene glycol (000107-21-1); P-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl
    alcohol (009002-93-1)
    WARNING!
    HARMFUL OR FATAL IF SWALLOWED
    CAN CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE
    CAN CAUSE CNS EFFECTS
    CAUSES EYE IRRITATION
    HMIS Hazard Ratings:
    Health - * 2, Flammability - 1, Reactivity - 0, Personal Protection - B
    NFPA Hazard Ratings:
    Health - 1, Flammability - 1, Reactivity (Stability) - 0
    Working solution:
    LOW HAZARD FOR RECOMMENDED HANDLING
    HMIS Hazard Ratings:
    Health - 1, Flammability - 0, Reactivity - 0, Personal Protection - A
    NFPA Hazard Ratings:
    Health - 1, Flammability - 0, Reactivity (Stability) - 0

    *************

    Hehehe
    *Water* has a registry number for hazard identifiaction.
     
    Jeff R, Sep 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. mdhjwh

    Ayn Marx Guest

    I suppose it depends on where they get their water from?

    Thanks for the information. The fomula is slightly more complex than I
    remembered it.
    I'd thought it was a one ingredient product and was hoping to get hold
    of the same chemical from a wholesaler.
    Now for the horrible confession that reveals me as an off-topic troll.
    I'm not about to dive into the darkroom and produce a batch of high
    resolution B & W prints if I manage to get my hands on something
    similar to 'Photoflow'. I use it as part of a formula for cleaning
    vinyl LP's . Remember them?
    The best mixture I've come across includes 80% distilled water, 20%
    isopropyl alchohol,
    with 10 drops commercial window cleaner (Windex in Oz) & ten drops
    'Photoflow' per litre.
    This is applied on a VPI vacuum LP cleaning machine.
    So , now you know I'm a troll who doesn't belong on this group apart
    from having and ancient Nikomat F ,a few decent Nikon lenses and
    filters and a low resolution digital camera that's got a scratched lens
    and takes wonderful foggy shots of ------- er fog.
     
    Ayn Marx, Sep 28, 2005
    #3
  4. mdhjwh

    Jeff R Guest

    Its just a fancy way of saying antifreeze (Ethylene glycol) and alcohol.
    (in very small concentrations)


    Bummer. Still, they're cheap.

    As to the Photoflo - when desperate (3am in darkroom, results needed in the
    morning) I've been known to use a few drops of detergent (successfully) to
    de-wet 35mm negs. Not as reliable as Photoflo, but it worked.
     
    Jeff R, Sep 28, 2005
    #4
  5. Sounds just like a regular around here!
    BP make a product called "Comprox" it is a detergent to be sure but also
    an excellent wetting agent. Substitute the "10Drops of photoflow" with
    comprox and you probably will achieve the same softning of the mixture.

    Years ago Esso oil company made a powerded product called - wait for it:
    Wetting agent! Don't know if you can still get it but it was pretty good
    stuff too.
     
    Pix on Canvas, Sep 28, 2005
    #5
  6. mdhjwh

    Rob Guest


    Kodak did change the composition to comply with the toxicity at some
    stage. Did contain Formaldehyde.


    I have 3 bottles of Ilford Wetting Agent and Glazing Solution 500ml
    bottles. Never to be used again. ( May have more downstairs)

    Interested?
     
    Rob, Sep 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Sure does, dihydrogen monoxide* is dangerous stuff! ;)

    * - http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html
     
    Woon Wai Keen, Sep 28, 2005
    #7
  8. mdhjwh

    Ayn Marx Guest


    Name a price petal & I'll let you know if I am. thanks.......
     
    Ayn Marx, Sep 28, 2005
    #8
  9. mdhjwh

    Ayn Marx Guest

    Some are , some aren't . The one I have is really cheap and nasty (
    why, oh why don't they make lens covers for the damned things?).
    However, it does amazing things with close ups in bright light by
    bluring everything outside the central subject area. I've had
    photographers ask me where I got the special filter , was it gelatine?
    etc. Trouble is, that's all it does. Oh, nad lovely foggy shots of fog.
    If I didn't aleady have a very expensive hobby (Hi-Fi) I'd buy a nice
    new SLR digital top of the range thingy .
    Just have to put up with the Nikomat until they stop making film that
    is.........................
    What I'd really like though is a cartridge type 020thingy that could be
    slotted into the back of a standard SLR and turn it into a digital
    thingy. Does that make any sense.?
     
    Ayn Marx, Sep 28, 2005
    #9
  10. mdhjwh

    Rob Guest

    $10 plus the postage ($10)for the 3 bottles. The weight in at 575g each
    plus the carton from 2500.


    leave an email so I can reply

    rm
     
    Rob, Sep 28, 2005
    #10
  11. mdhjwh

    Ayn Marx Guest

    Hope my email got to you as I've found Google's emailing from
    newsgroups not reliable in the delivery.
    If it hasn't reached your end email me on
     
    Ayn Marx, Sep 28, 2005
    #11
  12. mdhjwh

    Ayn Marx Guest

    HOLD EVERTHING ! I just noticed the bit about Glazing Solution. I do
    NOT want to glaze my LP's when I clean them . I don't think your Ilford
    wetting agent is the answer. If it was simply a wetting agent it would
    be.
     
    Ayn Marx, Sep 28, 2005
    #12
  13. mdhjwh

    prep Guest

    That is colour stabilizer. The good one that works :)

    Photoflo is a surfactant, but I don't think K have ever
    revealed wich one.

    --
    Paul Repacholi 1 Crescent Rd.,
    +61 (08) 9257-1001 Kalamunda.
    West Australia 6076
    comp.os.vms,- The Older, Grumpier Slashdot
    Raw, Cooked or Well-done, it's all half baked.
    EPIC, The Architecture of the future, always has been, always will be.
     
    prep, Sep 28, 2005
    #13
  14. mdhjwh

    Bruce Graham Guest

    [This followup was posted to aus.photo and a copy was sent to the cited
    author.]

    you forgot to mention the other one in the formula you gave:
    P-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl alcohol (009002-93-1)

    which I think is the real wetting agent in the formula. I googled for a
    few moments (I'm not a chemist) and apparently it has many synonyms
    including Triton X which rings a bell from the old Photoflo label??.

    Last time I developed a roll of B&W I used a drop of dishwasher rinse aid
    very well diluted, which seemed to work OK but I have no idea if it will
    rot my negs in 50 years!

    Bruce G
     
    Bruce Graham, Sep 28, 2005
    #14
  15. mdhjwh

    Jeff R Guest


    Did you read the MSDS a few posts up?
     
    Jeff R, Sep 29, 2005
    #15
  16. mdhjwh

    prep Guest

    Have now... And saved it.

    --
    Paul Repacholi 1 Crescent Rd.,
    +61 (08) 9257-1001 Kalamunda.
    West Australia 6076
    comp.os.vms,- The Older, Grumpier Slashdot
    Raw, Cooked or Well-done, it's all half baked.
    EPIC, The Architecture of the future, always has been, always will be.
     
    prep, Oct 2, 2005
    #16
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