Maxxum 7xi/7D ; Expansion cards and instructions from Minolta

Discussion in 'Minolta' started by veritas, Oct 7, 2006.

  1. veritas

    veritas Guest

    Hi ,

    I have a Minolta Maxxum 7xi . Now , 14 yeras after I purchased it ,
    I am looking to find instruction sheets for the creative expansion cards
    that it uses. I am seriously considering skipping to the Minolta Maxxum 7D
    ( digital ) sooner rather than later . Can anyone tell me if the nice
    functions of those expansion cards on the 35mm 7xi are already built in to
    the Maxxum 7D ?

    Also , as far as the 35 mm 7xi goes I would really like to get instruction
    sheets for some of the cards I plan on purchasing from eBay(?) . Any ideas
    where I may be able to find them ?

    All I have is the Hove publication on the Maxxum 7xi -- which writes about
    the cards but not in detail ...

    Thanks in advance ..
     
    veritas, Oct 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. veritas

    Errol Groff Guest

    Sorry but the Minolta 7D ship has sailed. I bought one after
    christmas 2005 and about three weeks later Minolta announced they were
    getting out of the camera business.

    Sony purchased their technology and now has out a 10 megapixel camera
    based on the Minolta technology.

    Errol Groff
     
    Errol Groff, Oct 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. veritas

    veritas Guest

    So what are you going to do now ?
     
    veritas, Oct 8, 2006
    #3
  4. veritas

    Ben Brugman Guest

    A lot of functions of the expansion cards are nowadays build into the modern
    camera. Some point and shoot camera's have often more functions build in.
    The DSlr's only have a few functions build in.
    (Portret, sports, closup, night exposure are normally present.)

    Minolta had some functions which can not be delivered by the modern camera.
    On the 7xi they introduced the 'automatic' zoom. So switching the camera on
    it decided what the 'initial' zoom position should be. Another option with
    the
    'child' card was that the child could be kept the same 'size' in the picture
    even
    if the child was moving to or from the camera.
    Another function was showing more wide angle in the viewfinder than the
    the picture would take. (During the picture taking the lens would zoom in,
    take the picture and zoom out).
    All this was offcourse limited by the lenses zoom capabilities.

    All these zoom functions I have never seen again on a SLR (or DSLR) there
    might be some point and shoot camera's witch had something similar to
    the 'child' function.

    Most off the cards were to expensive for the 'extra' functionality those
    cards
    offered, but I know off people who for example bought the close up expansion
    card because they did a lot of closeup's and did not have the knowledge to
    do
    it themselves.

    Remember there are only a few parameters which actually make the picture.
    (location 3 coordinates, direction and rotation 3 parameters, time 1
    parameter
    these seven are determined by holding the camera and pushing the
    shutterrelease).
    Then there are only four parameters: shutterspeet, aperature, zoom,
    focusdistance,
    which are controled by the camera.
    But then there are hundreds of methods to set these parameters.
    The expansion card just added to the methods of setting the parameters not
    to expanding the number of parameters or expanding the parameters.
    I do ignore film-, ccd parameters, postprocessing and quality.

    ben.
     
    Ben Brugman, Oct 8, 2006
    #4
  5. He will probably do what I am doing with my KM-5400 Dimage film
    scanner.....Use the hell out of it until it breaks, and then send it off to
    Sony, and hope they will fix it.........
     
    William Graham, Oct 8, 2006
    #5
  6. veritas

    veritas Guest

    Which cards did the things you describe above ? Do you remember what they
    were called ?

    Peter
     
    veritas, Oct 10, 2006
    #6
  7. veritas

    Ben Brugman Guest

    Standard on the camera was the Wide-View mode.
    In the Wide-view mode the lens chooses a shorter
    focal length thereby giving 150% of the normal view
    in the viewfinder.

    Image-Size Lock.
    This was a button on the lens tube of the xi-zoomlenses.
    Pressing this button kept the subject on a constant
    enlargement.

    There was a child card, but the brochures are not
    totally clear what that did. (It uses Automatic
    Programmed Zoom, but what that exactly did is nog clear).

    On the next camera Minolta (700si) abandonned the
    automatic zoom.

    The card system was called the
    Creatieve Chip Card System.

    Cards (in the brochure) :
    Travel Card
    Child Card
    Background Priority Card
    Panning Card
    Customized Function Card xi
    Sports Action Card
    Multiple Exposure Card
    Exposure Bracketing Card
    Flash Bracketing Card
    Automatic Program Shift Card
    Fantasy Effect Card
    Multi-Spot Memory Card
    Portait Card
    Close-up Card Card
    Highlight/Shadow Card
    Data Memory Card

    Mosty off the functions of the cards are now fairly standard on a lot of
    camera's. The Data Memory Card could hold information for up to
    40 pictures. (shutterspeed, aperature, focallength, max aperature,
    exposure correction.) That was new in the camera of this pricerange
    in those days.
    All cards doing something with zoom was also inovative, it just never
    has cought on.
    Most people would only buy one or two cards or none. Only one card
    could be used at the time, so you could not use the memory card
    in combination with another card.

    Most card did not add to the capabilities of the camera, only to the
    way those capabilities could be reached.

    Ben.
     
    Ben Brugman, Oct 11, 2006
    #7
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