Lumix G3 question

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Pastime, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    When I hook my G3 up to my PC using the USB cable, and select PC mode
    on the camera, I can copy files off the camera with no problems.
    However, I can't delete files from the SD card or do anything else
    that updates it. That means that after a copy I have to use the
    camera's menus to delete the photos I've just copied.

    On the camera's LCD screen, it periodically flashes the word "ACCESS"
    in red - not sure if that's an error or just telling me that the
    camera's in communication with the PC.

    Any ideas about what's happening here? Thanks.
     
    Pastime, Nov 15, 2012
    #1
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  2. Pastime

    Savageduck Guest

    If all else fails, RTFM;
    < http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/DMCG3_ADV.PDF >

    ....but personally I suggest buying a card reader.
    < http://elagostore.com/category/23634553781/1/Card-Reader.htm >
     
    Savageduck, Nov 15, 2012
    #2
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  3. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    I did, but it doesn't answer the question.
    I have a card reader, but it would be easier to use the USB connection
    if that were possible. But yes, on reflection it would be easier to
    use the reader than the camera's menus, especially for selective
    deleting.

    Thanks.
     
    Pastime, Nov 15, 2012
    #3
  4. Pastime

    ray Guest

    I would hope the situation has been rectified, but in the past there have
    been reports of corruption from deleting files. It seems that the file
    management was not as robust as it should have been. Personally, I don't
    delete files. I either leave them there or format the card in the camera.
     
    ray, Nov 15, 2012
    #4
  5. Pastime

    Savageduck Guest

    If that is the case, I believe Panasonic is saving you from yourself
    and potential heartache and card corruption by preventing selective
    deletion on your computer.
    For most here the preferred method of transfer is via card reader. The
    USB camera-computer connection is a method of last resort for me.

    Selective deleting from a CF/SDHC via computer is not a particularly
    good idea. I believe that if you polled the usual participants in the
    photo-groups you will find that the great majority transfer their image
    files from CF/SDHC card to computer, enable whatever backup protocol
    they might be employing, and then reformat the card.

    If you insist on making individual selective deletes, make them using
    the camera's menu features, not selectively on your computer, even with
    a card reader. Otherwise you might return to the group to inquire about
    recovering files from a corrupted card.
     
    Savageduck, Nov 15, 2012
    #5
  6. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    Thanks to both of you; I'd not heard of this corruption problem. I
    think I need to devise a different workflow so that I copy new
    pictures from the card to the PC without deleting them from the card
    each time, and periodically reformat the card.
     
    Pastime, Nov 15, 2012
    #6
  7. Pastime

    tony cooper Guest

    My normal workflow is to remove the card from the camera, upload the
    images via card reader, check to see if the images have been
    successfully uploaded, and then to replace the card in the camera and
    reformat the card.

    If the images are special in some way, I insert an extra step by
    copying the files from the computer to my external back-up drive
    before reformatting the card. This gives me two sets of copies for
    the special images. For an ordinary set of images, I back-up the
    files either weekly or when I feel I've uploaded a significant number
    of images.

    Most of my images are rather ordinary, and none are paid jobs.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 15, 2012
    #7
  8. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    I keep a picture (as the first one on the card) that has my name and
    phone number and an offer of a reward, so I'd either copy that to the
    card at this stage or (probably better, if file system corruption is a
    possible issue) display it on the PC screen and photograph it.
    Yeah, but backups are very important. After years of being rather lax
    on that issue, I now back up nightly to a pair of external HDDs, and
    also back up to the "cloud" nightly with CrashPlan. In this case, I'd
    run a nightly backup ad hoc before formatting the card, or leave the
    formatting until the morning after.

    Like you say, my images are nothing special - kind of postcardy mostly
    - other than having personal meaning to me because they're *my*
    postcardy photos.
     
    Pastime, Nov 16, 2012
    #8
  9. People concerned about intellectual property rights and privacy may like to
    consider encrypting their data before uploading it to a third party.

    If you have friends, whether personal or business, a mutual backup
    arrangement can be cheap and effective.
     
    Charles E. Hardwidge, Nov 16, 2012
    #9
  10. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    Indeed. For Windows users, I can recommend an application called
    SafeHouse Explorer for data encryption - very simple and quick in
    operation. It will store your encrypted files and folders in a single
    file, and when you open that file with the correct password, it will
    mount the data as a drive letter and you can work on it from there.
    Crashplan (Windows, Linux, Mac) will do that as part of the free
    package - if you both have it installed you can back up to one
    another's computers very easily and automatically.
     
    Pastime, Nov 16, 2012
    #10
  11. Pastime

    Mort Guest

    Hi,

    May I make 2 suggestions, repeating previous postings?

    1) Never delete a photo SD card in a computer or another camera. Delete
    only in the same camera that took the photos.

    2) Never, never, never transfer images from the camera to a computer by
    a cable. If anything untoward happens, including a drop in battery
    voltage, then you may lose all your images, or have them corrupted. Get
    a good card reader. They are not expensive.

    Mort Linder
     
    Mort, Nov 18, 2012
    #11
  12. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    This is very interesting. I guess it goes without saying that it's a
    pretty appalling state of affairs when 2012 cameras can't handle
    memory cards properly (I just checked, and the first PCMCIA cards came
    out in 1991), but thankfully the workaround is simple enough, and I'll
    be using my card reader (and the camera's format feature) from now on.

