Kodak Tech Pan , what rating ?

Discussion in 'Kodak' started by Joseph Kewfi, Jul 12, 2003.

  1. Joseph Kewfi

    Joseph Kewfi Guest

    For landscape photography with red filter what speed is Tech Pan best at
    considering it will be developed in HC-110 Developer ? I want very small
    grain and the least reduction in contrast, for large prints.
     
    Joseph Kewfi, Jul 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. I suggest ~25 speed processed as recommended by Kodak in TECHNIDOL.
     
    Joseph Meehan, Jul 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Darkroom prints or digital (scanned + inkjet) prints? In neither case
    will I make a recommendation, but if the negs are going to be scanned
    the answer may be different.

    HFL
     
    Harry F. Lockwood, Jul 13, 2003
    #3
  4. Joseph Kewfi

    Paul W. Ross Guest

    I'm using it in a pinhole camera and 4x5 cut film. I expose at ISO 25,
    then inspection develop (dark green safelight, short peeks)at about 5
    minutes or less in HC-110 Dil. B or 1:25 Rodinol, 68F. I have to hold
    back the development time, or it is much more contrasty than I might
    wish.
     
    Paul W. Ross, Jul 14, 2003
    #4
  5. Joseph Kewfi

    John Guest

    Why not use a more dilute developer ? Most use Rodinal 1:100 for 7 min. @
    70F.

    John
     
    John, Jul 15, 2003
    #5
  6. Do you want "normal" contrast negatives? Technical Pan is
    an inherently very high contrast material which will produce
    normal pictorial contrast with special developers. Diluting
    normal developers won't do although many practice this.
    Kodak Technidol is a special, very low contrast, Phenidone
    developer, designed to produce both low contrast and uniform
    development on Technical Pan. Because Tech Pan has a very
    thin emulsion (one reason its so sharp) a special agitation
    method must be used to avoid getting blotchy results.
    I shoot Tech Pan roll film at around ISO 12 to 25. With
    Technidol I get very nice negatives which print without much
    difficulty.
    One effect you will find is a sometimes odd tonal
    rendition due to the high red sensitivity of the film. It
    will tend to wash out skin tones unless a green filter is
    used. This can actually be flattering to people with
    blemishes.
    Technidol is expensive but I've never found anything else
    that gives really good results with this film.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Jul 24, 2003
    #6
  7. I've used C-41 developer
    (and the rest of the process regular B&W, fixer! etc.)
    with Tech Pan exposed at 25 ISO. It works very well.
    If you want the times I used (they are at home) e-mail me by cleaning up
    the line below:
     
    Sandorm Mathe, Aug 26, 2003
    #7
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