Latest Photo shoot

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Rob Novak, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. Rob Novak

    Rob Novak Guest

    The motorcycle shot's the best of the bunch - it's a really good
    standard action shot. However, there are a number of exposure
    problems and composition issues to address with a number of the
    others.

    If you're using an autoexposure mode on your camera, you might
    consider switching to center-weighted or AF-spot metering. In a lot
    of cases, especially when you're shooting landscapes with the sun low
    on the horizon, you're losing the foreground by exposing for the
    sun/sky/clouds. If that's the look you're going for (as with
    sunsetinwales.jpg) that's fine, but with the first image
    (fielddusk.jpg), the sky ends up washed out and the land's
    underexposed. Meter for one or the other - the contrast level's way
    beyond that of any digital sensor or film, and trying capture both the
    landscape *and* the sun is a losing proposition.

    The "catnap" photo is interesting. Watch your camera level - the
    whole thing's at a 20 degree angle (looking at the vertical element in
    the background), which suits a more frenetic subject. Same deal as
    above - lots of contrast, but the highlights are burnt out while
    shadow detail is non-existant. I'd also recompose this so that
    kitty's face isn't dead center in frame, as well as pull back from the
    subject and shoot telephoto - the prominent out-of-focus paw in
    foreground on the right side of frame is distracting. Or, close down
    the aperture and get both the paw and the face in focus.

    With your landscapes, try to avoid cutting the frame exactly in half
    with your horizon line.

    Shooting in stream beds or on rivers is hard. If you're shooting an
    upstream or downstream landscape, try to get to a higher elevation.
    Shooting standing at water level results in a flat image with little
    depth and no vanishing lines. "River" and "gorge" just don't go
    anywhere. I have big problems with this myself.

    The windmill shot has promise, but again the subject bisects the
    frame. Reshoot that with the windmill off to the left and more of the
    brilliant blue and wispy clouds on the right, and you've got a super
    image.

    It looks like you've a decent eye - keep practicing.
     
    Rob Novak, Aug 11, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Rob Novak

    matt Guest

    matt, Aug 11, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Rob:

    Your ability to view the pictures and analyze the composition of the shot and its logistics
    in its making is intriguing.

    I wish I had a web site for you to be able to access and seriously critique pictures I have
    taken.

    Dave




    | On Wed, 11 Aug 2004 19:55:32 GMT, "matt" <>
    | wrote:
    |
    | >Hi I have just uploaded my latest photos to www.food-police.co.uk any feed
    | >back welcome..
    | >
    |
    | The motorcycle shot's the best of the bunch - it's a really good
    | standard action shot. However, there are a number of exposure
    | problems and composition issues to address with a number of the
    | others.
    |
    | If you're using an autoexposure mode on your camera, you might
    | consider switching to center-weighted or AF-spot metering. In a lot
    | of cases, especially when you're shooting landscapes with the sun low
    | on the horizon, you're losing the foreground by exposing for the
    | sun/sky/clouds. If that's the look you're going for (as with
    | sunsetinwales.jpg) that's fine, but with the first image
    | (fielddusk.jpg), the sky ends up washed out and the land's
    | underexposed. Meter for one or the other - the contrast level's way
    | beyond that of any digital sensor or film, and trying capture both the
    | landscape *and* the sun is a losing proposition.
    |
    | The "catnap" photo is interesting. Watch your camera level - the
    | whole thing's at a 20 degree angle (looking at the vertical element in
    | the background), which suits a more frenetic subject. Same deal as
    | above - lots of contrast, but the highlights are burnt out while
    | shadow detail is non-existant. I'd also recompose this so that
    | kitty's face isn't dead center in frame, as well as pull back from the
    | subject and shoot telephoto - the prominent out-of-focus paw in
    | foreground on the right side of frame is distracting. Or, close down
    | the aperture and get both the paw and the face in focus.
    |
    | With your landscapes, try to avoid cutting the frame exactly in half
    | with your horizon line.
    |
    | Shooting in stream beds or on rivers is hard. If you're shooting an
    | upstream or downstream landscape, try to get to a higher elevation.
    | Shooting standing at water level results in a flat image with little
    | depth and no vanishing lines. "River" and "gorge" just don't go
    | anywhere. I have big problems with this myself.
    |
    | The windmill shot has promise, but again the subject bisects the
    | frame. Reshoot that with the windmill off to the left and more of the
    | brilliant blue and wispy clouds on the right, and you've got a super
    | image.
    |
    | It looks like you've a decent eye - keep practicing.
    |
    | --
    | Central Maryland Photographer's Guild
    | http://cmpg.org
     
    David H. Lipman, Aug 12, 2004
    #3
  4. Rob Novak

    Rob Novak Guest

    Thanks for the compliments, Dave. At least once a month I get
    together with a number of other photographers and we actively critique
    each others' work. My wife and I do the same at home. I'm constantly
    analyzing every roll of film or batch of files off the CF cards as I
    get them, noting what techniques worked and which didn't. I'm no
    guru, but I constantly attempt to improve on my previous photos. I'll
    go back on location and reshoot things differently if I don't get the
    desired results the first time.
     
    Rob Novak, Aug 12, 2004
    #4
  5. Too bad I'm in NJ not in Maryland :)

    Dave




    | On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 00:34:27 GMT, "David H. Lipman"
    |
    | >Your ability to view the pictures and analyze the composition of the shot and its
    logistics
    | >in its making is intriguing.
    | >I wish I had a web site for you to be able to access and seriously critique pictures I
    have
    | >taken.
    |
    | Thanks for the compliments, Dave. At least once a month I get
    | together with a number of other photographers and we actively critique
    | each others' work. My wife and I do the same at home. I'm constantly
    | analyzing every roll of film or batch of files off the CF cards as I
    | get them, noting what techniques worked and which didn't. I'm no
    | guru, but I constantly attempt to improve on my previous photos. I'll
    | go back on location and reshoot things differently if I don't get the
    | desired results the first time.
    |
    | --
    | Central Maryland Photographers' Guild:
    | http://www.cmpg.org
     
    David H. Lipman, Aug 12, 2004
    #5
  6. Rob Novak

    Bruce O'Neal Guest

    i like your motorcycle, windmill, and also the water (ocean) pics. very
    nice!

    _bruce
     
    Bruce O'Neal, Aug 12, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.