Lens pens for sensor cleaning

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by Don, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. Don

    Don Guest

    Folks

    I have just ordered some lens pens and the Birds as Art instructions for
    using them to clean sensors. Has anybody else tried this method yet?

    Links as follows:

    http://www.birdsasart.com/lenspens.htm
     
    Don, Apr 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Don

    kosh Guest

    would like to see a photo to confirm that is is the same product known
    as the "LensPen" shown here : http://lenspen.com/

    then I would not let it touch a sensor with a 10 foot lightstand! The
    tip is impregnated with a material which appears black when it is in
    excess quantity.... would be impossible to get off the sensor once it is
    there.

    this said, the lenspen is a great product... but for lenses and LCD
    screens only!

    kosh
     
    kosh, Apr 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. Don

    Don Guest

    Kosh

    and their within the "black stuff" lays the trick. The file you receive
    when purchasing the pens etc deals with this and a range of other issues. I
    also note that the photographer in question (A Morris) is a Canon contract
    photographer and his work is pretty impressive, along with his reputation.
    I am happy to take his word for using the pens as a sensor cleaner and have
    followed the development of this for some time. I note that at least one
    major camera supplier/manufacturer uses lens pens for this purpose. Lots of
    information on this matter on US web sites. I will keep this group posted as
    to my success/failures with this method.

    regards

    Don from Down Under
     
    Don, Apr 16, 2006
    #3
  4. Don

    hmmmn Guest

    I am currently looking into buying my first dslr so this post caught my
    eye...If this is such a huge problem for digital slr's why arent all
    manufacturers doing something like Olympus on the E-500 etc?

    Is it a problem? Is it a beat up? I would be glad to read of your
    experiences with dirty sensors/sensor cleaning ...

    Thanks
     
    hmmmn, Apr 17, 2006
    #4
  5. Don

    POTD.com.au Guest


    It's not as big a problem as many would have you think and cleaning the
    sensor is quite quick and easy. Yes there are those that have a "real"
    problem in that nothing they do gets their sensor clean, but what is the
    exact cause of that I don't know.

    I can only talk form my experience of 4 DSLRs and I have had no issues with
    self cleaning.

    Rusty
    My Gallery: http://www.pixelpix.com.au
     
    POTD.com.au, Apr 17, 2006
    #5
  6. Don

    Don Guest

    hmmmm

    dust can be a problem but self cleaning is not the bogey man many make out.
    A lot will depend on your shooting environment, and how often you change
    lenses etc. I have been using Visible Dust products but find that in some
    instances they are just not enough. I have more of a problem with my 20D for
    some reason over my 1Dmk11 and the 350D. Not sure why but it probably
    relates to how often I change lenses. I do a lot of dog shots in peoples
    homes as well as having two very shaggy and malting dogs myself. I would
    like to see Canon do something like the Olympus but I haven't met or talked
    with anyone who is actually using the E-500 to see how it works. Don't let
    the dust issue scare you off digital its just a side issue not a real
    problem.

    regards

    Don
     
    Don, Apr 17, 2006
    #6
  7. Don

    kosh Guest

    personally I have yet to have/hear a satisfactory answer to what the
    long term effects of ultrasonic vibrations on/near the sensor and
    electronics will be.

    In relaity there are few problems with dust unless you are a bit anal,
    or work in areas rpone to it.... there are also several very good
    cleaning methods , shoul dyou be unfortunate enough to get a noticeable
    spot....

    nb. noticeable in a print..... not magnified 500x in photoshop!


    kosh
     
    kosh, Apr 17, 2006
    #7
  8. Don

    Stew Guest

    When I used to do nature work (mostly waterfalls and wildlife/fauna) I spent 3 weeks camping in
    bushland, and in that time changed my lenses quite a lot. The problem I found was not dust on the
    sensor but on the actually filter end of the lens itself.

    Once only did I get a speck on the sensor and a gentle blow with a air blower solved that.
    I would not like to use a brush on a sensor though as you might find train tracks on your next images.

    Stew
     
    Stew, Apr 18, 2006
    #8
  9. Don

    hmmmn Guest

    Thanks everyone.
     
    hmmmn, Apr 20, 2006
    #9
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