LCD Monitor - photo editing?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by DonB, Aug 24, 2005.

  1. DonB

    DonB Guest

    I am considering moving to a 19" LCD monitor, and comparative magazine
    reviews gave the Editors pick as the Sony HS95P, saying excellent photo
    display, contrast etc.
    However Googling brought up one buyer who said he could not edit images
    on it. Why his difficulties were was not said.
    Does anyone know about editing on LCD monitors, and have you had any
    trouble?
    Thanks,
    Don
     
    DonB, Aug 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. DonB

    Larry Lynch Guest

    Since the Panel of an LCD monitor is "back lit" with a fluorescent
    light, it can be difficult to get a proper rendering of the "black"
    areas of a photo. Since a properly calibrated CRT doesnt have this
    problem, its a little easier to use a CRT.

    Im sure in a controlled environment you can use good LCD screens for
    photo editing, but keep in mind what the faults may be.

    On even the very best LCD monitors, the dark and black areas are harder
    to judge than they are on a CRT.

    Keep in mind that the highest quality LCD monitors are FAR more
    expensive than a good CRT.. But then get used to the difference, CRTs
    are losing ground to LCD monitors even in applications where a good CRT
    is the thing to use.
     
    Larry Lynch, Aug 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. Also consider ...

    LCD Color: 8-Bit vs. 6-Bit
    http://compreviews.about.com/od/multimedia/a/LCDColor.htm

    6-Bit/16.2 panel colors are dithered up to look like 8-Bit/16.7
    million colors. [RGB - 8-bits / channel = 24-bit true colors]

    Examples:

    ViewSonic VP191b ... 16.7m colors
    Samsung SyncMaster 193P+ ... 16.7m colors

    LG L1980Q ... 16.2m colors
    Sony SDM-HS95P ... 16.2m colors

    The LG and Sony's I just mentioned are absolutely gorgeous looking
    monitors but I refuse to pay their high prices for a 6-bit panel.

    Note: some manufacturers avoid listing 6-bit 16.2m colors in their
    spec sheets. If I don't find 16.7m colors listed I consider the
    monitor to be 6-bit. Retailers seldom list this info.

    I'm hanging onto this aging 21" ViewSonic P815 CRT to see what the new
    LED monitors are likeā€”early 2006.

    Hap
     
    Hap Shaughnessy, Aug 24, 2005
    #3
  4. DonB

    Beach Bum Guest

    reviews gave the Editors pick as the Sony HS95P, saying excellent photo
    One of the problems I had with early LCD's was the fact that the image isn't
    illuminated equally. IOW, if you move your head up the top of the image
    seems darker than the bottom, and vice versa. With any CRT this problem
    simply doesn't exist. While LCD's are much better today, I still wouldn't
    want to pay the amount required to get one on which professional photo
    editing would be possible. For much less you can get a very high end CRT.
    I've been working on 19inch for 6 years. I'd like to move up to 25 or more.
    You might find 19 too small pretty quickly.
     
    Beach Bum, Aug 24, 2005
    #4
  5. DonB

    Jeremy Nixon Guest

    To use an LCD, you need a *really good* one. One test -- look at the
    screen while moving your head around so that you see it from different
    angles. Many LCDs will change in brightness and/or color depending on
    what angle you look at them from. If you can go almost out to 90
    degrees both vertically and horizontally without any change, that's a
    good sign. If it appears darker or the colors change as the angle
    increases, pass.
     
    Jeremy Nixon, Aug 24, 2005
    #5
  6. DonB

    bmoag Guest

    Although they are improving it is more difficult to judge subtle color and
    contrast gradations on an LCD than on a CRT.
    However CRTs in general are over-rated in their real world ability to
    display the range from black to white they are supposed to.
    Niether of these factors may make a difference to the way you work if you do
    not make subtle adjustments of this sort in Photoshop. An LCD can be
    calibrated and as such be used in a reasonably reliable way for basic
    monitor color matching/color management.
    I
     
    bmoag, Aug 24, 2005
    #6
  7. DonB

    eawckyegcy Guest

    Sir! Your vile heresies against the One True Religion of the
    Flickering Tube have been noted by the devout. The CRT Central
    Committee of Worship will be drawing up another Fatwa shortly, and you
    can expect your name to figure prominently on it.
     
    eawckyegcy, Aug 24, 2005
    #7
  8. DonB

    tomm101 Guest

    At my office had a good CRT, it died, the IT dept replaced it with a
    rotten CRT, really had editing problems on that one. It has been
    replaced with an HP 1940 LCD. I'm happy, editing is a dream with this
    monitor. Two years ago I was in another office doing some for hire
    work, they had what they called a state of the art editing system,
    couldn't stand the Viewsonic LCD, get in close and it was all pixels,
    very disorienting, the black was awful too. At home I use a 19" Lacie
    Electron Blue CRT and a Gateway with a Sony Trinatron tube.

    Tom
     
    tomm101, Aug 24, 2005
    #8
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