Makeshift LED based Enlarger alignment tool

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by f/256, Jan 1, 2005.

  1. f/256

    f/256 Guest

    f/256, Jan 1, 2005
    #1
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  2. f/256

    dr bob Guest

    dr bob, Jan 1, 2005
    #2
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  3. ==> Bookmarked.
    Unnecessarily complex. But way kewl! Psychedelic patterns 'n all ...

    (How about making an even more kaleidoscopic version?)


    --
    Today's bullshit job description:

    • Collaborate to produce operational procedures for the systems management
    of the production Information Technology infrastructure.

    - from an actual job listing on Craigslist (http://www.craigslist.org)
     
    David Nebenzahl, Jan 1, 2005
    #3
  4. By the way, at the end of your page, you say:

    A professional and accurate tool exists, for information you may want
    to visit www.zig-align.com.

    I believe your rig is every bit as accurate as anything commercially available.


    --
    Today's bullshit job description:

    • Collaborate to produce operational procedures for the systems management
    of the production Information Technology infrastructure.

    - from an actual job listing on Craigslist (http://www.craigslist.org)
     
    David Nebenzahl, Jan 1, 2005
    #4
  5. f/256

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    I'm tempted to be very blunt when it comes to
    'alignment tools' but I won't. I do not wish to incur
    the rath of that tool industry.
    I have used the trapezoidal method. Others have used
    the trapezoidal method. It will produce the most
    accurate alignment possible. But it does not
    require the purchase of any equipment.
    I hope I've not incurred any rath. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Jan 1, 2005
    #5
  6. f/256

    f/256 Guest

    available.

    I agree. My only reason in mentioning that site is that my tools is
    inspired in theirs, so I thought that mentioning would be the right thing to
    do.

    Guillermo
     
    f/256, Jan 1, 2005
    #6
  7. f/256

    f/256 Guest

    Saying about trapezoidal method: "It will produce the most accurate
    alignment possible" is not correct, IMO. It can probably produce as
    accurate alignment as other methods but not necessarily "the most accurate".
    Any method used is better than nothing, that for sure. I haven't used the
    trapezoidal method, but I have used a bubble level and an inclinometer, but
    I find that using this LED based tool I can make the "across and along" both
    at once. Using any other method I have used, making the across the stage
    alignment affects the along one, and vice versa, so it becomes an almost
    never ending process to have both directions aligned.

    As far as purchase, the whole thing cost me 2 bucks or so: 75cts for the
    LEDs and about a buck for the mirror tile, the 9Vdc battery is the one
    coming from the annual change of batteries of my smoke alarms, I change them
    once a year but the batteries still have some juice in them.

    Guillermo
     
    f/256, Jan 1, 2005
    #7
  8. Stephan Goldstein, Jan 2, 2005
    #8
  9. f/256

    f/256 Guest

     
    f/256, Jan 2, 2005
    #9
  10. f/256

    f/256 Guest

    BTW, you could skip the holes and just remove the mirror silvering in the
    areas the holes should have been.

    Guillermo
     
    f/256, Jan 2, 2005
    #10
  11. DOH! Excellent solution, I don't relish drilling holes in glass, but this is
    perfect.

    steve
     
    Stephan Goldstein, Jan 2, 2005
    #11
  12. f/256

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    One problem with methods other than the trapezoidal is
    their dependence on surfaces or surface areas other than
    those actually used when making enlargments.

    The trapezoidal method is the real world way to align; a
    negative in the carrier and projected image below. I used
    a ruler, square, and necessary screw drivers, pliers, etc.

    The projected image after alignment is squared and in
    focus across the entire plane.

    I'm not sure of the origin of the term 'trapezoidal'.
    Likely the shape of the unaligned projected image
    gave the method it's name.

    I may have reinvented the trapezoidal method. I noticed
    that my projected image was out of shape. So, out with my
    tools, I proceeded to adjust. Something of a no brainer
    you might say. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Jan 2, 2005
    #12
  13. I wasn't sure just what was meant by "trapezoidal adjustment", but your reply
    makes it clear.

    Having said that, I see now that Guillermo's (and mine and others) method is
    easier, faster and more accurate. It only depends on one item other than the
    actual working surfaces of the enlarger under test, and that's the piece of
    glass which is the upper mirror. The chances of that being anything other than
    flat (within the accuracy needed for this adjustment) are about nil. And the
    observed pattern (the receding "hall of mirrors" image) allows for far finer
    adjustments, far more easily, than your method, which relies on making (and
    comparing) very precise measurements with a ruler that are prone to
    innaccuracy (well, at least with *my* eyes). Plus, making the pattern itself
    (to be placed in the negative carrier) is error-prone.

    If I didn't have any mirrors handy I'd use your method, but only then.


    --
    Today's bullshit job description:

    • Collaborate to produce operational procedures for the systems management
    of the production Information Technology infrastructure.

    - from an actual job listing on Craigslist (http://www.craigslist.org)
     
    David Nebenzahl, Jan 2, 2005
    #13
  14. f/256

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    Not that clear. There is no pattern to make. Your choice
    of negative will do as long as the corners are square.
    I used a square and ruler plus the small handtools needed
    to make the adjustments.
    The trapezoidal method is nothing new. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Jan 3, 2005
    #14
  15. You don't need the leds at all, if you are willing
    to just do some staring into a dim hall of mirrors.
    Total investment, one mirror tile.

    See (the following long url...)
    http://groups-beta.google.com/group..._doneTitle=Back+to+Search&&d#bcbecc0603c2e5c5

    for example.
    This method was posted over 10 years ago.

    The main problem is that this method is very very sensitive
    to minor out-of-alignment situations.

    Oh, and by the way, the more important alignment is probably
    film-stage to negative stage.

    But using leds looks like fun.


    RJF
     
    Richard Fateman, Jan 3, 2005
    #15
  16. f/256

    John Guest

    And to think that I just use a 30" dowel and a 24" piece of
    glass.


    Regards,

    John S. Douglas, Photographer - http://www.puresilver.org
    Please remove the "_" when replying via email
     
    John, Jan 3, 2005
    #16
  17. f/256

    f/256 Guest

    That's the way I started, but had too much trouble seeing the black dots I
    made with a marker, I then took a small flashlight and was trying to
    illuminate the black dots from bellow, when I saw the nice and bright
    multiple reflexions of the flashlight, that's when I remembered the
    "Sig-Al-Lhing" using LEDs.
    Isn't that good?
    That one is always right on and never needs adjustment :)
    I know you meant film/negative stage to lens stage.
    Sure it is, and is easy and very cheap to do.

    Guillermo
     
    f/256, Jan 3, 2005
    #17
  18. And how does that work, pray tell?

    D "puzzled" N


    --
    Today's bullshit job description:

    • Collaborate to produce operational procedures for the systems management
    of the production Information Technology infrastructure.

    - from an actual job listing on Craigslist (http://www.craigslist.org)
     
    David Nebenzahl, Jan 3, 2005
    #18
  19. f/256

    Tom Phillips Guest

    very simply...

    I'm not surprised...
     
    Tom Phillips, Jan 3, 2005
    #19
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