Make Your Own Digital Camera ISO Test Target

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by cc, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. cc

    cc Guest

    """
    dpnow writes I run a digital photography site and came across what I
    thought might be an interesting story. It's about a Cornell university
    researcher that has reverse-engineered the design of the ISO 12233
    resolution test target, used by all the best digital camera testers.
    These usually cost over $100 but a free pdf download of the target is
    available. Print it out on a good quality printer and you have your own
    ISO-spec test target so you can find out how good (or bad) your camera
    really is!
    """

    http://slashdot.org/articles/04/10/18/1127252.shtml?tid=126&tid=159&tid=1
     
    cc, Oct 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. cc

    yankeedam Guest

    If you want an ISO 12233 chart to play with, and don't want to pay big
    bux, the Westin chart seems to have a problem printing out -- but
    another such creation is available.

    I have a theory (still trying to test it) that Westin's file is
    intentionally (by someone) crippled-- that it contains an instruction
    to print at low resolution. (He hasn't yet replied to my email.)

    The chart file at ISO headquarters' website is 611K in size.
    Westin's file is 211K, which would lead you to wonder how such low-res
    instructions could fit. My answer: First, the original 611K file
    probably has lots of extra instructions, like "don't let yourself be
    copied or emailed." PDF files can contain Javascript and lots of other
    languages that Adobe Reader understands.

    Second, I have found on the web ANOTHER 12233 file, a PDF of only
    93K. It looks a lot like Westin's file, same typefaces (different from
    the ISO original, see the "6" digits), without the Westin credit line
    at bottom. It has not quite the same spacing anomalies as Westin-- see
    the 4's and the 5's at left center. I am scouting around to find
    someone to print the file full (15.75"x9.45") size-- or double size,
    since I have downloaded some Chinese software which can enlarge a PDF.

    My theory is that the smaller file lacks all of the sneaky crippling
    instructions, and will cheerfully print at the full resolution of the
    chosen printer. On little letter-size inkjets, even the Westin file and
    my enlargements of it print at full 600dpi resolution, but only the
    center tile (circle-in-square plus the smaller parts of the
    flaring-parallel-line wedges). My thinking is that the smaller inkjets
    are not smart enough to hear the Westin file saying (via Adobe) to
    print at low resolution. Printing five or more of these centers, trying
    for inkjet on glossy (better contrast, just light them from the side),
    and pasting them around a big piece of cardboard, will be my "cope"
    until I find a PDF full chart that will print as well as the selected
    printer can perform.

    If you want a copy of the mysterious 93K file to play with, give me
    a buzz at and I'll email it to you. Just promise me
    that you'll post your test results somewhere soon (I have no website).
    http://slashdot.org/articles/04/10/18/1127252.shtml?tid=126&tid=159&tid=1
     
    yankeedam, Dec 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. cc

    Rescho Guest

    I downloaded the PDF file
    (http://www.graphics.cornell.edu/~westin/misc/res-chart.html) and printed it out on
    my Canon s9000 A3 printer. The printer seems to be the limiting factor as detail is
    clearly visible on the PDF file. Aliasing on the resolution wedges limits the
    charts useful resolution to about 1200 lines.
    I'd be interested to know if anyone has had any better results and if so how?
    There's some useful information about this (but somewhat inconclusive) available at
    http://new.dpnow.com/1263.html.

    Regards
    Peter.


    If you want an ISO 12233 chart to play with, and don't want to pay big
    bux, the Westin chart seems to have a problem printing out -- but
    another such creation is available.

    I have a theory (still trying to test it) that Westin's file is
    intentionally (by someone) crippled-- that it contains an instruction
    to print at low resolution. (He hasn't yet replied to my email.)

    The chart file at ISO headquarters' website is 611K in size.
    Westin's file is 211K, which would lead you to wonder how such low-res
    instructions could fit. My answer: First, the original 611K file
    probably has lots of extra instructions, like "don't let yourself be
    copied or emailed." PDF files can contain Javascript and lots of other
    languages that Adobe Reader understands.

    Second, I have found on the web ANOTHER 12233 file, a PDF of only
    93K. It looks a lot like Westin's file, same typefaces (different from
    the ISO original, see the "6" digits), without the Westin credit line
    at bottom. It has not quite the same spacing anomalies as Westin-- see
    the 4's and the 5's at left center. I am scouting around to find
    someone to print the file full (15.75"x9.45") size-- or double size,
    since I have downloaded some Chinese software which can enlarge a PDF.

    My theory is that the smaller file lacks all of the sneaky crippling
    instructions, and will cheerfully print at the full resolution of the
    chosen printer. On little letter-size inkjets, even the Westin file and
    my enlargements of it print at full 600dpi resolution, but only the
    center tile (circle-in-square plus the smaller parts of the
    flaring-parallel-line wedges). My thinking is that the smaller inkjets
    are not smart enough to hear the Westin file saying (via Adobe) to
    print at low resolution. Printing five or more of these centers, trying
    for inkjet on glossy (better contrast, just light them from the side),
    and pasting them around a big piece of cardboard, will be my "cope"
    until I find a PDF full chart that will print as well as the selected
    printer can perform.

    If you want a copy of the mysterious 93K file to play with, give me
    a buzz at and I'll email it to you. Just promise me
    that you'll post your test results somewhere soon (I have no website).
    http://slashdot.org/articles/04/10/18/1127252.shtml?tid=126&tid=159&tid=1
     
    Rescho, Dec 31, 2004
    #3
  4. cc

    Rob Guest

    I had it printed out on a d-lab 2 at 12x18" and it still wasn't really
    too useful, I suspect it really needs to be printed on an offset press.
    I was thinking that it could be contact printed in small quantities
    using a neg produced from a high res imagesetter too?

    Cheers,

    Rob
     
    Rob, Dec 31, 2004
    #4
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