Lens board illuminator

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by drhowarddrfinedrhoward, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. I found a used Beseler 45M enlarger. Now I'm looking for a lens board for
    it. I noticed some lens boards come with an "illuminator". What is that
    for and how is it used?
     
    drhowarddrfinedrhoward, Feb 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. It's a little plastic piece that goes through the board, basically a light
    pipe that shines light (from behind the lens) on the aperture scale so you can
    see it.


    --
    It's fun to demonize the neo-cons and rejoice in their discomfiture, but
    don't make the mistake of thinking US foreign policy was set by Norman
    Podhoretz or William Kristol. They're the clowns capering about in front of
    the donkey and the elephant. The donkey says the UN should clean up after
    them, and the elephant now says the donkey may have a point. Somebody has
    come out with a dustpan and broom.

    - Alexander Cockburn, _CounterPunch_
    (http://www.counterpunch.org), 9/17/03
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. It shines a little red light on the f stop numbers when the
    enlarger light is on so you can read them in the dark.
    Just count clicks as you turn the ring instead..
     
    Robert Feinman, Feb 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Thanks guys.

    Is the light a concern when doing color development?
     
    drhowarddrfinedrhoward, Feb 26, 2004
    #4
  5. I did color enlarging with the illuminated lensboards for years without
    issues; never thought about it until now. Still, theoretically you
    MIGHT get a little scatter - not that the illumination was all that
    useful anyway, at least with my eyes. I always counted clicks.
     
    Scott Schuckert, Feb 26, 2004
    #5
  6. drhowarddrfinedrhoward

    Nick Zentena Guest


    Some of my lensboards have it. They were all bought used and in every case
    the thing was blocked up one way or the other so it doesn't work. So
    somebody decided it wasn't worth having.

    I doubt the light would effect colour too much. Some of the newer
    lenses light up the aperture.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, Feb 26, 2004
    #6
  7. Except they are never bright enough to see the scale in the dark.

    So I just count clicks. One of my lenses permits me to turn off the
    click-stops, but I do not do that.
     
    Jean-David Beyer, Feb 26, 2004
    #7
  8. The best solution is Rodenstock's "pre-set" aperture lock; set it, and one
    simple twist and you're at your selected stop. Now if only my other lenses had
    that feature ...


    --
    It's fun to demonize the neo-cons and rejoice in their discomfiture, but
    don't make the mistake of thinking US foreign policy was set by Norman
    Podhoretz or William Kristol. They're the clowns capering about in front of
    the donkey and the elephant. The donkey says the UN should clean up after
    them, and the elephant now says the donkey may have a point. Somebody has
    come out with a dustpan and broom.

    - Alexander Cockburn, _CounterPunch_
    (http://www.counterpunch.org), 9/17/03
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 26, 2004
    #8
  9. Agreed. Probably has to do with fogging color paper if they were
    brighter.

    But then, most modern lenses have illuminated f-stops making the
    Beseler illuminator redundant.
    That I don't do, what with two turrets worth of lenses the internal
    dialog goes as: "Lets see, the 135 is an f4, or is it an f5.6,
    and are the clicks full stop or half stop? They are half
    stop on the 105 so ... no that one's a Rodenstock and this
    ones a Nikkor ... or is it the other way around. Turn on the
    bloody light..."

    I like the illuminated f-stop dials on most lenses. On the ones
    that aren't illuminated I now use a little homemade red LED penlight.

    I invariably have the 'Did I stop the lens down doubts' as my
    finger hovers over the timer's 'expose' button.
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Feb 26, 2004
    #9
  10. drhowarddrfinedrhoward

    Bob Salomon Guest

    Modern optics like the Rodagon, Apo-Rodagon, etc. have not only an
    illuminated aperture but also a dis-engageable click stop control and a
    pre-set aperture which allows you to go directly between open aperture
    and the aperture you want to print at. This takes away those doubts.
     
    Bob Salomon, Feb 26, 2004
    #10
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