Macro Clamp Thingy?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Wilba, Oct 19, 2009.

  1. Wilba

    Wilba Guest

    Sorry for the vague subject - that's my problem I don't know what the thing
    I want is called.

    I've seen a thing that has two or more flexible arms attached to a base,
    with little spring clamps for "hands". I think the original purpose of the
    device might be to hold electronic components in position for soldering.
    What are they called?

    Any other ideas for holding things like insects for studio macros? (I'm
    aware of Plamps, but I'm looking for something finer.)

    Thanks.
     
    Wilba, Oct 19, 2009
    #1
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  2. Wilba

    Me Guest

    I've got one here. It's got "Multi Clip TM" written on the top of the
    base. I stuck mine on a 6" ceramic tile - first thing I laid my hands
    on that seemed like a reasonably stable but portable base.
    The aluminium wire inside the tubes breaks in the end, but it took a few
    years for that to happen, and it only cost a few $$ to begin with.
     
    Me, Oct 19, 2009
    #2
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  3. Wilba

    Too Bad Guest

    Yes, I have one on my desk at this very moment. I know where you can buy
    them online for only $6. But I'm a P&S camera owner. I'm not supposed to
    give advice and answers in a DSLR newsgroup to all those stick-up-their-ass
    DSLR camera snapshooters.
     
    Too Bad, Oct 19, 2009
    #3
  4. Wilba

    Paul Furman Guest

    "flexible arm"
    http://www.google.com/products?hl=e...esult_group&ct=title&resnum=8&ved=0CDMQrQQwBw

    Google says the plamp is 12 inches long, is it reasonably stable? I'd
    guess it bounces too much, you need something shorter, and another level
    of control for fine adjustment:
    http://edgehill.net/Misc/misc-photos/12-5-07-industrial-junkyard/pg2pc10
    Here's one nice source for used scientific gear:
    http://www.lightglassoptics.com/Newport_c_12-2-3.html
    The general search terms here are x,y,z "positioning stage" (although
    those terms might not help much on that particular web site). Poke
    around there with the parameters you need handy, how many milimeters do
    you want to move and how finely? Some of those only have a very very
    very small degree of movement. A "focusing rail" for photography is
    probably the most sensible/affordable starting point, then add components.

    Some kind of very short 'plamp' could be useful for tilt, rotation,and
    coarse positioning, without that, you will need more components and have
    to figure out how to put them together. The basics are xyz positioning
    but tilt & rotation can add a bunch more levels. It's worth thinking
    about various old junk gear that has these abilities like an old broken
    microscope or cheap kiddie microscope.

    I guess the best way to mount is on a pin from behind with some
    superglue or a hot glue gun so the mounting mechanism goes out of focus
    in the background?


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 19, 2009
    #4

  5. Too funny. Macro-photography advice coming from someone who can't even get
    one whole pin of a CPU in focus!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Oh, this is better than the comedy network!

    ROFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Funnier and Funnier, Oct 19, 2009
    #5
  6. Wilba

    John A. Guest

    "Third hand"

    There are plenty to choose from on Amazon and elsewhere.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/qid=1255937521/ref=sr_nr_i_0?ie=UTF8&rs=&keywords=third
    hand&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Athird hand%2Ci%3Atools
    or
    http://tinyurl.com/AmazonThirdHandTools

    In its heyday you could find them at Radio Shack. Your local hardware
    or hobby store might have them too.
     
    John A., Oct 19, 2009
    #6
  7. Wilba

    Paul Furman Guest

    Too funny. Macro-photography advice coming from someone who can't even get
    OK, Mr. Thumbnail-sized-examples.
    BTW, those pins are 2mm long in a 5mm tall frame wide open intended to
    have a wildly shallow DOF look ...
    ....with a stopped down glimpse at the end now:


    Show us your work. Let's see a millimeter scale with 5mm counting
    vertically and a full size crop.
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 19, 2009
    #7
  8. Oh, heavens no. Of course that's easy to accomplish and get it all in
    focus, using available light, and even doing it with shutter-speeds that
    can be hand-held. No focus-stacking even remotely required. I even have
    sample-shots sitting right here on my hard-drive that already prove what
    you wish to see. No need to even take my time to do new photos to prove it.
    Frame-sizes even tighter than what you request. Macros of a machinist's
    scale when I was testing DOF with various lens arrangements. 2.4mm vertical
    FOV. All done HAND-HELD by the light of my normal fluorescent desk-lamp
    without even moving the scale and camera closer to the lamp, done just as a
    passing curiosity one day. Easy to post! Hell, I even have a 3.1mm long
    INSECT IN FLIGHT TAKEN HAND-HELD in shadowed woodland light that would make
    your all crap DSLR snapshots look like total shit, if I took the time to
    hunt it down in my archives.

    But then you'd jump around just as all wannabe snapshooter DSLR-Trolls
    always do, hiking up your skirts, jumping up in your chairs, wildly and
    insecurely yelling,

    "IT'S STOLEN!"

    "IT WAS DONE WITH A DSLR!"

    "IT'S CROPPED!"

    "THE EXIF WAS EDITED!"

    "THE SKY IS FALLING!"

    etc. on ad-infinauseum.

    Why waste my time playing that fucked-up idiotic DSLR-Troll's game of yours
    again?

    You're a complete and total moron and idiot. You do know that by now, don't
    you?

    Your whole fucked-up life was a waste of flesh and time. You do know that
    by now, don't you?
     
    Funnier and Funnier, Oct 19, 2009
    #8
  9. Wilba

    Wilba Guest

    Wilba, Oct 20, 2009
    #9
  10. Wilba

    Paul Furman Guest

    Thanks for your contribution.
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 20, 2009
    #10
  11. Wilba

    Wilba Guest

    Yeah, I have a Manfrotto rail so I'm fine for focussing, I just need a
    better way to hold tiny subjects.
    Now I know what to search for, I've found a local shop with a Helping Hands
    for $13 so I'll go and check that out. Thanks.
     
    Wilba, Oct 20, 2009
    #11
  12. Wilba

    Wilba Guest

    Wilba, Oct 20, 2009
    #12
  13. Wilba

    Wilba Guest

    Wilba, Oct 20, 2009
    #13
  14. Wilba

    LOL! Guest

    You mean, this case?
    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    LOL!, Oct 20, 2009
    #14
  15. Wilba

    Bob Larter Guest

    Don't hold your breath waiting for the idiot P&S troll to show anything
    worth looking at.
     
    Bob Larter, Oct 20, 2009
    #15
  16. Wilba

    Bob Larter Guest

    I rest my case.
     
    Bob Larter, Oct 20, 2009
    #16
  17. Wilba

    Bob Larter Guest

    Jaycar also sell an equivalent device. (I have one on my electronics
    workbench.)
     
    Bob Larter, Oct 20, 2009
    #17
  18. Wilba

    Bob Larter Guest

    Too bad you can't produce any photos to prove your ridiculous claims. ;^)
     
    Bob Larter, Oct 20, 2009
    #18
  19. Wilba

    Wilba Guest

    They say for the one with the ballhead, "the malleability of the arm is
    tense enough to hold even the heaviest of shoe-mounted flashes securely in
    position", which sounds like a dodgy translation. I'm willing to believe it
    won't droop with a heavy flash on, but would it flex enough to make it
    useless for handheld shots because of wobbling?
     
    Wilba, Oct 21, 2009
    #19
  20. Wilba

    Paul Furman Guest

    Followup... here's the sort of rig I was talking about:
    http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=8269

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 25, 2009
    #20
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