Maintaining legal colours for broadcast - top tips for camera op?

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Chris Stone, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. Chris Stone

    Chris Stone Guest

    Hello,

    I've recently been working as a DV camera op on a low budget broadcast
    documentary series. The camera ops (there are multiple) regularly get
    together with the editor so she can feedback on the usefulness of the
    footage we're getting, and several times she has mentioned that some
    of our shots suffer from non-broadcastable (illegal) colours. The edit
    suite we're using does not have a legaliser, so this causes problems.
    However, we're currently suffering from a complete lack of
    understanding about the whole issue

    Does anyone have any light to shed on the issue of illegal colours?
    Specifically, how do they occur, and how can they be best avoided from
    the camera side of things?

    Many thanks,
    Chris.
     
    Chris Stone, Feb 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Chris Stone

    Steve Guidry Guest

    A properly set up camera should NOT produce illegal colors.

    Unless you're using bottom-of-the-barrel consumer cameras in extreme
    conditions (VERY bright outdoors or really saturated stage lighting) I
    suspect that the problem is on the editor's side - - probably in her deck's
    TBC settings.

    "Legalizing" it in the computer is a poor second choice. While this can be
    of course done, a good editor should run footage through her scopes on the
    way INTO the NLE, and correct for illegal colors before they hit the digital
    domain.

    Steve
     
    Steve Guidry, Feb 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Chris Stone

    nappy Guest


    However, many digital capture systems, SDI - DV - DVCAM - DVCPRO etc.. do
    not allow a tweak during capture.
     
    nappy, Feb 12, 2004
    #3
  4. Chris Stone

    Steve Guidry Guest

    OK. Fine. But that's not what I'm suggesting. Rather the opposite
    approach.

    I'm suggesting that he adjust the TBC on the input deck before it hits the
    capture card. he should make sure his colors are legal before they're
    digitized. THEN do whatever color correction he needs to do in the NLE.

    Steve
     
    Steve Guidry, Feb 12, 2004
    #4
  5. Chris Stone

    david.mccall Guest

    You may not have read that quite right. He saidThe formats you mentioned are already in the digital domain.
    Even then, are you sure professional DV, DVC-Pro, and DV-Cam
    decks lack proc-amp controls on the output?

    David
     
    david.mccall, Feb 12, 2004
    #5
  6. Chris Stone

    nappy Guest


    I do know that .. , around here at least, we tweak in the computer and
    almost NEVER tweak on the way in . UNless it is an analog signal.
     
    nappy, Feb 13, 2004
    #6
  7. Chris Stone

    david.mccall Guest

    I think that is true of most of us. Tweaking on the way in can save
    a little render time Though.

    I mostly source from Betacam, so I set the deck ou to bars, then
    use the proc-amp that is built into Incite to do the tweaks coming in.
    Incite store the proc-amp settings, so you can redigitise and get the
    exact same look (as long as you setup the source deck to bars on
    each tape. I think most people just transfer digital video AS IS.

    David
     
    david.mccall, Feb 13, 2004
    #7
  8. Chris Stone

    nappy Guest

    ditto.. on our AVIDs we can setup different proc-amp settings per tape.
    Mostly just to conform to broadcast levels.. rarely for color adjustment per
    se.
     
    nappy, Feb 13, 2004
    #8
  9. Chris Stone

    Chris Stone Guest

    thanks everyone for your replies! I think we're suffering from lack of
    experience/knowledge and some bad communication. I'll feedback what
    you've said.

    Thanks again,
    chris.
     
    Chris Stone, Feb 17, 2004
    #9
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