Longevity of Inkjet Photo Paper and Inkjet inks

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by JP White, Dec 27, 2003.

  1. JP White

    JP White Guest

    Now that I have printer that can actually print a photo fairly well, I'm
    sure I'll use it a fair bit. Before expending time and money on home
    made prints I want to make sure my photos will last a decent amount of
    time. I can always reprint images displayed at home, but I'd hate to
    give someone a photo as a gift and have it fade within a year.

    I've printed color photos at work on inkjet photographic paper using
    standard HP inks. I've noticed that photos under a fluorescent light
    fade to a heavy green cast within 6 months. Other photos printed on
    plain 'ol low grade copier paper do not fade. So I don't think the fault
    is with the inks. Other photos taken 8 years ago and printed from 35mm
    negatives at Wolf on standard photographic paper have held up very well
    under the exact same lighting conditions.

    What brands/types of paper would you suggest I use to avoid rapid fading
    of images?

    Do Canon inks hold up well?

    FWIW I've got a Canon i475D.

    JP
     
    JP White, Dec 27, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. JP White

    stupid_idiot Guest

    FWIW....I only use my inkjet printers for proof copies...it is more cost effective to use an online photoprinter for archive
    quality. Also, Costco nationally has updated their didge printer and you can just bring them a digital file.
     
    stupid_idiot, Dec 27, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. JP White

    VincentJames Guest

    I don't know about Canon, but it seems many swear by Epson papers and inks.
    One of the definitive sources on image longevity is:
    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/
     
    VincentJames, Dec 27, 2003
    #3
  4. JP White

    JP White Guest

    Thanks for the link, the articles are just what I needed. At least I can
    now make an informed choice. No more office depot paper.

    Thanks

    JP
     
    JP White, Dec 27, 2003
    #4
  5. JP White

    Stephan Guest

    Mr. Wilhelm must be a vampire living in a very dark room in a dark castle
    hidden in a dark forest if his prints made on a Epson 1280 last him 27
    years.
    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/PCWorld_FadeFactor_Nov_2002.pdf
    On my sunny Island of Oahu in Hawaii in my "plantation" house under the big
    mango tree I am lucky if they last me a few month. (on the Canon I had
    earlier fading was noticeable in a matter of days
    I have my prints done on a Fuji Frontier, cheaper in the end and I don't
    have to worry about clients calling me because their photos look terrible
    after a short while.

    Stephan
     
    Stephan, Dec 27, 2003
    #5
  6. JP White

    JP White Guest

    This seems like a good idea for those 'special' photos I want to look
    good and ensure last a while.

    I have always wondered why they charge so much for digital reprints. In
    the good ol days one could easily understand why reprinting from a
    negative was labor intensive.

    The cost of paper and printing can't be that high if they can print 35mm
    24 exposure rolls for $5.99 (or less) which includes the processing cost
    too.

    It seems to me that they would sell a lot more digital prints if they
    dropped the prices. The process must be fairly automated (no fiddly
    negative strips to unpack, handle carefully and return).

    Does anyone know the difference in technology that Costo or Wolf use for
    digital prints versus the 'kiosk' type devices in drug stores?

    JP
     
    JP White, Dec 27, 2003
    #6
  7. JP White

    JP White Guest

    Following this line of thought I googled Fuji Frontier and found a
    really useful resource in Dry Creek Photo. They have icc profiles for a
    good number of labs in the US. Aparently they provide profiles to the
    labs as a service and allow you to download it so you can prepare your
    images for the exact printer at the store you'll visit. Neat.

    http://drycreekphoto.com/

    JP
     
    JP White, Dec 27, 2003
    #7
  8. JP White

    Joe Guest

    I don't know how you can come up with higher price to make thing hard to
    chose. SAM's Club charges 19 cents for 4x6" (24x19 = $4.56 you save $1.33 +
    a roll of film) and Wal-Mart charges around 26 cents a pop (26x24 = $6.24 it
    costs you a stick of gum, but save you few bucks on rool of film)
    I sometime bring a CD with 200-300+ photos and let Wal-Mart do the
    printing for me, and usually have to wait for 3-4 hours for that amount (or
    1 hr if under 100 photos or so). If I need to print more (for friends or
    relatives from other states) then I upload to theie web sites and let
    friends and relatives pick whatever they want to print (few times I upload
    700-800 photos to their web pages).
    I know Wal-Mart and SAM's Club use different paper and the photos printed
    by SAM's Club is darker than Wal-Mart. My son prints his at SAM's because
    it saves him some bucks, I print mine at Wal-Mart because the one I take
    picture for paying for their own prints, and they don't need to have
    membersip card to get in to pick their photos etc..

    I can't compare the quality besides the darker and lighter, cuz I son
    takes his photos using cheaper digital camera and shoot at lower resolution
    (so he can take more picture), when I use higher resolution with more
    powerful (external) flash etc.. But they all look better than 35mm film.
     
    Joe, Dec 27, 2003
    #8
  9. JP White

    Stephan Guest

    Yes, I am waiting for my labs profile but they are kind of busy around this
    time I guess.

