Macro vs Non-macro lens

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by cctv.star, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. cctv.star

    cctv.star Guest

    I want to buy a portrait lens for my EOS and my first candidate is EF
    100/2.0 USM.
    However, I've never done macro photography before and feel like giving
    it a try, so I'm also thinking about EF 100/2.8 Macro USM. But macro is
    only a "sideline", so my concern is how good the macro lens is for
    ordinary/portrait photography?
    What are drawbacks of this macro for non-macro shots besides being less
    fast, bulkier and more expensive?
     
    cctv.star, Mar 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. It could try to find focus in the macro region, and back again. (Even a USM
    lens takes time when this happens.) There is a focus limiter on this lens,
    so it's worth using when doing portraits.
    If may be too sharp ...
    ....and it's a big possibly intimidating lens, particularly if the lens hood
    is in place.
     
    Malcolm Stewart, Mar 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. cctv.star

    Jim Guest

    It is probably equivalent to the standard lens, but if you don't intend to
    take macro shots, you will be spending a lot of money for capability that
    you will never use.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Mar 1, 2006
    #3
  4. cctv.star

    Matt Clara Guest

    I've heard that argumentand counter to it you hear: It can't be too sharp,
    as you can add soft focus effects to a sharp lens, but you can't make a soft
    lens sharp.

    My primary concern would be the out of focus rendition. If everything in
    focus is sharp but everything out of focus is harsh and distracting, that's
    not a good portrait lens.

    I only know of one lens for 35mm cameras that is both a macro and an
    excellent portrait lens, and that's the tokina 90mm.
     
    Matt Clara, Mar 2, 2006
    #4
  5. I thought it was the Tamron 90mm that was "both a macro and an excellent
    portrait lens".



    Cody,

    http://community-2.webtv.net/AnOvercomer02/PhotographyLinks
     
    AnOvercomer 02, Mar 3, 2006
    #5
  6. cctv.star

    Bandicoot Guest

    I thought it was the Tamron 90mm that was "both a macro and an excellent
    portrait lens".


    Both. Also the Pentax FA 100mm f2.8 macro. Most other 90-100mm macros do
    have rather harsh bokeh though, and so are sometimes not great choices for
    non-macro subjects, and especially not for portraits.


    Peter
     
    Bandicoot, Mar 3, 2006
    #6
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