Leaf shutter lens on a focal-plane shutter camera?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Lunaray, Nov 2, 2003.

  1. Lunaray

    Lunaray Guest

    I'm considering purchasing a Pentax 67 II camera which has a cloth
    focal-plane shutter, and Pentax makes a "leaf-shutter" telephoto lens for it
    (SMC P67 L.S. 165mm F4.0) How does this work? I understand the advantage
    of a "leaf shutter" (less vibration), but how does this work with a
    focal-plane-shutter camera?

    Thanks all!
     
    Lunaray, Nov 2, 2003
    #1
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  2. The biggest advantage to a camera that has a 'between the lens' (BTL)
    shutter is that you have flash sync no matter what the shutter speed.
    Whereas with a focal plane shutter, you need to have a shutter speed usually
    of 1/60 (some 1/90 or 1/100) in order to be in sync with the flash.
     
    Nicole Piotrkowski, Nov 2, 2003
    #2
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  3. Lunaray

    Lunaray Guest

    Well okay, but how does a camera with two shutters work? Is there a control
    to choose which shutter to use, the camera shutter, or the lens shutter? I
    suppose that the focal-plane shutter in the camera would be locked open when
    this type of lens was used, and the exposure would be controlled by the lens
    shutter. Is there a mechanism on the camera that detects when a
    leaf-shutter lens is attached and therefore locks the focal-plane shutter
    open?

    Thanks!
     
    Lunaray, Nov 2, 2003
    #3
  4. Lunaray

    purplefish Guest

    I have never heard of a camera with two shutters. That would make things a
    little redundent (sp?) wouldn't it. I would think that the best thing to do
    is to throw a roll of film into it and muck around with everything
    (including flash sync speed) and see what ya get.
     
    purplefish, Nov 5, 2003
    #4
  5. Well all of the Speed Graphic cameras usually had two shutters. Many
    Hassleblads could have two shutters. There is no redundance involved. Quite
    simply only one shutter is used at a time. Simple as that!
     
    Jackof-the-Dust, Nov 5, 2003
    #5
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