Looking for (second hand) prime macro on the cheap

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Brendan Gillatt, Nov 17, 2007.

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    I'm looking to buy a good, crisp prime macro on the cheap (student budget).

    I already inherited a Nikkor Micro f2.8 50mm macro which works great
    except that it's manual focus and the optics aren't quite as bright as
    some of the modern lenses. I also have to use a 12mm extension tube to
    let it fit properly on my D50, limiting my DOF severely.

    I'm looking for things similar to the Tamron 90mm f2.8, though around
    £150. I know that's quite low but I'm sure there must be some nice stuff
    out there. I'm not worried about IS or a telephoto focal length.

    Does anyone have any recommendations as to what would be a good lens or
    where I could look for second hand in Cornwall, UK.

    Thank you in advance,
    Brendan

    - --
    Brendan Gillatt
    brendan {at} brendangillatt {dot} co {dot} uk
    http://www.brendangillatt.co.uk
    PGP Key: http://pgp.mit.edu:11371/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xBACD7433
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    Brendan Gillatt, Nov 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. Doing macro with a 50mm lense is a bit confining,
    primarily because of the extremely short working
    distance.

    If you are doing relatively moderate magnification, say
    for flowers or other items where you don't approach a
    1:1 magnification, then a 50mm lense is okay. Likewise
    the same is true or Auto Focus and any sort of image
    stabilization.
    Do worry about focal length! If you want to make high
    magnification images of things you cannot get close to
    (rattle snakes are a good example), longer focal lengths
    have many advantages...

    Otherwise, it happens that 90-105mm fits into a sweet
    spot for sharpness. There don't seem to be any macro
    lenses at those focal lengths which are not described as
    superduper tack sharp. In terms of being sharp,
    virtually all of them are.

    If you work at 1:1 or higher magnifications, the AF and
    VR features are of little value, and a much less
    expensive older MF lense will work just as well. It's
    when you are not using a tripod and magnification isn't
    that high, that you'll want the features of modern
    designs.
    Check eBay. Off the top of my head, if you need AF and
    VR, go for a Nikkor 105mm macro. If you are comfortable
    with a good tripod and want to take pictures of the
    sharp end of a tack, find a Kiron made 105mm macro
    lense. They might be labled as a Vivitar with a serial
    number starting with 22, or as a Lester A. Dine lense,
    or more rarely as a Kiron or Panagor.
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Nov 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. www.kevinkienlein.com, Nov 18, 2007
    #3
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    Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    [snip]

    Thank you, very informative.

    - --
    Brendan Gillatt
    brendan {at} brendangillatt {dot} co {dot} uk
    http://www.brendangillatt.co.uk
    PGP Key: http://pgp.mit.edu:11371/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xBACD7433
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    Brendan Gillatt, Nov 18, 2007
    #4
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