Kodak Poly-Toner

Discussion in 'Kodak' started by Bernie, Oct 21, 2005.

  1. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    There have been several posts the past few years about how to make a
    substitute for Kodak's discontinued Poly-Toner. Well, Kodak finally posted
    directions on their website;

    http://www.kodak.com/global/plugins/acrobat/en/service/chemicals/CIS268.pdf

    Looks pretty easy to me for many of the people here. I saw this while
    looking for other information and thought I'd share, since Kodak "hid" it in
    the technical info section for color processing chemicals.
     
    Bernie, Oct 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. Thanks for pointing this out.
    Powdered Selenium is quite hazardous and must be handled
    with great care. Since an acceptable toner can be made by
    combining Kodak Brown Toner and Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner
    it seems to me to be a better solution. However, its
    interesting to know what the actual formula for Polytoner is
    (or something quite close to it).
    The formula I tried and found works well is as follows.
    Instead of making a stock solution and diluting it 1:3 I
    make it up in working strength. The test solution I made up
    a couple of months ago is still working so it evidently
    keeps fairly well.

    Water 500.0 ml
    Sodium Carbonate, anhydrous 160.0 grams
    Kodak Brown Toner 320.0 ml
    Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner 80.0 ml
    Water to make 1.0 liter

    Dilute 1: 3 for use.
    Tone 3 to 5 minutes at 68F. And clear in Kodak Hypo Clearing
    Agent.
    Source: _Modern Photography_, December 1953, p.87

    I find that this formula tones very quickly at room
    temperature. 1 minute is enough for most papers. The purpose
    of the KHCA is to remove any stain. While a water wash
    immediately after toning seems to work treating in KHCA or
    Sodium Sulfite will remove any staining and prevent after
    toning in the wash.
    This formula probably does not exactly duplicate the
    tones produced by either Polytoner or the Kodak formula in
    the PDF above but it is different from either KBT or KRST.
    It is very easy to mix and does not involve any seriously
    hazardous chemicals.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Oct 22, 2005
    #2
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