    Stephan
     
    Stephan, Dec 27, 2003
    #9
  10. JP White

    stupid_idiot Guest

    http://northstarmultimedia.mye-pix.com/ezdirect/PricingPage.asp

    This is my pricing from my printing franchise....I use this mostly for my clients and myself...but, the color reproduction WITHOUT
    icc profiles amazes me still.


    I don't know how you can come up with higher price to make thing hard to
    chose. SAM's Club charges 19 cents for 4x6" (24x19 = $4.56 you save $1.33 +
    a roll of film) and Wal-Mart charges around 26 cents a pop (26x24 = $6.24 it
    costs you a stick of gum, but save you few bucks on rool of film)
    I sometime bring a CD with 200-300+ photos and let Wal-Mart do the
    printing for me, and usually have to wait for 3-4 hours for that amount (or
    1 hr if under 100 photos or so). If I need to print more (for friends or
    relatives from other states) then I upload to theie web sites and let
    friends and relatives pick whatever they want to print (few times I upload
    700-800 photos to their web pages).
    I know Wal-Mart and SAM's Club use different paper and the photos printed
    by SAM's Club is darker than Wal-Mart. My son prints his at SAM's because
    it saves him some bucks, I print mine at Wal-Mart because the one I take
    picture for paying for their own prints, and they don't need to have
    membersip card to get in to pick their photos etc..

    I can't compare the quality besides the darker and lighter, cuz I son
    takes his photos using cheaper digital camera and shoot at lower resolution
    (so he can take more picture), when I use higher resolution with more
    powerful (external) flash etc.. But they all look better than 35mm film.
     
    stupid_idiot, Dec 27, 2003
    #10
  11. JP White

    VincentJames Guest

    Hey, and thanks to you too. I am following through on the Fuji Frontier
    piece also and will see what I come up with at drycreekphoto. This is
    what makes these newsgroups work.
     
    VincentJames, Dec 28, 2003
    #11
  12. JP White

    Hecate Guest

    Good quality ones like Ilford Gallerie.
    No. I've just been reading an article about print longevity and of the
    three major makes of printers, the two longest lasting inks were HP
    ()the longest) and Epson. You may be using an older HP that isn't a
    photo printer. However, for longer life you really need to use the
    pigment inks yo8u can get from either MSI or Permajet. As long as you
    don't hang the things in sunlight they should have good longevity.
    Then you're stuffed because the above ink makers only make inks for
    Epson printers. You'll be far better off getting photographic prints
    made from your files on photographic paper.
     
    Hecate, Dec 28, 2003
    #12
  13. JP White

    LLutton Guest

    I know Wal-Mart and SAM's Club use different paper

    My Walmart and Sams in Flint, Michigan both use the Fuji Frontier to print
    images so I assume they use the same paper. Make sure you go to the One hour
    lab. The Kiosks (do it yourself) charge a lot more and I think those prints are
    more similar to inkjet prints. Also, Ritz Camera uses the Fuji Frontier.
    Lynn
     
    LLutton, Dec 28, 2003
    #13
  14. JP White

    JP White Guest

    At least I'm not as stuffed as I would have been had I invested a lot of
    time and money in prints that wouldn't hold up to candlelight. I'm glad
    I asked. Proof printer it is, it's better than a poke in the eye with a
    blunt stick.

    JP
     
    JP White, Dec 28, 2003
    #14
  15. JP White

    Stephan Guest

    Stephan, Dec 28, 2003
    #15
  16. JP White

    stupid_idiot Guest

    u right...it is painful....prefab from the lab.

     
    stupid_idiot, Dec 28, 2003
    #16
  17. JP White

    Paul J Gans Guest

    Don't be too upset. Conventional photographic prints are
    not terribly long lived either -- but live longer than
    many inkjet prints.

    Fading is a long-established problem. You've seen outdoor
    posters with faded reds. Up until fairly recently red paints
    used on cars faded too.

    Inkjet ink is subject to other problems as well. All I'll
    add is that almost all of today's inks are better than they
    were three years ago.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Dec 31, 2003
    #17
  18. JP White

    Paul J Gans Guest

    And the older you are, the worse it will be. The
    human eye is not totally color corrected and red and
    blue do not focus at the same depth. So the eye
    keeps switching between focussing on the blue and
    focussing on the red. Gives me a nice shimmering
    headache after not too long...

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Dec 31, 2003
    #18
  19. JP White

    Pixmaker Guest

    Regarding the non-color-corrected human eye and the eye's inability to focus certain wavelengths near the edge of the
    visible spectrum...

    The next time you happen to be on an airliner at night, look out the window while the plane is moving along a taxiway
    lined with those dark blue lights. Depending upon your eyes, your age and other parameters (including how many drinks
    you've had during the trip,) you probably will have difficulty bringing those lights into sharp focus.

    Interesting, huh?

    DaveinFLL
    ==========================
    It's not the heat, it's the humidity!
    ==========================
    (Think the humidity's bad?
    You should watch us vote!)
     
    Pixmaker, Dec 31, 2003
    #19
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.