    Thanks to everyone who replied.
     
    Pastime, Nov 19, 2012
    #12
  13. Pastime

    David Kerber Guest

    I have seen people saying this before, but I have never had a problem
    deleting images from the card when I used a card reader on the computer.
    This is using a T1i (500D) and 16GB SD cards, and nearly 20k shots.
    Agree with this one.
     
    David Kerber, Nov 21, 2012
    #13
  14. Pastime

    ray Guest

    How are you liking the G3? I got mine this summer but haven't done as
    much with it as I'd like. I did get an adapter to use my old manual
    Minolta lenses and they look really good.
     
    ray, Nov 21, 2012
    #14
  15. Pastime

    Pastime Guest

    I absolutely love it. It's a pleasure to use, easy and quick but also
    with plenty of flexibility, and I'm very impressed with the quality of
    the images I'm getting out of it.

    Mostly I use it for HDR, and the auto-bracketting feature is ideal for
    that, but I'm impressed with the results of anything I've done with
    it.
     
    Pastime, Nov 23, 2012
    #15
  16. If the camera does implement
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_rule_for_Camera_File_system
    DCIM correctly, nothing untoward will happen.
    That would require a *very* pessimal implementation in the
    camera, when mere reading a card can alter the content of
    the card. Not saying that can't happen, there are pretty bad
    firmwares out there.

    (BTW, if you suffer a brownout while accessing the card via
    card reader, the very same problem applies.)

    However, note that if you write to the card --- e.g. take
    a photo --- your statement is true: partial changes of the
    data stuctures of the card can cause a loss of data[1].
    Therefore, never, never, never take photos with your camera
    if there are already photos on the inserted card. Note also
    that writing *does* take a bit of power and the shooting
    and converting the photo does take *quite* a bit of power,
    so a drop in battery voltage at this point is a sure thing,
    the only question is whether it is critical --- and therefore,
    if the camera correctly judged that it would be not critical
    even with all the power use before actuating the shutter.

    Especially cameras using random AA batteries must eitehr leave
    a huge safety margin for the really bad cells and battery
    technologies, or suffer from critical power drops during
    shooting and card writiing.

    A card reader is better for quite different reasons, like not
    draining power from the camera battery and reporting as mass
    storage. However, this requires some sort of layout similar
    to DCF. A pessimal implementation of a camera might well only
    allow external access to the files via PTP and a cable to the
    camera, and any tries to access the card in a card reader may
    well render the card unreadable --- if it should have a file
    system known to the computer in first place.

    -Wolfgang

    [1] it requires pretty bad luck and not so optimal firmware of
    the flash controller (usually located inside the card) ...
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Nov 25, 2012
    #16
  17. Pastime

    Hermit Guest

    "Wolfgang Weisselberg" wrote in message

    If the camera does implement
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_rule_for_Camera_File_system
    DCIM correctly, nothing untoward will happen.
    That would require a *very* pessimal implementation in the
    camera, when mere reading a card can alter the content of
    the card. Not saying that can't happen, there are pretty bad
    firmwares out there.

    (BTW, if you suffer a brownout while accessing the card via
    card reader, the very same problem applies.)

    However, note that if you write to the card --- e.g. take
    a photo --- your statement is true: partial changes of the
    data stuctures of the card can cause a loss of data[1].
    Therefore, never, never, never take photos with your camera
    if there are already photos on the inserted card. Note also
    that writing *does* take a bit of power and the shooting
    and converting the photo does take *quite* a bit of power,
    so a drop in battery voltage at this point is a sure thing,
    the only question is whether it is critical --- and therefore,
    if the camera correctly judged that it would be not critical
    even with all the power use before actuating the shutter.

    Especially cameras using random AA batteries must eitehr leave
    a huge safety margin for the really bad cells and battery
    technologies, or suffer from critical power drops during
    shooting and card writiing.

    A card reader is better for quite different reasons, like not
    draining power from the camera battery and reporting as mass
    storage. However, this requires some sort of layout similar
    to DCF. A pessimal implementation of a camera might well only
    allow external access to the files via PTP and a cable to the
    camera, and any tries to access the card in a card reader may
    well render the card unreadable --- if it should have a file
    system known to the computer in first place.

    -Wolfgang

    [1] it requires pretty bad luck and not so optimal firmware of
    the flash controller (usually located inside the card) ...

    *****************************************************

    This might be useful if I knew what 'pessimal' meant!!?!
     
    Hermit, Nov 26, 2012
    #17
  18. [snip quoted material]
    Could you kindly mark quoted material with a leading '>' or
    '> ' in every quoted line?

    Anything that's even within intercontinental rocket range of
    a newsreader will do that for you automatically, so either
    learn how to use the software or website you use, or switch
    to one that sort of works.

    Additionally, remove material that's not relevant to your
    reply. Having to reread a whole post just to see where you
    might have added something is not my idea of fun. (You are
    directed to place your comments right under the part to which
    they apply, NOT to the top of the post, NOR doing a full
    quote and then following your comment applying to only one
    part.)

    Just observe how most others do it and you'll be fine.
    Google will tell you.
    Here it replies with the following links first:
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pessimal
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pessimal
    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pessimal
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pessimal

    Basically it's the antonym of optimal.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Nov 30, 2012
    #18
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